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Publication numberUS3223331 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1965
Filing dateAug 21, 1962
Priority dateAug 21, 1962
Publication numberUS 3223331 A, US 3223331A, US-A-3223331, US3223331 A, US3223331A
InventorsBaker Clarence P
Original AssigneeBaker Clarence P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil burner nozzles
US 3223331 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1965 c, BAKER 3,223,331

OIL BURNER NOZ ZLES Filed Aug. 21, 1962 FIG.|

23 27 CLARENCE P. BAKER IN VEN TOR.

52. 5 gy/w ATTORNEY.

United States Patent 3,223,331 OIL BURNER NOZZLES Clarence P. Baker, 3116 NE. Everett St., Portland, Greg. Filed Aug. 21, 1962, Ser. No. 218,369 Claims. (c1. 239 4s4 My invention relates to oil burner nozzles for pressurized systems using all weights of fuel, whether such burners be of the gun type or vortex type.

One object of my invention is to provide an oil burner nozzle which has a drip reservoir externally of the nozzle orifice.

Another object of my invention is to provide a nozzle equipped with a spring-tensioned valve internally thereof which controls the fuel flow within the nozzle.

A further object of my invention is to provide a nozzle equipped with both a reservoir externally of the nozzle orifice and a spring-tensioned valve internally thereof to control fuel flow and drip.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a nozzle which will be more efficient in the conservation of fuel and which will eliminate the smoke and fire hazard caused by post burning cycle drip.

Still another and further object of my invention is to provide a nozzle incorporating the foregoing features which is readily interchangeable with conventional oil burner nozzles now in use.

Still other and further objects of my invention will be apparent from the drawings, specification and claims herein.

Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a sectional elevation view of my improved nozzle taken along line 1-1 of FIG. 2 in the direction of the arrows, showing the exterior reservoir at the nozzle tip, the recessed inner nozzle core, the spring within the core, the poppet valve, the valve seat and core retainer, the fuel grooves in the lower end of the poppet valve and a conventional, porous type filter for said nozzle.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the nozzle.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the inner core, showing four fuel feed and spinner grooves on the top thereof.

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the valve seat and core retainer showing the concentric passageway therethrough and the kerf thereof.

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the poppet valve, showing diametrically opposed fuel passage grooves in the enlarged lower end of said valve.

Referring further to the drawings:

The nozzle head of my invention is generally of conventional design and configuration. My nozzle, however, is provided with a reservoir 11 at its tip, externally of the orifice, which is so dimensioned that it will not interfere with any angle of flame but will catch fuel dribbles emitting from the orifice 12 whether the nozzle is used on a vertical or horizontal type system. The lip 13 of the nozzle reservoir 11, as best seen in FIG. 1 of the drawings, is extended beyond the orifice at the tip of the nozzle head 10 with the walls 14 of the reservoir 11 being carried a considerable distance rearwardly of the said orifice and being flared slightly so as to have a greater circumference at their inner ends than at their outer ends to intercept and retain thereby any fuel dribbling from the orifice 12 regardless of whether the nozzle is positioned horizontally or vertically. The nozzle head is provided with conventional polyhedronal sides 15 medi ally thereof with a conventionally threaded portion 16 at the end thereof opposite from the orifice 12. The nozzle head 16 is hollow and is further provided with threads internally thereof. An inner core 17 is slidably positioned with the nozzle head 10 immediately in back of the orifice 12 therethrough. The inner core 17 is so shaped and 3,223,331 Patented Dec. 14, 1965 designed as to allow fuel to flow between it and the inner surface of the nozzle head 10. The upper surface 13 of the inner core is preferably provided with means, such as fuel feed and spinner grooves 19 to facilitate the passage of fuel to the orifice 12 of the nozzle head 10. The inner core 17 is also provided with a diametrical passageway 20 disposed therethrough near its lower edge and with a recess 21 extending longitudinally from its lowermost edge. A spring 22 is positioned with the recess 21 and tensions a poppet valve 23, or other suitable valve, such as a ball check valve, and holds said valve in firm engagement with the upper surface of valve seat and core retainer 24 to prevent fuel passage. The said element 24 is provided with threads on its peripheral surface complementary to those disposed on the inner surface of the nozzle head 10, and it is also provided with a concentric passageway 25 therethrough shaped to accommodate the head and stem of valve 23. A diametrically disposed slot, or kerf, 26 may be placed on the lower surface of said valve seat and core retainer 24 to facilitate its positioning in or withdrawal from the nozzle head 10. The lower end 27 of the valve 23 has an enlarged diameter which is complementary to and slidably movable within the concentric passageway 25 through the valve seat and core retainer 24. One or more grooves 28 extend throughout the entire length of the enlarged lower end 27 of the valve 23 and permit the flow of fuel therethrough. A conventional filter 29, such as a porous or screen type, is threadedly engaged with nozzle head 10 below the valve seat and core retainer to complete my fuel nozzle.

