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Publication numberUS3224120 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1965
Filing dateApr 29, 1963
Priority dateApr 29, 1963
Publication numberUS 3224120 A, US 3224120A, US-A-3224120, US3224120 A, US3224120A
InventorsHoward Wilmoth John, Wilmoth Harry L
Original AssigneeHoward Wilmoth John, Wilmoth Harry L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mobile elevating loader
US 3224120 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. H. WlLMOTH ETAL 3,224,120

MOBILE ELEVATING LOADER S Sheets-Sheet 1 JOHN HOWARD W/L MOTH HARRY L. W/l. MOTH INVENTORS ATTORNEYS Dec. 21, 1965 Filed April 29, 1963 on m m hw P :/%w L GK 1 in wk 4 H 1965 J. H. WILMOTH ETAL 3,224,120

MOBILE ELEVATING LOADER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 29, 1963 omx Q -EJOH/V HOWARD W/LMQTH HARRY L. W/LMOTH INV'NmRS United States Patent Qfiice amaze Patented Dec. 21, 1965 3,224,120 MOBILE ELEVATING LOADER John Howard Wilmoth, 5756 N. Flora, and Harry L. Wiimoth, 6289 N. 1st, both of Fresno, Calif. Filed Apr. 29, 1963, Ser. No. 276,255 8 Claims. (Cl. 37-9) The present invention relates to a mobile elevating loader which readily incorporates as a source of motive power a tractor of contemporary or any other suitable design, either track-type or wheeled. The invention more particularly relates to an earth excavating loader employing an earth elevating reel in cooperating relation with previously known earth scraping blades, such as a conventional bulldozer.

Previously known earthworking equipment includes a variety of specialized forms, each having utility to perform a particular function. Many of such specialized forms incorporate a prime mover which has utility only to propel such equipment. Since the cost of contemporary prime movers, such as track-type and wheeled tractors, is quite high, it is desirous to provide equipment which further enhances their utility.

Included in such specialized forms are tractors equipped with bulldozer blades, bucket-type loaders, normally capable of dumping only in a forward direction, and earth excavating and transporting scrapers of the open-bowl and apron design. While each of these specialized forms is efiicient for a single purpose, all of them require great amounts of power during the loading and elevating cycle, and certain of the forms are incapable of elevating earth from an excavation zone due to their limited performance characteristics.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an elevating loader which is adapted to incorporate contemporary vehicles, such as track-type or wheeled tractors.

Another object is to provide an elevating loader of improved efiiciency and having a wide range of utility.

Another object is to provide an earth excavating loader of the elevating type which is capable of operation in a variety of excavating environments.

A further object is to provide an earth elevating loader of well-balanced design and having components thereof arranged in substantial bilateral symmetry.

A still further object is to provide an earth elevating loader which reduces the net unit cost of excavating and elevating earth.

These, together with other objects, will become more fully apparent upon reference to the following description and accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of an elevating loader embodying the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a view in front elevation of the elevating loader of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view in side elevation, partly in section taken in a plane represented by the line 3-3 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of that portion of the loader illustrated in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a view in transverse vertical section taken on line 55 of FIG. 3.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 1, a mobile vehicle is indicated at and illustrated in the form of a conventional track-type tractor as a source of motive power for the elevating loader of the present invention. The tractor 10 includes a prime mover, such as an internal combustion engine, indicated at 11. The engine is arranged to drive an hydraulic pump 12 incorporated in hydraulic power control systems provided on contemporary tractors. The pump 12 is illustrated as a specific form of power means incorporated in the present invention for the purpose of actuating hydraulic motors subsequently to be described. The term hydraulic motors, as subsequently employed herein, is understood to include both rotary and reciprocating devices for translating hydraulic into mechanical power. Other suitable forms of power means, such as electrical or mechanical, will readily occur to those skilled in the art.

The tractor includes a pair of laterally opposed ground engaging traction members in the form of articulated tracks 15. The tracks are independently driven by the engine 11 through suitable power transmission means, not shown. Each track is arranged for movement relative to a respective track frame 16 rigidly secured to the tractor and forming a part thereof, as shown in FIG. 3. To facilitate such movement, an idler wheel 17 is rotatably mounted in the track frame with the track 15 trained therearound. A plurality of longitudinally spaced lower track rollers 18 are individually rigidly secured to a respective one of the track frames 16, as by capscrews. To provide support for the upper run of the track 15, a plurality of longitudinally spaced upper track carrier rollers 19 are similarly secured to the track frame 16. As is Wellknown in such track-type vehicles, each of the tracks 15 is individually powered to permit steering of the vehicle by appropriate interruption of the power to one of the tracks and/ or braking or reversing of the track subjected to such power interruption.

