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Publication numberUS3224772 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1965
Filing dateMar 25, 1963
Priority dateMar 25, 1963
Publication numberUS 3224772 A, US 3224772A, US-A-3224772, US3224772 A, US3224772A
InventorsHerbert R Wells, Mary M Wells
Original AssigneeHerbert R Wells, Mary M Wells
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball game
US 3224772 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 21, 1965 ELL ETAL 3,224,772

BASEBALL GAME Filed March 25, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 .8 1 I; 4 VENTOR.

um m HERB R. LLS

F W 70 z jjzp f /II {M Y M LL5- ATTORNEY Dec. 21, 1965 R. WELLS ETAL 3,224,772

BASEBALL GAME Filed March 25, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 NVENTOR R. WELLS M RY M. WELLS BY 6Z0 ATTORNEY I HERBERT Dec. 21. 1965 H WELLS ETAL 3,224,772

BASEBALL GAME Filed March 25, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet S Q. Hi aaAo INVENTOR. HERBERT R. WELLS MARY M. WELLS ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,224,772 BASEBALL GAME Herbert R. Watts and Mary M. Wells, both of 1458 La Riata Drive, Whittier, Calif. Filed Mar. 25, 1%.), Ser. No. 267,701 3 Claims. (Cl. 273-93) The present invention relates generally to parlor games, and more particularly to games which resemble sporting events.

Parlor games have heretofore been devised in an attempt to create competitive playing conditions comparable to the sport itself. However, such games have been able to do little more than create only a small fragmentary portion of the true competitive spirt and feeling normally found in the sport.

In view of the shortcomings of prior parlor games, it has been found desirable to provide a parlor game which has many of the characteristics of the sporting event.

Also, prior parlor games have utilized simple and relatively unexciting devices of chance such as dice or simple manually operable spinners. Such instrumentalities have become so common place in parlor games that they detract considerably from the excitement and interest of such games.

In view of the foregoing, it is an object of the present invention to teach the construction of a parlor game which provides the competitive spirit and the excitement of the sporting event it is intended to resemble.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a parlor game which closely resembles the game of baseball, including the functions of hitting and catching a baseball.

Another object of this invention is to provide a parlor game as characterized above which can be played in a limited space.

Another object of this invention is to provide a parlor game structure as characterized above which provides both offensive and defensive plays which closely resemble the corresponding plays in the sport of baseball.

Another object of this invention is to teach the construction of a spinner device having a rotatable member provided with an end portion which resembles a baseball, there also being provided a manually operable striking member which resembles a bat for hitting the end portion of the rotatable member to effect rotation thereof.

Another object of this invention is to provide a parlor game as characterized above which includes a spinner device having a rotatable member provided with a magnetically permeable end portion, there also being provided a catching device in the form of a fielders glove adaptive with a magnet whereby the rotatable member can be caught and retained in any desired position.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a game having spinner devices as characterized above wherein the operation of such devices closely resembles the function and skills of the sporting event being resembled.

A further object of the present invention is to teach the construction and operation of a spinner device for parlor games which is formed in two sections so as to be usable for both offensive and defensive plays.

A further object of the present invention is to teach the construction of a parlor game and various compo nents thereof which are simple and inexpensive to manufacture, and which are rugged and dependable in operation.

The novel features which are considered characteristic of my invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The device itself, however, both as to its organization and mode of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood from the following description of specific cmbodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of the game structure;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the striking member used for operation of a spinner mechanism;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of a catching device for stopping a spinning mechanism as desired;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional View taken substantially along line 4-4 of FIGURE 3 of the drawings;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary sectional view through the game board at one of the defensive positions;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line 6-6 of FIGURE 1 of the drawings;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line 7-7 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary top plan View of the spinner device of FIGURE 7; and

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary top plan view of an indicia member for use with the spinner mechanism of FIG- URE 6.

Like reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, the game shown therein comprises a game board 20 having a playing surface 22. As shown more particularly in FIG- URES 5, 6 and 7, game board 20 may be provided with suitable support members as shown at 24 in FIGURE 5. However, the entire game board structure may be formed of metal or plastic materials rather than of wood as shown in the embodiment chosen for illustration of the present invention. In any event, due to the fact that certain components and accessories of the game are recessed below the playing surface 22, it is necessary that the game board structure be sufficiently deep to accommodate such components as hereinafter appear in greater detail.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the playing surface 22 is arranged in the form of a baseball field or diamond 2-3. Homeplate is shown at 28 while first, second, and third bases are shown at 30, 32, and 34 respectively.