In operation the pump of the system in which my nozzle is installed forces fuel through the filter 29 and the grooves 28 of the valve 23 and into the concentric passageway 25 of the valve seat and core retainer 24. The fuel, while being pumped, will attain sufiicient pressure to open the valve 23 by compressing the spring 22, continue on through the opening 25, by the valve 23, and out through the diametrical passageway 20 of the inner core 17, between the outer surface of the inner core 17 and the interior surface of the nozzle head 10 via the fuel feed and spinner grooves 19 and out through the orifice 12 of the nozzle head. The pressurized fuel breaks into a fine spray upon striking the atmosphere and fans out into the predetermined angle to be ignited by the electrodes, or other means, of the burning system. The length of lip 13 of reservoir 11 is so dimensioned that it will not interfere with any desirable angle of flame and will still be sufficient to catch dribbles of fuel trickling out of the nozzle orifice 12 at the beginning and ending of a burning cycle. The spring-tensioned valve minimizes any fuel dribble at either the beginning or end of the burning cycle. Its cooperation with the reservoir eliminates fuel drippage since the valve will close ofif fuel flow within the nozzle as soon as the pressure diminishes by reason of cessation of the pump at the end of a burning cycle. It thereby prevents fuel from being forced out of the nozzle after the burning cycle has been completed. The small amount of fuel which may get by the valve will be intercepted by the reservoir at the nozzle tip and effectively prevent it from dripping from the nozzle. The fuel which is intercepted by the reservoir 11 will either dissipate by evaporation between burning cycles or will be gathered into the spray of fuel and ignited when the burning cycle again starts.

It is to be understood that a ball, or other suitable type, valve may be substituted for the poppet valve shown in the embodiment disclosed herein and that the spring, tensioning the valve, may be one of any predetermined strength suitable for the desired pressure or that developed by the particular system in which the nozzle is installed,

so as to effect a proper fuel flow and combustion within the operational limits of said system. It is further to be understood that the embodiment disclosed herein is merely a preferred version of my invention, primarily adapted to hydrocarbon burners, and that many variations thereof are feasible without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention as described and claimed herein.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. An oil burner nozzle consisting of: a nozzle head having an orifice through one end thereof; a lip circumscribing the orifice end of said nozzle head, said lip extending forwardly and rearwardly from said orifice a substantial distance and having a greater inner diameter at its rearward end than at its forward end, thereby forming an exterior reservoir on said nozzle head; a core, recessed at its rearward end, disposed within said nozzle head, said core being provided with fuel passing means communicating its recessed interior with said nozzle orifice; core retaining means engaging with said nozzle head and the recessed end of said core, retaining said core within said nozzle, said retaining means having a passageway therethrough; a valve seated at said passageway through said core retaining means; and a spring positioned within said core engaging with and tensioning said valve.

2. An oil burner nozzle of the character described in claim 1 in which said fuel passing means is one set of passageways.