A pair of laterally opposed trunnions are individually secured to a respective one of the track frames 16 and provide a horizontal transverse pivotal axis for a pair of laterally opposed push arms 26. The arms are pivotally connected at their proximal ends to a respective one of the trunnions and support at their distal ends a bulldozer blade 27. The blade 27 is extended transversely of the vehicle 10 and provided with an earth engaging face curved at a predetermined radius and generated in a longitudinal vertical plane relative to the vehicle. Opposite ends of the blade are pivotally connected to a respective one of the push arms 26 by a pair of pivot pins 28, thereby adapting the blade for pivotal movement about a transverse horizontal axis. As can be seen in FIG. 4, each end of the blade is provided with a laterally extended wing 29, which facilitates recovery and elevation of earth previously deposited in a windrow. A transversely extended cutting blade 30 is rigidly secured to the blade at its lower portion. The blade 30 scrapes the earth at a selected depth during traversing movement of the vehicle, thereby excavating earth in an excavating zone, generally indicated at 31. As can be seen in FIG. 3, each end of the blade carries a stop block 32 to facilitate elevation of cooperating earth elevating apparatus subsequently to be described.

A hydraulically actuated lift ram 35 is disposed at each end of the bulldozer blade 27 and is pivotally connected to a respective one of the push arms 26, as by a pin 36. The opposite end of each ram 35 is connected to the vehicle 10 by a similar pin 37. Each of the rams 35 is provided with a pair of hoses 38, which alternately serve as supply and return lines upon appropriate positioning of control valves associated with the pump 12. It is believed evident that appropriate extension and retraction of the rams 35 effects selective elevational positioning of the blade 27 and the cutting edge 30.

To effect tipping of the blade 27 about the horizontal transverse axis afforded by the pivot pins 28, each end of the blade is also provided with a combined tipping and tilting ram 40. Each of the rams is pivotally connected to the blade at a point above a respective one of the pins 28 as by the pivotal connection indicated at 41. The opposite end of each of the rams 40 is likewise pivotally connected to a respective one of the push arms 26 by a pin 42. Hydraulic hoses 43 are connected by means not shown tothe pump 12 and alternately serve as supply and return lines under the influence of a suitable control valve. It is to be understood that the control valve for the rams 40 is capable of both independent extension and retraction of each of the rams, as well as simultaneous operation thereof. It will be observed that simultaneous extension of the rams 40 effects a tipping of the blade 27 about the axis afforded by the pins 28. Extension and/ or retraction of only one of the rams 40 effects a tilting of the blade in a transverse plane about the longitudinal axis of the vehicle. The same resulted tipping can be effected by appropriate differential rates of extension and/or retraction of the combined tipping and tilting rams 40.

A pair of laterally opposed forwardly projecting arch arms 58 are each individually pivotally connected to a respective one of the trunnions 25 by a stabilizing link 51. One end of each stabilizing link is connected by a .pivot pin to a respective one of the arch arms 50 and the opposite end of the link is connected to one of the trunnions 25. Each of the arms 50 is provided with a lower branch arm 55 extended forwardly substantially coextensively with the distal end of the arm 50. In a similar manner, an upper arch arm 56 is forwardly upwardly extended from each of the arms 50.

As can be seen more clearly in FIGS. 3 and 5, a pair of transversely spaced annular bearing rings 57 are each individually rigidly secured to a respective one of the upper arch arms 56. Each of the rings 57 supports a large diameter bearing 58 and thereby provides an axis of rotation for an annular reel 59. It is to be noted that the axis of rotation afforded by the bearings 58 is substantially horizontal and normal to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle. The reel is generated about the axis of rotation at a radius slightly smaller than the predetermined radius for the blade 27. Such relative dimensions permits relative elevational movement of the blade without interfering with reel rotation during ground traversal.

