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Publication numberUS3224514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1965
Filing dateAug 18, 1964
Priority dateAug 18, 1964
Publication numberUS 3224514 A, US 3224514A, US-A-3224514, US3224514 A, US3224514A
InventorsKupka John J, Moses Hornstein
Original AssigneeKhg Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vibratory pile hammer
US 3224514 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

VI BRATORY PILE HAMMER 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 18, 1964 hm v my M NNP P ER U m 1 A a w H E u i u U U Dec. 21, 1965 M. HORNSTEIN ETAL 3,224,514

VIBRATORY FILE HAMMER Filed Aug. 18, 1964 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Dec. 21, 1965 Filed Aug. 18, 1964 T1121 M. HORNSTEIN ETAL VIBRATORY PILE HAMMER 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 n nnnnn nn INVENTORS. MOSES HOEMBTE/A/ JOHN J. KUPK A A TTORNV Dec. 21, 1965 M. HORNSTEIN ETAL 3,224,514

VIBRATORY PILE HAMMER 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 18, 1964 |.l.m||||l .olllllw. II I 0 ea l.l.

w M WM mH 5 5 0 M JOHN J." Kl/P/(A A TTORNEY Dec. 21, 1965 M. HORNSTEIN ETAL 3,224,514

VIBRATORY FILE HAMMER Filed Aug. 18, 1964 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 6/ II II INVENTORS. M0555 HOANS E V JOHN J: KUPKA BY J 2 ATTORNEY M. HORNSTEIN ETAL 3,224,514

Dec. 21, 1965 VIBRATORY PILE HAMMER 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Aug. 18, 1964 INVENTORS.

M0 SE 5 HOP/VS TE/N JOHN J? KUP/(A BY m gm United States Patent 3,224,514 VIBRATGRY PELE HAMMER Moses Hornstein, Merrick, Long Island, N.Y., and lohn J. Kupka, Gladstone, N..l., assignors to KHG Associates, Merrick, Long Island, N.Y., a partnership Filed Aug. 18, 1964, Ser. No. 390,345 8 Claims. (Cl. 17555) The invention herein disclosed relates to pile hammers of the vibratory type in which piling is sunk or pulled by vibratory action instead of by impact.

Special objects of the invention have been to avoid vibrating frequencies liable to endanger adjacent or surrounding property and to accomplish this without sacrificing driving power.

In a practical embodiment of the invention, this has been accomplished by combining a number of vibratory members geared together and arranged to be driven at a rate less than a frequency known to be critical, such as 800 cycles per minute and providing in the aggregate a total of vibratory force required without impractical or undue concentration of energy at one point.

By combining a plurality of vibrating elements the maximum actuating force desired is attained while keeping bearing loads at the individual units within practical limits,

Further special objects of the invention have been to provide a practical operating construction adapted to utilize available power sources.

For this purpose the vibrator has been designed so that different forms of prime movers can be readily substituted and the machine thus be operated by electric motor, steam, compressed air, internal combustion, turbine or other forms of motive power.

Further important objects of the invention have been to accomplish these results in a practical and efficient structure suitable to present day operating conditions and requirements.

The foregoing and other desirable objects have been accomplished by the above and further novel features of construction, combinations and relations of parts as hereinafter described in detail and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

The drawings accompanying and forming part of this specification illustrate a present practical embodiment of the invention but structure may be modified and changed as regards the immediate illustration, all within the true intent and scope of the invention as hereinafter defined and claimed.

FIG. 1 in the drawings is a side elevation of one of the hammers, partly broken away to show a portion of the gearing.

FIG. 2 is an elevation of the back or opposite side of the machine, partly broken away to illustrate other portions of the gearing.

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view on substantially the plane of line 33 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4- is a plan View on substantially the plane of line 44 of FIG. 3.

FIGS. 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views on a smaller scale showing how the end plates on the rotors may be turned to line up the openings therein with the cells in the rotors for changing the weights in the rotors.

FIGS. 7 and 8- are broken front and end elevations of the double form of clamp for sheet piling, on the bottom of the hammer.

