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Publication numberUS3224489 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1965
Filing dateMar 14, 1963
Priority dateMar 14, 1963
Publication numberUS 3224489 A, US 3224489A, US-A-3224489, US3224489 A, US3224489A
InventorsHaberthier Vincent G
Original AssigneeHaberthier Vincent G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Room divider
US 3224489 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 21, 1965 v. G. HABERTHIER ,4

ROOM DIVIDER Filed March 14, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR [7a l Vincenf G. Haberfhier a 5 BY ATTORNEYS Dec. 21, 1965 v, HABERTHlER 3,224,489

ROOM DIVIDER Filed March 14, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Vi n cenf G. H aberfhier 3 I I n B 2'0 0 I30 I4 g ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 3,224,489 Patented Dec. 21, 1965 3,224,489 ROOM DIVIDER Vincent G. Haberthier, R0. Box 204, Limon, Colo. Filed Mar. 14, 1963, Ser. No. 265,249 Claims. (Cl. 160l35) This invention relates to demountable or collapsible furniture.

Ornamental folding screens are extensively used in interior decoration, particularly where visual separation or division of areas is desired. Three panel screens are quite common and other pluralities up to six are used to a less degree because of extra weight and difliculty of manipulation. Most folding screens are light enough to be carried from one location to another without undue effort, and this has the advantage of easy removal from an established location where full use of the space in such location is required, either on a temporary or permanent basis.

Such folding screens have little utility value other than as decoration and in providing a temporary partition. In addition, such screens are not stable and may be upset by wind gusts, impact with moving bodies or objects, or other causes. Where the face of the panels is a fabric, serious damage frequently results from such upsets.

The present invention provides an innovation in interior decoration by combining utility features in a folding screen affording a Wide variety of arrangements and decorative effects in a stable but easily demountable structural assembly. The stability of the assembly is provided by an interlocked console portion which may be used as a server, desk, or article support. When desired, consoles may be mounted on fore and aft portions of the assembly, and each portion may be finished and decorated to harmonize with the area it faces. Variations in the interlocking arrangement permit selective shaping of the assembly including complete circumferential enclosures functioning as cabinets, closets or storage containers, or open shapes may be used as room dividers, or as decorative utility articles placed against walls, or fitted in corners of a room.

It is an object of my invention to provide an ornamental screen and console assembly formed of lightweight components which are easily manipulated and transported, which may be stored in a small space when not in use, and which may be partially disassembled and rearranged in a quick and easy manner.

Another object of my invention is to provide an ornamental screen and console assembly which may be fabricated with a variety of materials in a choice of color and decorative effects to harmonize with the color and decoration of the areas faced on opposite sides or faces of the assembly.

A further object of the invention is to provide an ornamental screen and console assembly having hinged panel portions selectively interlocked with demountable fore and aft console portions.

Other objects reside in novel details of construction and novel combinations and arrangements of parts, all of which will be set forth in detail in the course of the following description.

The practice of my invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings illustrating typical structural arrangements and installations. In the drawings, in the several views of which like parts bear similar reference numerals.

FIG. 1 is an isometric View showing a typical six panel assembly arranged as a room divider with provision for article support along both faces of the assembly;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the assembly shown in FIG. 1 and drawn to a reduced scale;

FIG. 3 is a section taken along the line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of another assembly arrangement providing an enclosure;

FIG. 5 is a rear elevation of a typical panel unit of the type utilized in the assemblies of FIGS. 1 and 4;

FIG. 6 is a front elevation of the panel of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 7 is a section taken along the line 77 of FIG. 6 and drawn to an enlarged scale.

FIG. 1 depicts a typical assembly utilized in the practice of my invention that is particularly suited for a use as a room divider. The screen 11 is formed of a plurality of panels 12 in hinged connection as shown at 15 and arranged in groups. One group of two forms a central portion 11a, individual panels 12 form the end portions 11b of the screen, and single panels 12 form the intermediate portion between the central and end portions.

Each panel has a forward and rear face in different color combinations and bearing different ornamentation, preferably selected to harmonize with the decor in the room area toward which the respective faces are directed. The panel 12 is formed by forward and rear frame members 13a and 1312 (FIG. 3) between which a sheet or strip 13x of screen material is held. Fastening means, preferably a horizontally disposed cleat 14a, extend across the forward face 13a of each panel and similar fastening means 14b extend across the rear face 13b for securing a deck or console member in the assembly and providing stabilizing support for the screen.

As shown, the several fastening means 14a and 14b are in a common plane and at a common elevation, but the fastening means on face 13:: may be at a different elevation than the fastening means on face 13b when use requirements make such an arrangement preferable. The deck member 16 in FIG. 1 has its rear end shaped to establish the angular relationship of the groups of panels 11a, 11b and 110 and its forward end is substantially parallel thereto as best shown in FIG. 2. Fastening means 17a extend along the rear end 16a and sides 16b of panel 16 for joining with the fastening means 14a, thereby holding the adjoining panels 12 in fixed relation to deck 16.