A shield 60 is disposed internally of the reel 59 and provides an annular peripheral wall 61 extended throughout a predetermined are about the axis of rotation of the reel. The wall 61 terminates in opposite ends 62 angularly related to each other in a converging manner thereby forming a discharge chute at an elevated position relative to the excavating zone 31. The peripheral wall 61 is rigidly secured to a pair of axially spaced annular end walls 63, which in turn are individually bolted to a respective one of the bearing rings 57. Accordingly, the shield 60 is rigidly fixed relative to the axis of rotation for the reel 59 afforded by the axially aligned bearings 58.

Referring again to FIG. 3, a hydraulically actuated ram 65 is operatively associated with each of the arch arms 50 to effect selective forward positioning of the reel relative to the blade 27. Each of the rams 65 is interconnected between its respective track frame 26 by a pivot pin 66 and the pivot pin 52. A pair of hoses 67 permit selective extension and retraction of the ram 65 when connected to the pump 12 by means, not shown, and supplied with pressure fluid by suitable control valves, also not shown.

The reel 59 includes a pair of axially spaced annular end rings 70 each carrying an axially extended bearing collar 71. The end rings 70 are interconnected by a plurality of axially extended, circumferentially spaced, radially projecting vanes 72. Rigidity of the annular reel so formed is further enhanced by the provision of axially spaced ribs 73, arcuately interconnecting adjacent vanes. The spaced vanes define earth receiving cavities in conjunction with the peripheral wall 61 of the shield 60. Since the reel is adapted for selective positioning relative to the blade 27 and the blade is capable of selective elevational positioning, the reel is preferably formed at a radius smaller than the earth contacting face of the blade. The reel is also formed of rigid material, such as heavy gauge steel or the like, so as to provide sufficient weight to insure rotation of the reel, when in rolling earth engagement, incident to earth traversing movement of the vehicle 10.

A transverse conveyor is partially received within the reel 59 and is provided with an upper run 81 and a lower run 82. The upper run 81 is positioned to receive earth discharged from the chute formed by the ends 62 of the shield 68. The conveyor belt is arranged for selective power operation in either direction axially of the reel 59 by independently powered cylindrical pulleys 83 rotatably supported by the arch arms 58 and serving as longitudinal limits for the conveyor 80. A pair of side rails 84 interconnect the distal ends of the arms 51 and are disposed substantially parallel to the axis of rotation of the reel 59. A plurality of rollers 85 are rotatably supported in the side rails and are spaced longitudinally of the conveyor 80 at sufficient distances to provide support for the upper run 81. In a similar manner, a lower guide roller 86 is also rotatably mounted in the side rails 84. A pair of belt tension rollers 87 are each provided with axially extended mounting pins 88 received in vertical slots 89 provided in the side rails 84. Each of the rollers 87 engages the underside of the return run 82 of the conveyor belt and is urged into biased contact therewith by means of a tension spring 90 anchored by a pin 91.

Independent reversible power is provided for each of the pulleys 83 by substantially identical individual mechanism. Accordingly, only one of such mechanisms is here described. A reversible hydraulic motor M is enclosed within a housing and is provided with a pair of hoses 96 and a control valve 97, as illustrated in FIG. 5. The motor M is arranged in driving relation to a power transmission 98 also enclosed within the housing 95. The motor and transmission housing is supported on a bracket 99 rigidly laterally extended from a respective one of the upper arch arms 56. An output sheave 100 provided on the transmission 98 afifords power for a drive belt 101 trained thereabout. A drive sheave 102 rigidly secured in driving relation to the cylindrical pulley 83 receives power from the belt 101. Accordingly, appropriate simultaneous operation of each of the motors 95 affords alternate discharge ends for the conveyor 88 and indicated at discharge zones 183 and 104 at opposite ends of the conveyor 80 and at a first elevated level with respect to the excavating zone 31.

By reference to FIGS. 1, 2 and 5, it can be seen that a pair of laterally opposed conveyors 118 are provided in the elevating loader of the present invention. F or reasons of brevity, only one of such conveyors is described, since both are substantially identical and provide bilateral symmetry in the loader. Each of the elevating conveyors includes a rigid elongated frame 111 mounted for pivotal movement in a vertical plane. Such movement is permitted by means of a pivot pin 112 supported in a pair of spaced lugs 113 laterally projecting from the lower branch arm 55. The conveyor 110 includes a continuous belt affording an upper run 115 and a lower return run 116. The belt is trained about an inner cylindrical pulley 117 mounted for rotation about the axis of pin 112 and an outer cylindrical pulley 118 rotatably mounted in the frame 111. As in the other power means illustrated in this preferred form of the invention, a hydraulically actuated motor 120 is supported on the frame 111 and supplied with pressure fluid through hoses 121 to effect appropriate rotation thereof and to cause movement of the upper run of the conveyor belt 115 in a direction indicated by the arrow 122.