As shown in FIGURES 1 and 5, each defensive position on the baseball field 26 is provided with a small figure resembling the player at that position. For instance, the defensive position of catcher is depicted by the small figure 36 behind home plate 28. In similar fashion, there are figures 38, it 42, and 44 which represent respectively the first baseman, second baseman, short stop and third baseman, such group of four players making up the usual group of infielders of a defensive team in baseball. Correspondingly, there are provided three figures in the outfield, the figures 46 and 48 representing the left fielder and center fielder in FIGURE 1.

Each of the figures described above is attached to a disk as shown at 36a, 35a, 46a, 42a, 44a, 46a, and 48a. Such disks are removable from the playing surface by means of the respective figure, but when positioned on the playing surface 22, tend to be flush or even therewith to provide a smooth continuous playing surface.

Beneath each such disk, there is provided, as shown in FIGURE 5, a square recess 5%. Embedded in such recess so as not to interfere with the disk thereover, is a magnetically permeable member 52 which fills the recess 5t) as shown in FIGURES l and 5.

Positioned about each magnetically permeable member 52 beneath the respective disk, is an indicia member 5 1- one of which is shown in FIGURE 9 of the drawings. As will hereinafter become more apparent, each member 54 is intended to be fully exposed to the players of the game upon removal of the corresponding disk. Also,

each indicia member 5 4 is formed with a square through opening 54:: for exposing the magnetically permeable member 52 associated therewith.

A spinner device or mechanism 56, as shown in FIG- URES 1 and 6 of the drawings, is operable at any one of the aforedescribed defensive positions on playing surface 22. There is only one such spinner device shown in the embodiment for illustration of the present invention, however, it is fully realized that rather than using one such mechanism for all of the various defensive positions, individual spinner devices could be provided if desired.

As shown in FIGURE 6, such spinner device 56 comprises a supporting stand or base 58 which carries a supporting post 60. Mounted on post 60 is a rotatable member 62 having an enlarged intermediate portion 62a for proper cooperation with post 62. One end of rotatable member 62 is provided with an extended portion 64 shaped to correspond to a baseball, while the other end thereof is provided with a counter weight 66. R0- tatable member 62, of course, is freely rotatable on post ea, and a spherical bearing member 68 may be provided between the supporting base 58 and the intermediate portion 620 to facilitate this function.

Attached to the underside of supporting base 58, are one or more permanent magnets, two of which are shown at 70 and 72 in FIGURE 6. Such magnets cooperate with the magnetically permeaeble member 52 at the appropriate defensive position to retain the spinner device 56 in a stationary position.

At one or more of the aforementioned positions, there may be provided suitable containers 74 for candy rewards and the like to be given to players of the parlor game under certain conditions. The embodiment shown in the drawings for illustrating the present invention includes a container at each of four defensive positions as shown at 76, 78, 3t), and 82. There is no required pattern for the location of such containers since they may be increased or decreased in number in accordance with the individual desire. However, where located, the container 74 comprises a cup shaped body portion 74a to which is attached transparent cover member 7412. The entire container is recessed beneath the playing surface 22 by any appropriate means such as the housing 84 as shown in FIGURE 6.

It may be desirable to position the reward container 74 such that a portion thereof is beneath the indicia member 54 or within a cutout formed therein at the associated defensive position. As such, it may be somewhat difficult to remove the container from its recessed position and hence a pull tab 86 may be attached to the body portion 74a of the container to facilitate removal.

It is contemplated that a reward appropriate for the game of baseball and for the offensive or defensive play performed or failed to be performed should be provided. For instance, since the name Babe Ruth is synonymous with baseball skills, it may be desirable to provide within the various containers 74 candy bars or the like bearing the name Babe Ruth. In like fashion, it is contemplated that in the event a reward is to be given to an offensive or defensive player upon the commission of an error or mistake by an opposing player, a candy reward bearing the label Butterfinger might be appropriate. In any event, it is contemplated that such variations can be incorporated as desired. In view of the fact that the containers 74 are to be provided with eatable food, they should be formed of plastic and have a tight-fitting cover for sanitary reasons.

Each indicia member 54 at the various aforedescribed defensive positions is provided with radially divided segments 54b, in each of which there is provided suitable indicia identifying a defensive play in baseball. That is, as shown in FIGURE 9 of the drawings, such segments may identify a successful play or an unsuccessful play.