FIG. 9 is a broken end elevation of the single form of clamp for H beam piling.

FIG. 10 is a cross sectional view on substantially the plane of line 101tl of FIG. 8 showing the double clamp in engagement with sheet piling.

3,224,514 Patented Dec. 21, 1965 ice FIG. 11 is a similar view showing the single clamp in engagement with an H beam, this view taken on substantially the plane of line 1111 of FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is a diagrammatic view on a smaller scale i1- lustrating the cooperative relation of the four rotors.

The body of the machine is shown in the form of a rectangular casing made up of parallel side walls 7, 8, connected by parallel front and back walls 9, 10, with top and bottom 11, 12, the top carrying the crane connection 13, and the bottom carrying the pile clamp 14.

The driving force is provided in the illustration, by steam, compressed air or gas turbine 15, mounted in readily removable relation on a supporting platform 16, built into the upper portion of the casing.

This motor is shown bolted in place at 17, and the head of the casing is shown removably bolted in place at 18, enabling quick changeover of power units.

Operation of the turbine is shown controlled by a governor 19, of conventional design and the shaft 20, of the turbine is shown as connected with the load by a coupling 21.

The load consists in this disclosure of four drums or rotors geared together and arranged in pairs 22, 23, and 24, 25, disposed one pair directly above the other.

These rotors are in the form of annular cylinders supported by roller bearings 26, on the four stationary tubular shafts 27, 28, 29, 30, each rotor having ten longitudinal cylindrical cavities or cells 31, to receive weights 32, of the same, close-fitting formation.

These weights may be of lead, or other heavy metal, such as tungsten or uranium alloys, or other heavy material and they are held in place by circular covers 33, at the ends of the rotors.

In the illustration, there are three similarly placed weights 32, in place, in each of the four rotors, all shown disposed at the bottom of the stroke.

A greater or less number of the weights may be used, depending on the degree of eccentric force desired or required.

The particular location of the weights also is a deter mining factor in application of the vibratory effort.

With the cells which are opposite the loaded cells, empty as shown, all the weight is at one side, but if some counterbalance effect is desired, one or more of the weight plugs may be placed in the cells opposite the loaded side of the rotors.

The stationary supporting shafts 27, 28, 29, 30, are shown supported by end caps 34, 35, seated in the side walls 7, 8, of the casing.

The drive gearing from the motor to the rotors is shown made up of pinion 36, on shaft 37, journalled in box 33, in line with the motor shaft 20, and connected thereto by coupling 21, meshing pinion 39, journalled in box 4%, gear 41, on countershaft 42, pinion 43, on the latter shaft in mesh with gear 44, on a second countershaft 45, and pinion 46, on the latter in mesh with gear 47, on the end of the first rotor 22, in mesh with companion gears 48, 49 on rotors 23, 24 and the latter two in mesh with gear 50 on. rotor 25, as shown in FIG. 2.

The rotors thus are all tied together, rotating in unison with weighted and light sides in the same constant running relation.

The weights are in the nature of plugs closely fitting in their seats and held against longitudinal displacement by the cover plates 33.

These end plates are rotatably adjustable on the ends of the rotors so that they may be shifted to bring openings 33 therein into register with the cells, for removal or replacement of the Weights.

When these changes have been made, the plates may be turned back into covering position and be secured by cap screws 51.

I-Iandholes 52, 53 in the side wall 7 of the casing provide necessary access for weight changing, these openings being large enough and placed intermediate the rotors of each pair to enable servicing of companion rotors through the same opening.

Removable cover plates 54, 55 are provided for these service openlngs.

One or more cross stays may be provided connecting the side walls, such as the one indicated at 56, FIGS. 1, 2 and 3.

The pile clamp 14, is shown as made up of parallel T-head rails 60, 61, secured in inverted relation on the bottom of the casing and supporting companion slides 62, 63, carrying cylinders 64, 65, operating movable clamping jaws 66, 67, in opposition to companion fixed jaws 68, 69.

These clamp cylinders are disposed at opposite sides of the hammer so as to act in opposition to each other, thus to grip the mating section-s of sheet piling 75 in balanced, opposite directions as shown in FIG. 10.