3. An oil burner nozzle of the character described in claim 1 in which said valve is a poppet valve with its stem positioned in said core retaining means passageway, said stem havng an enlarged lower end complementary to said core retaining means passageway and said enlarged lower end having a longitudinal passageway disposed at its peripheral edge.

4. An oil burner nozzle of the character described in claim 1 in which said fuel passing means is one set of passageways and in which said valve is a poppet valve with its stem positioned in said core retaining means passageway, said stem having an enlarged lower end complementary to said core retaining means passageway and said enlarged lower end having a plurality of longitudinal passageways disposed in spaced relation at its peripheral edge.

5. An oil burner nozzle consisting of: a nozzle head having an orifice through one end thereof; a lip circumscribing the orifice end of said nozzle head, said lip extending forwardly and rearwardly from said orifice a substantial distance and having a greater inner diameter at its rearward end than at its forward end, thereby forming an exterior reservoir on said nozzle head; a core, recessed at its rearward end, disposed Within said nozzle head, said core being provided with fuel passing means communicating its recessed interior with said nozzle orifice; and core retaining means engaging with said nozzle head and the recessed end of said core, retaining said core within said nozzle, said retaining means having a passageway therethrough.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,071,920 2/ 1937 Czarnecki 239493 2,407,915 9/ 1946 Ball 239493 2,569,033 9/1951 Wise 239464 2,590,772 3/ 1952 Joyce 239--464 2,628,867 2/ 1953 Purchas 239-464 2,643,915 6/1953 Pieroni 239493 2,660,474 11/1953 Lee 239493 2,733,960 2/1956 Barfod 239464 2,772,120 11/1956 Olson 239493 2,921,747 1/1960 Burman 239-464 EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2071920 *Dec 18, 1934Feb 23, 1937Eddington Metal Specialty CoSpray nozzle and strainer
US2407915 *Aug 20, 1942Sep 17, 1946Chrysler CorpInjection nozzle
US2569033 *May 15, 1947Sep 25, 1951Bendix Aviat CorpBurner nozzle
US2590772 *Sep 5, 1945Mar 25, 1952Power Jets Res & Dev LtdLiquid fuel burner and the like
US2628867 *Jan 7, 1948Feb 17, 1953Gen Motors CorpDuplex nozzle
US2643915 *Jun 27, 1951Jun 30, 1953Bruno PieroniOil burner nozzle
US2660474 *Aug 30, 1950Nov 24, 1953Ii Leighton LeeNozzle
US2733960 *Jun 11, 1952Feb 7, 1956 Barfod
US2772120 *Feb 14, 1955Nov 27, 1956Delavan Mfg CompanyUnitary spray nozzle and filter assembly
US2921747 *Aug 14, 1958Jan 19, 1960Bosch Arma CorpNozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3488005 *Aug 7, 1967Jan 6, 1970Baker Clarence PBurner nozzles
US3623660 *Dec 12, 1969Nov 30, 1971Elicopter Soc Trasporti AereiDripproof valve for preventing the leakage of liquid products
US4317542 *Feb 4, 1980Mar 2, 1982Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaFuel injector
US4472134 *Nov 5, 1981Sep 18, 1984Electro Vapor Energy Corp.Vaporizing fuel oil burner
US4548356 *Aug 12, 1983Oct 22, 1985Robert Bosch GmbhFuel injection nozzle for internal combustion engines
US5890658 *Apr 30, 1997Apr 6, 1999Satronic AgNozzle closing valve, as well as pressure atomizer nozzle having such a nozzle closing valve
US6783087 *Apr 9, 2002Aug 31, 2004Nippon Soken, Inc.Fuel injector
DE3019461A1 *May 21, 1980Nov 26, 1981Weishaupt Max GmbhDueseneinrichtung
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/464, 239/453, 239/533.2, 239/590.3, 239/493, 239/103
International ClassificationF23D11/38, F23D11/36
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/383
European ClassificationF23D11/38B