A cable 125 is anchored to each of the conveyors 118 at a point adjacent to its respective distal end, as at 126. The cable is selectively played out and retrieved by a cable winding Winch 127 driven by an hydraulic motor 128. For purposes of clarity of illustration, pressure fluid supply hoses and control valves have not been illustrated in conjunction with the motor 128. A support arch 129 is rigidly secured to the arch arms 56 and provides a foundation for the cable winding winch and the hydraulic motor 128. As can be seen more clearly in FIG. 3, each of the conveyors 11a is provided with an independently controlled cable and cable winding winch 127, thereby to effect individual selective elevation of the respective discharge ends of each of the conveyors.

Operation The operation of the described embodiment of the subject invention is believed to be readily apparent and is briefly summarized at this point. Assuming that the engine 11 is operating, the vehicle is set in motion along a predetermined path of travel. As in the case of all track-type tractors, such path of travel is normally aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vehicle, except when power is interrupted to one of the track mechanisms 15 during maneuvering of the vehicle. The blade 27 is lowered into earth engagement at a selected depth so that the cutting edge 30 excavates earth from the excavating zone 3i. The depth of the cutting edge 30 is selectively controlled by appropriate extension and retraction of the hydraulic lift rams 35.

The reel 59, due to its weight, is gravitationally biased into engagement with the earth. Accordingly, forward movement of the vehicle effects rotation of the reel about the axis afforded by the bearings 58. As viewed in FIG. 3, such reel rotation incident to earth traversing movement of the vehicle from right to left, as viewed, is in a counterclockwise direction. During such rotation, earth excavated in the zone 31 by the cutting edge 30 is urged into contact with the face of the blade 27. The reel is positioned longitudinally of the vehicle in coacting proximity to the blade by appropriate extension or retraction of the hydraulic rams 65. The position of the reel 59 relative to the blade 27 is adjustably selected to accommodate the particular type of earth being excavated. For example, in excavating heavy coherent soils, such as clay, the reel is necessarily positioned at a distance greater than that when excavating loose, sandy types of soil. In excavating the latter type, the reel must be in close proximity to the earth contacting face of the blade 27 to prevent escape of the excavated earth from the earth receiving cavities formed by the circumferentially spaced vanes 72 in conjunction with the shield 69. Accordingly, earth excavated in the zone 31 is elevated by the individual vanes of the reel in cooperation with the blade 27 and subsequently discharged through the chute formed by the ends 62 of the peripheral wall at.

The earth so elevated by the reel and discharged therefrom is deposited upon the upper run 81 of the conveyor 80. Assuming that the conveyor is being powered for movement in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 5, earth deposited upon the conveyor 80 is discharged at the zone indicated at 103. If it were not for the presence of the elevating conveyor 110 disposed below the discharge zone 1G3, earth discharged from the conveyor 80 would be deposited in a windrow at the side of the machine. However, the elevating conveyor 110 is provided in the loader of the present invention to permit loading of excavated earth into a conveying vehicle moving at a rate substantially synchronized with the vehicle ltl. The earth is discharged from the elevating conveyor 116 at a discharge zone indicated at 135 and as shown in FIG. 2, and received in a conveying vehicle, such as a truck fragmentarily illustrated at 136.

If earth is to be recovered from a windrow formation, the laterally extended wings 29 of the bulldozer blade 27 are appropriately suited to such an environment. As in the case of excavating with the blade, the depth of the cutting edge 30 is selectively controlled by means of the hydraulic rams 35.

Under certain operating conditions, the blade 27 is advantageously tipped about the transverse horizontal axis afforded by the pins 28, the degree of tipping being selected to fit soil conditions and the then current characteristics of wear of the cutting edge 30. Appropriate extension or retraction of the combined tipping and tilting rams 40 readily effects such tipping of the blade 27.