This clamp is made so that it may be quickly converted to driving H beam piling by removing the two clamp slides and replacing one clamp slide in centered position on the bottom of the casing.

FIGS. 9 and 11 illustrate this changeover in which the two supporting rails 60, 61, FIG. 8, have been released from the supporting bolts 68', 69' and one of these rails has been secured by the bolts 70, FIG. 8 in centered position supporting one of the slides carrying the companion clamp jaws for gripping an H beam 71.

The slides while adjustable and removable in respect to the supporting rails may be fixedly secured thereon through use of the bolts 72, FIG. 8, which secure the overstanding bars 73 in clamping engagement with the rail heads.

The diagrammatic views, FIGS. and 6, show how the weight confining plates on the ends of the rotors may be turned to bring the openings therein into and out of alignment with the cells in the rotors and how then changes in loading may be effected through the service openings in the side wall of the housing.

The rotors may be turned to align them with the service openings by means of a hand crank or the like.

In the example illustrated, the shaft 37 which is coupled to the motor shaft, is shown provided with a squared end 74 for engagement by a suitable hand crank or lever. The gear reduction enables this hand crank operation to bring the cells into registration with the servicing openings.

The invention provides a readily variable vibratory force compacted into a small powerful unit which may be combined with present day pile driving equipment, which can be quickly coupled to dilferent forms of piling and which may be powered by different kinds of motors which may be available.

The vibrator may be used for extracting as well as for driving purposes and, being fully enclosed, may be used for underwater as well as dry land operations, supply and exhaust hose or other suitable power connections being provided for the turbine or other motive power employed.

For ease in handling, the weights 32 are shown as having screw seats 76, FIGS. 3 and 12, in the ends thereof for engagement by a screw form of extraction key or the like.

The cross bracing afforded by struts 56 and the stationary tubular shafts for the rotors provides a solid, rigid structure fully capable of transmitting effective vibration to piles, particularly at the relatively low, safe vibrating frequencies, for example in the range up to 800 cycles per minute.

The effective vibrating force may be governed by the number of cooperatively acting vibrating units and by the variable weighting of such individual units.

What is claimed is:

l. A vibratory pile hammer, comprising in combination a base having means for coupling it in vibrating engagement with piling,

a pair of rotors journalled on said base on parallel horizontal axes in the same horizontal plane,

a motor on said base connected to drive said rotors in unison in opposite directions,

said rotors having open-ended cells in the peripheral portions of the same, parallel with the axes of rotation, and

correspondingly shaped weights seated and removably held in certain of said cells, travelling in approaching relation in the rotation of said rotors, with said base being in the form of a substantially rectangular casing containing the connected rotors and motor and in which said rotors are in the form of annular cylinders journalled on stationary tubular shafting.

2. A vibratory pile hammer, comprising in combination a base having means for coupling it in vibrating engagement with piling,

a pair of rotors journalled on said base on parallel horizontal axes in the same horizontal plane,

a motor on said base connected to drive said rotors in unison in opposite directions,

said rotors having open-ended cells in the peripheral portions of the same, parallel with the axes of rotation, and

correspondingly shaped weights seated and removably held in certain of said cells, travelling in approaching relation in the rotation of said rotors in which the open ended cells in the rotors are closed by end plates having openings to register with said cells and in which said end plates may be turned to carry said openings into and out of register with the cells.

3. The invention according to claim 2 in which said base is in the form of a casing enclosing the parts described and in which said casing has service openings between adjoining rotors and with which said openings in the end plates may register for enabling changing of the weights in the rotors.

4. A vibrator for driving or extracting piles comprising the combination of a base,

a motor on said base,

vibrating rotors on said base,

drive gearing connecting said motor with said rotors,

said rotors having cells in the peripheral portions of the same open at one end of the rotors,

plates at said ends of the rotors shiftable to cover or to uncover the open ends of said cells and weights removably seated in said cells and kept in place by said end plates.

5. The invention according to claim 4 in which said drive gearing for the rotors is located at the ends of the rotors opposite those ends on which said cover plates are mounted.