In the arrangement shown in FIG. 1, the interfitting cleats provide a friction grip which prevents wobble or tilting. However, the outer edge of the deck 16 is disposed at a substantial distance from the supporting panels 12 and may tend to sag to a slight degree under the weight of heavy objects supported on its top surface. Optionally, upright supports 19 may be mounted in the base portion of the central panels 11a and connect with deck 16 at its outer corners to provide additional support.

Another deck member 18 carrying fastening means such as cleats 17b is fitted in the cleats 1412 along the rear face 13!) of the respective panels 12 and provides another stabilizing support for the assembly. The total deck area of the assembly provides substantial space for article support and may be used for utilitarian purposes, such as food and beverage preparation and service, as well as regular support of objects placed thereon for continuing usage, such as clocks, phone instruments, sound transmission units or the like, and items of decor such as glass ware, pottery and art objects.

Another type of assembly utilizing a plurality of panels 12 in hinged conection has been shown in FIG. 4. In this assembly, the panels 12 are arranged to form a complete enclosure which may be used as a wardrobe, storage container or the like. Three hinged connections are provided and at a fourth corner 23 the hinging is omitted. Likewise, fastening means are omitted on the outer surface of the panels, or removed when the screen is to have multi-purpose usage, and the fastening means 14x on the inner surface are disposed in a common plane. A deck 22 has cooperating fastening means, such as cleats, disposed along its ends and locks or holds opposite sides of the assembly in fixed relation. Panel 12x abutting shelf 22 is thus free to swing about its hinges 15 to provide access to the interior as required.

One of the distinctive features of the present invention is the provision of multiple panel screens of lightweight construction adapted to be disposed in different angular relations and interfitted with a deck or console member to provide a stabilizing support for the screen assembly, and having a utilitarian function as Well. The assemblies shown in the drawings are merely representative of the arrangements that may be utilized, and by providing a plurality of diiferently shaped deck members the screen panels may be moved into different arrangements and held securely in such arrangements by interfitting connection with a selected deck shaped to provide such connection. FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 illustrate a typical panel construction. While a variety of materials may be utilized in fabricating the panels, I prefer to use a wooden framework and a decorated fabric facing material. As shown in FIG. 7, the panel framework comprises front and back strips of wood, such as plywood, with the fabric stretched, fastened and clamped between the strips. A variety of fabrics are suitable for such usage, such as canvas, buckram, silk or nylon strips.

In fabricating, the forward and rearward framing portions are assembled by joining in any suitable manner such as glued tongue and groove joints. A strip of selected fabric is cut to conform to the framework, contour and dimension and is tacked along one edge to one of the framing sections. It is then drawn and tacked along the four sides of the framework after which the front and rear framing sections are joined as by gluing, nailing or with screws to form the panel as an integral structure.

The faces 13a and 13b of the panel are next decorated by application of an ornamentation material such as a plaster composition. Where both faces 13a and 13b are to be so ornamented, a special type of plaster composition will be used to prevent the peeling of the plaster from one face of the panel while the plaster is being applied to the opposite face. I have found that a mixture of Durhams patching plaster and Elmers glue mixed approximately in equal parts with sufficient water added to produce the desired wet plaster consistency will effectively hold during application and on setting provides a durable ornamentation.

The consistency of the plaster to be applied to the panel will vary somewhat according to the method of application. It may be applied by brush, in which case a rather watery consistency is desirable for easy application. If it is to be applied by trowel or a putty knife, a sticky consistency is preferable and the amount of water added will be reduced substantially to provide the proper condition. In all such applications the plaster mix may include color pigments if desired. After application by the methods described, the mixture will dry rather quickly at ambient temperatures and once dried has a tenacious bond with the supporting fabric.

For many purposes it will be preferable not to include color pigment to the plaster mix and to leave the choice of color to the purchaser. Various paints, lacquers, and similar coloring agents may be applied to both the wooden framework members and the panel facing. Where lightweight fabrics are employed they usually will not be colored after installation, and are provided in selected colors for harmonizing wtih the colors applied to the other portions of the panel. As noted previously, it will be desirable in most instances to have difierent ornamentation and color combinations on the front and rear faces of the panel, although good decorator effects may be provided by pre-selecting color combinations and completing the decorations of the panel in the original fabrication.

Another feature of the screen assembly of my invention is the provision for a hinging connection of panels along their sides. Preferably such hinges have a removable pin portion permitting quick and easy assembly and dis assembly. This permits adding or removing panels to provide any desired plurality, and in many instances the owner will use one plurality when the screen is placed in one location and a different plurality when it is moved to a different location.

In merchandising, the components of s screen assembly may be stored and shipped in containers such as cardboard boxes or cartons with a specified number of panels included. After purchase, the user may retain the carton for storage of spare parts, including extra panels and decks, so that when the assembled screen is moved from one location to another it may be partially disassembled, rearranged and assembled for the use requirements of the new location.