To meet certain environment requirements, it is frequently desirable to tilt the blade 27 about the longitudinal axis of the vehicle 10 in a transverse plane of reference. For example, such tilting is required to lower one end of the cutting edge 30 at a depth greater than the opposite end. To effect such tilting one of the hydraulic rams 40 is extended while the other is retracted, thus causing an unequal effective length for each of the rams 49. Consequently, the blade 27 is tilted about the longitudinal axis of the vehicle and lowers one end of the cutting edge 30 at a depth below the opposite end. Since the arch arms 50 which mount the elevating reel on the vehicle 10 are also connected to a respective one of the push arms 26 through its associated hydraulic ram 65, the axis of rotation of the reel 59 is urged toward a position substantially parallel to the cutting edge 30. At the same time, however, the flexibility of the supporting frame for the reel provided by the arch arms 50 pivotally connected to the stabilizing links 51 by the pins 52 and to the push arms 26 by means of the rams 65, permits the reel 59 to follow the general contour of the surface of the earth being excavated along the path of travel of the vehicle.

During maneuvering of the vehicle 10, as by interruption to one of the tracks 15, controlled steering of the forwardly projecting reel is accomplished by extension of the ram 65 on that side of the vehicle toward which the turn is being made while simultaneously retracting the ram 65 on the side of the vehicle away from which the turn is being made. Accordingly, the axis of rotation of the reel, which is substantially normal to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle while traversing a straight path of travel, is disposed obliquely to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle. Such selective variation of the angular relationship between the axis of rotation and the Iongitudinal axis of the vehicle permits continued loading of excavated earth during maneuvering of the vehicle 10 from a straight path of travel. Also, it should be noted that such loading during turning maneuvers is accomplished without skewing of the vanes relative to the surface of the earth. Since the reel 59 is rotated by reason of its frictional engagement with the earth, this prevention of skewing of the vanes permits a high degree of operating efficiency.

Should it be desired to lift the reel 59 out of engagement with the earth, raising of the bulldozer blade 27 by actuation of the lift rams 35 will accomplish reel elevation, upon exceeding a predetermined range of movement. The range of movement is determined by the vertical spacing between the stop blocks 32 and the lower branch arms 55. Accordingly, short radius, pivot-type turns of the loader are readily permitted by raising the reel merely by elevating the bulldozer blade 27 beyond the aforesaid predetermined range of movement.

The efficiency of the loader of the present invention is further enhanced by reason of the elevation of excavated earth in successive quantities determined by the earth receiving cavities formed by the reel vanes 72 in conjunction with the shield 60. Since the earth being elevated need not overcome the resistance of excavated earth already deposited in a receiving vessel, such as the carrying bowl of a conventional earth scraper of the bowl and apron type, the full tractive power of the vehicle 16 can be exerted in propelling the loader, excavating the earth in the zone 31, and elevating it to a level above such zone.

When the vehicle 10 resumes a straight path of travel, the hydraulic rams 65 are appropriately extended and/ or retracted so that the axis of rotation of the reel 59 is substantially normal to the axis of the vehicle. Further ver satility of the loader of the invention is illustrated by reason of the reversible power means provided for the conveyor 8th which permits discharge at either side of the vehicle of the earth excavated by the blade 27 and elevated by the reel 59. In the event that either of the elevating conveyors 110 projects at a lateral distance greater than that permitted by obstruct-ions present in the operating environment, the conveyor can be retracted laterally by appropriate retrieval of the cable 125. The winch 127 actuated by the hydraulic motor 128 is utilized in such cable retrieving and consequent elevation of the distal end of the conveyor 110. Normally, both conveyors 110 remain mounted on the vehicle to provide bilateral symmetry and a consequent balancing of the assembled loader.

As a further example of the adaptability of the loader of the present invention to contemporary vehicles, it is to be noted that the reel 59, and conveyors 80 and 114 supported in the arch arms 50, can readily be detached from the vehicle 10 by appropriate removal of the pivot pins 52. This permits full utilization of individual equipment units which may necessarily be needed for temporary purposes other than propelling the loader of the subject invention.

Although the invention has been herein shown and described in what is conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent devices and apparatus.

Having described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An elevating loader comprising a mobile vehicle; a support frame pivotally mounted on the vehicle; an earth scraping blade mounted on the frame and positioned to engage the earth in an excavating zone; earth elevating means carried by the vehicle in a position adjacent to, forwardly of, and coacting with said blade to receive earth excavated thereby and to elevate such earth to a level above said excavating zone; power means carried on the vehicle and connected to said earth scraping blade selectively to elevate the same; separate power means mounted on the vehicle and connected to said earth elevating means selectively to control the proximity of said earth elevating means relative to said blade; and conveyor means carried by the vehicle in a position to receive earth from said elevating means.