6. The invention according to claim 1 in which said stationary shafting for the rotors consists of a tubular shaft for each rotor having its opposite ends secured in stationary relation on opposite side walls of the rectangular casing.

7. A vibratory pile hammer comprising the combination of a casing,

stationary tubular shafts rigidly secured at their ends to opposite walls of said casing,

rotors journalled on said stationary shafts,

weights mounted in readily removable relation in said rotors,

a motor mounted in said casing,

drive gearing from said motor to the respective rotors,

a pile clamp at the bottom of the casing in rigid pendently of said motor to carry the cells therein within connection with said opposite walls of the casing to reach of said servicing openings in the casing. receive the full force of vibrations imparted to the casing, References Cited by the Examiner said rotor being of annular formation in surrounding 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS relation about the shafts and having cells in the peripheral portions of the same open at one end, g 7 3 said casing having servicing o lalenings providing access 3056306 10/1962 i a 74 61 to said open ends of t e ce s, said weights being insertable through said servicing 10 31OO382 8/1963 Muller 175 55 X openings into seated engagement in said cells and FOREIGN PATENTS releasable means on the ends of said rotors for clos- 1 131,102 10/1956 Framfl ing the open end of said cells over the weights in- 347,785 1/1922 Germany.

serted therein. 8. The invention according to claim 7 with means 15 MILTON A A Primary Examiner. externally of the casing for turning said rotors inde-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2867984 *Oct 21, 1955Jan 13, 1959Francois BerthetDriving or extracting piles or like members
US2955476 *Apr 23, 1956Oct 11, 1960Junkerather GewerkschaftVibrators
US3056306 *Apr 5, 1960Oct 2, 1962Ludwig MullerExciter assembly for vibratory devices
US3100382 *Mar 23, 1960Aug 13, 1963Ludwig MullerCoupler for coupling a pile member to a pile driver
DE347785C *Dec 1, 1920Jan 24, 1922Det Tekniske ForsoegsaktieselsMechanischer Hammer
FR1131102A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3375884 *Aug 16, 1965Apr 2, 1968Albert G. Bodine Jr.Sonic method and apparatus for driving casings through earthen formations
US3433311 *May 31, 1967Mar 18, 1969Lebelle Jean LPile driver and extractor with rotating eccentric masses of variable weights
US3583497 *Dec 23, 1968Jun 8, 1971Hlibowicki AdamAn improved vibrating power hammer for driving and extracting piles
US4308758 *Mar 24, 1980Jan 5, 1982Humphrey C ThomasDrive box
US4398431 *Jul 27, 1981Aug 16, 1983Melnick Harry SMechanical power transmitting system
US5549168 *Feb 6, 1995Aug 27, 1996Mgf Maschinen- Und Geraete-Fabrik GmbhPile driving apparatus
US5823272 *Nov 13, 1995Oct 20, 1998Van Halteren; TijmenVibrating hammer, more particularly for driving sheet piles into the ground
US6302222 *Apr 24, 1998Oct 16, 2001PtcDevice for the transmission and distribution of the vibration and stress exerted on objects by a vibrator to drive them into the ground
US7434890 *Mar 23, 2005Oct 14, 2008Boart Longyear Inc.Vibratory milling machine having linear reciprocating motion
US7828393Sep 30, 2008Nov 9, 2010Boart Longyear Inc.Continuous vibratory milling machine
US8056985Oct 22, 2010Nov 15, 2011Longyear Tm, Inc.Vibratory machine
US8079647Sep 18, 2008Dec 20, 2011Longyear Tm, Inc.Vibratory milling machine having linear reciprocating motion
EP1907180A1 *Mar 15, 2006Apr 9, 2008Boart Longyear Inc.Vibratory milling machine having linear reciprocating motion
WO1998053149A1 *Apr 24, 1998Nov 26, 1998Procedes Tech ConstDevice for transmitting and distributing vibration and stresses exerted by a vibrator on objects to drive them in
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/55, 74/61, 173/49
International ClassificationE02D7/00, E02D7/18
Cooperative ClassificationE02D7/18
European ClassificationE02D7/18