Changes and modifications may be availed of within the scope of the invention as set forth in the hereunto appended claims.

I claim:

1. A demountable ornamental screen and console combination comprising a plurality of upright screen panels hingedly joined to form an integral assembly disposed in a plurality of converging planes, cleat means disposed on each of said panels at a common elevation, at least one shelf member having cleat means, the cleat means of said panels and said shelf member including substantially continuous portions extending along the adjoining portions of said panels and said shelf member and being fitted together in frictional interfitting relation to detachably connect said shelf member to said panels so as to bridge a face of said panel assembly and hold the panel assembly in a stabilized configuration.

2. A demountable ornamental screen and console combination comprising a plurality of upright screen panels hingedly joined to form an integral assembly disposed in a plurality of converging planes forming a box-like enclosure, cleat means connected to each of said panels at a common elevation, a box-like shelf member having cleat means, the cleat means of said panels and said shelf members including substantially continuous portions extending along the adjoining portions of said panels and said shelf member and being fitted together in frictional interfitting relation to detachably connect said shelf member to said panels so as to bridge the enclosure and hold the panels in a stabilized configuration.

3. A demountable ornamental screen and console combination comprising a plurality of upright screen panels hingedly joined to form an integral assembly disposed in a plurality of converging planes, cleat means disposed on each of said panels extending outwardly and upwardly therefrom forming a substantially continuous channel of upper horizontal and vertical supporting surfaces at a common elevation, at least one shelf member having cleat means extending downwardly and forming a substantially continuous surface along at least one side and end thereof, the cleat means of said shelf member being fitted together in frictional interfitting relation with said supporting surfaces to detachably connect said shelf member to said panels so as to bridge a face of said panel assembly and hold the panel assembly in a stabilized configuration.

4. A demountable ornamental screen and console combination comprising a plurality of upright screen panels hingedly joined to form an integral assembly disposed in a plurality of converging planes, cleat means disposed on each of said panels at a common elevation, at least one shelf member having cleat means, the cleat means of said panels and said shelf member including substantially continuous portions extending along the adjoining portions of said panels and said shelf member and being fitted together in frictional interfitting relation to detachably connect said shelf member to said panels so as to bridge a face of said panel assembly and hold the panel assembly in a stabilized configuration, and a plurality of spaced upright braces detachably secured to base portions of said panels to outwardly extended portions of said shelf so as to prevent tilting of said shelf member.

5. A demountable ornamental screen and console combination comprising a plurality of upright screen panels hingedly joined to form an integral assembly disposed in a plurality of converging planes, cleat means disposed on each of said panels at a common elevation at their forward and rearward faces, a pair of shelf members each having cleat means, the cleat means of said panels and said shelf members including substantially continuous portions extending along the adjoining portions of said panels and said shelf members and being fitted together in frictional interfitting relation to detachably connect said shelf 6 members to said panels at said forward and rearward faces, respectively, so as to bridge said faces of said panel assembly and hold the panel assembly in a stabilized configuration.

References Cited by the Examiner HARRISON R. MOSELEY, Primary Examiner.

CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US510427 *Aug 8, 1892Dec 12, 1893 Voting booth
US2771334 *Jun 11, 1953Nov 20, 1956Bennett T GriggsPortable bar
US2784779 *Dec 27, 1954Mar 12, 1957Edward LajzaCollapsible wind-break
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3418765 *Aug 15, 1966Dec 31, 1968Miller Herman IncCoordinated system for activity isolation
US3828492 *May 6, 1970Aug 13, 1974Borgos JStructural module
US4043086 *Apr 21, 1976Aug 23, 1977Container Corporation Of AmericaStructure for exhibition purposes
US4087144 *Aug 2, 1976May 2, 1978Consumer Idea Centers, Inc.Portable booth
US4246951 *Jan 15, 1979Jan 27, 1981Givens Ray KValance and cornice frames
US4334571 *May 19, 1980Jun 15, 1982Heller Patricia SScreen and shelving system
US4467854 *Dec 21, 1981Aug 28, 1984Godfrey H GlennConnector for display systems
US4478467 *Dec 27, 1982Oct 23, 1984Tyndall Howard WPortable workshop
US4790609 *Jun 22, 1982Dec 13, 1988Richard GuyCombination foldable-screen room divider and curio cabinet
US5673827 *Sep 24, 1996Oct 7, 1997Lamberti; JohnSelf-supporting foldable portable dressing area
US6293328 *Aug 3, 2000Sep 25, 2001Donna A. FremontPortable screen
US8082971 *Oct 23, 2009Dec 27, 2011Peterson Julie MPortable partition system having modular frames, bars, and friction fit spacers
US8403021Mar 1, 2011Mar 26, 2013Julie M. PetersonPortable partition system having modular frames, bars, and friction fit spacers
US20120199049 *Feb 4, 2011Aug 9, 2012Andrea RuggieroMobile workstation
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/135, 160/351, 52/71
International ClassificationA47G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G5/00
European ClassificationA47G5/00