2. An elevating loader comprising a mobile vehicle having a longitudinal axis; an earth scraping blade adapted to engage the earth in an excavating zone; means mounting the blade on the vehicle and forwardly thereof in angular relation to said axis, including a pair of laterally opposed push arms; an elongated annular reel; earth elevating means circumferentially spaced about the periphery of the reel; means mounting the reel on the vehicle for ground engagement forwardly of and in coacting proximity to said blade to elevate earth excavated thereby to a first elevated level, said mounting means including a pair of laterally opposed forwardly extended arch arms individually pivotally connected at their proximal ends to a respective one of said push arms and also affording an axis of rotation for the reel which is rotated while in earth engagement incident to earth traversing movement of the vehicle; and transport means carried by the vehicle to receive earth from said earth elevating means of the reel and to discharge such earth at an outlet station.

3. The elevating load-er of claim 2 wherein said transport means include elevating means to raise said received earth to a level above said first elevating level.

4. An elevating loader compring a mobile vehicle having a longitudinal axis and adapted to traverse a selective predetermined path of travel, an elongated earth scraping blade adapted to engage the earth in a predetermined excavating zone in relation to the vehicle; a pair of laterally opposed arms forwardly extended from the vehicle, having opposite ends and being mounted at their respective proximal ends for pivotal movement in respective vertical planes about a transverse axis; means mounting the blade on the arms forwardly of the vehicle for pivotal movement about a horizontal transverse axis; power means interconnecting the blade and said arms to tip said blade about said horizontal axis; an elongated annular reel axially extended substantially coextensive with said blade and providing a plurality of circumferentially spaced axi ally extended vanes about the periphery of the reel; a pair of laterally opposed forwardly extended arch arms individually disposed on opposite sides of the vehicle and affording respective forward distal ends and rearward proximal ends; means rotatably mounting the reel on said forward distal ends of the arch arms in a position forwardly of and in coacting proximity to said blade to elevate earth excavated by the blade to a first elevated level and to discharge the earth at said level, said mounting means affording an axis of rotation for the reel disposed substantially transversely of said vehicle axis; a pair of laterally opposed stabilizing links, each individually pivotally interconnecting the rearward proximal end of a respective one of said arch arms to a respective one of said vehicle push arms; a pair of laterally opposed extensible power means, each pivotally interconnecting a respective one of said push arms and a respective rearward distal end of one of said arch arms for selective individual fore and aft movement of said arch arms whereby said reel axis of rotation is angularly skewed relative to said vehicle axis; and conveyor means carried by the vehicle in a positron to receive earth discharged from the reel.

5. An elevating loader comprising a mobile vehicle affording a longitudinal axis and adapted for movement along a selective predetermined path of travel; a support frame mounted on the vehicle, earth scraping means secured to the frame forwardly of the vehicle in earth penetrating relation in an excavating zone to cause initial elevational movement of earth from the excavating zone upon movement of the vehicle along a path of travel substantially parallel to said axis; first earth elevating means carried by the vehicle having a peripheral surface in rolling engagement upon the earth in a position forwardly of, substantially transversely coextensive with, and coacting with said earth scraping means to receive earth initially elevated thereby and to elevate such earth to a level above said excavating zone, said first elevating means having an axis of reference normally disposed transversely of said path, said scraping means having a cutting portion at the lower edge thereof lying below the lower peripheral surface of the first elevating means; second earth elevating means carried by the vehicle and positioned to receive earth from said first elevating means and to elevate such received earth toward a discharge zone; and power means carried by the vehicle and connected to said first elevating means to effect in a horizontal plane limited angular movement of said axis of the first elevating means relative to the longitudinal axis of said vehicle.

6. In an elevating loader, a mobile vehicle having a longitudinal axis and adapted for forward movement along a path of travel; an earth scraping blade disposed in earth penetrating relation in an excavating zone to cause initial elevational movement of earth from the excavating zone; means mounting the blade on the vehicle forwardly thereof in an angular relation to said axis; an elongated reel; earth elevating means circumferentially spaced about the periphery of the reel; means mounting the reel on the vehicle for rolling engagement upon the earth incident to earth traversing movement of the vehicle in a position forwardly of and in coacting proximity to said blade to elevate earth initially elevated thereby to a first elevated level above the excavating zone, said scraping blade having a cutting portion lying below the lower periphery of the reel, said mounting means affording an axis of rotation for the reel disposed substantially transversely of said vehicle axis; and power means carried by the vehicle and operatively connected to said reel mounting means to efiect selective variation of the relative angle between said reel axis and said vehicle axis.

7. In an elevating loader, a mobile vehicle having a longitudinal axis; an earth scraping blade having a cutting portion disposed in earth penetrating relation in an excavating zone to cause initial elevational movement of earth from the excavating zone during earth traversing movement; means mounting the blade on the vehicle in angular relation to said axis; an elongated reel having a plurality of earth elevating members circumferentially spaced about the periphery of the reel with the reel providing a lower peripheral portion; means mounting the reel on the vehicle for rolling engagement of the lower periphery thereof upon the earth incident to earth traversing movement of the vehicle in a position forwardly of and in coacting proximity to said blade to receive earth initially elevated thereby and further elevationally to transport such earth to a first elevated level above the cutting portion of the blade and to discharge the earth so elevated, said cutting portion being disposed below the lower peripheral portion of the reel; means carried by the vehicle and connected with the reel to eflect selective elevation of said reel relative to said earth scraping blade; and conveyor means carried by the vehicle in a position to receive earth discharged from the reel.

8. In an elevating loader, a mobile vehicle having a longitudinal axis; an earth scraping blade having a cutting portion disposed in earth penetrating relation in an excavating zone to cause initial elevational movement of earth from the excavating zone; means mounting the blade on the vehicle in angular relation to said axis; an elongated reel having a plurality of earth elevating members circumferentially spaced about the periphery of the reel with the reel providing a lower peripheral portion; means mounting the reel on the vehicle for rolling engagement of the lower peripheral portion upon the earth incident to earth traversing movement in a position forwardly of and in coacting proximity to said blade to receive earth initially elevated thereby and further elevationally to transport such earth to a first elevated level above the cutting portion of the blade and to discharge the earth so elevated, said cutting portion being disposed below the lower peripheral portion of the reel, said mounting means affording an axis of rotation for the reel disposed substantially transversely of said vehicle axis; power means carried by the vehicle and operatively connected to said reel mounting means to effect selective variation of the relative angle between said reel axis and said vehicle axis; means carried by the vehicle and connected with the reel to eifect selective elevation of said reel; and conveyor means carried by the vehicle in a position to receive earth discharged from the reel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 829,882 8/ 1906 Mathers 37-97 1,658,398 2/1928 Seaman 37-108 X 2,055,176 9/1936 Lang 37-9 2,404,123 7/1946 Clark 37-9 3,059,356 10/1962 Lorang 37-144 3,091,873 6/1963 West 37-143 3,106,793 10/1963 Savage 37-143 3,119,193 1/1964 Herschberger 37-143 FOREIGN PATENTS 802,227 10/1958 Great Britain.

553,415 12/1956 Italy.

116,210 12/ 1958 U.S.S.R.

ABRAHAM G. STONE, Primary Examiner.

BENJAMIN HERSH, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3690023 *Jan 16, 1970Sep 12, 1972Foster Miller AssTrencher-scraper machine
US4057917 *Mar 30, 1976Nov 15, 1977Burrows Norman BMethod of padding pipe
US5120433 *Jul 10, 1991Jun 9, 1992Ozzie's Pipeline Padder, Inc.Pipeline padding apparatus
US5195260 *Jun 15, 1990Mar 23, 1993Mark OsadchukPipeline padding apparatus
US5261171 *Mar 23, 1992Nov 16, 1993Bishop William BPipeline padding machine attachment for a vehicle
US5363574 *Mar 22, 1993Nov 15, 1994Mark OsadchukPipeline padding apparatus
US5421108 *Feb 18, 1993Jun 6, 1995Capitan Trencher Corp.High volume pipe padding machine
US6125558 *Apr 12, 1995Oct 3, 2000Capitan Trencher Corp.High volume pipe padding machine
DE3115631A1 *Apr 18, 1981Nov 4, 1982Heitkamp Gmbh EApparatus for picking up and conveying excavated and bulk material
EP0197833A1 *Mar 24, 1986Oct 15, 1986Faye IndustriePublic works machine such as a scraper-loader
Classifications
U.S. Classification37/190, 37/97, 37/142.5
International ClassificationE02F7/02, E02F3/348
Cooperative ClassificationE02F7/02, E02F3/3483
European ClassificationE02F7/02, E02F3/348B