Each indicia member 54 is in the form of a card whereon is printed the aforedescribed indicia, and each card is provided with indicia which is separate and distinct from the indicia on cards at other defensive positions. That is, each indicia card or member 54 is tailored to the particular defensive position so that the most appropriate numbet and kinds of successful and unsuccessful plays are provided to most closely resemble the actual sport of baseball. Thus, certain cards of indicia members 54 have a greater proportion of successful defensive plays in accordance with the usual percentages of success which prevail at the various defensive positions in a game of baseball.

Those cards or indicia members 54 which are adjacent a container 7 4 may be provided with a square notch or cutout 540 to accommodate the container if the latter is not to be partially hidden.

At the center of the infield, in the approximate position of the pitchers mound on a regulation baseball field, there is provided on playing surface 22 a spinner device Itltl shown in detail in FIGURES 1, 7 and 8.

Afiixed to the playing surface 22, in any desired manner, is a relatively large indicia member or card 102 which, as shown in FIGURE 8 of the drawings, contains a plurality of radially extending segments 1tl2a each of which contains a different offensive play in the sport of baseball. As will be readily understood by those skilled in the art, the indicia card 192 and the aforedescribed indicia card 54 may be formed in any desired manner, the only necessary result being the provision of the various segments and indicia therein. For instance, it is contemplated within the scope of this invention that such indicia and segment dividers could be painted or drawn on the playing surface 22, if desired.

For cooperation with the indicia member M92, there is provided a supporting member or post 104 which carries a rotatable member or spinner 106. The intermediate portion reel of rotatable member 1% is enlarged and formed with a through opening to accommodate post 104. Such rotatable member further comprises an extended portion N8 which may be formed integrally with intermediate 166a or may be attached thereto by any appropriate fastening means. The end of extended portion 108 is shaped to resemble a baseball 110. Such end portion is formed of resilient material for purposes which will hereinafter be described in greater detail.

To act as a counterweight for end portion 108, there is provided an extended portion or member 112 from the intermediate portion 106a. Such extended 112 may be provided with any desired symbol or device appropriate to the game of baseball as shown at 114.

To facilitate free and easy rotation of member 106, suitable bearing means 116 may be provided on post 104.

Mounted on post 1% by means of suitable fastening means such as nuts 120 is a platform 118. Such arrangement causes platform M8 to be held in a stationary position with respect to the playing surface 22.

A mounting number 122 formed of any magnetically permeable material is firmly secured to the upper surface of platform 118, the latter of which may be arcuately shaped for purposes which will hereinafter become more apparent. The mounting member 122 is intended to closely resemble, in both structure and function, the magnetically permeable members 52 beneath the various dcfensive positions as above described.

Positioned about the member 122 on the upper surface of platform 118 is an indicia member or card 54 which resembles in virtually all particulars, the various indicia members at the defensive positions as above described. The indicia member 54 on the platform 118, as will here inafter be explained, is for determining the defensive plays of the pitcher of the baseball game.

A cover member is provided for the indicia card 54 on platform 118, such cover taking the form of an armately shaped disk 124 as shown in FIGURE 7. A figure 126 of a pitcher is attached to the cover member 124 to function as a handle as above described with respect to the defensive figures on the playing surface 22. Although not mandatory for successful practice of the presout invention, it may be found desirable to provide a permanent magnet 128 in the base of the figure 126 to retain the cover 124 in proper position. Such magnet cooperates with the magnetically permeable member 122 to retain the cover member in the position shown in FIG- URE 7.

For rotation of rotatable member 106, there is provided, as shown in FIGURE 2, a striking member 130 which is shaped to resemble a baseball bat. One end of member 130 is reduced as at 1311a While the opposite end portion 1341b is enlarged to provide a firm hitting area.

In order to stop the rotatable member 62 of spinner device 56, there is provided, as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4, a stop member 132 having a handle portion 134, an intermediate portion 136 and a glove portion 138. Portion 136 is enlarged as at 13611 to fit within the glove 140 which is formed of leather, plastic, or any other suitable material for simulating a glove normally worn by players of the sport of baseball.

Embedded in the enlarged portion 136a immediately beneath the palm of the glove 140 is a permanent magnet 142 which is operable to attract and retain the magnetically permeable ball 64 on the end of rotatable member 62. As will hereinafter appear in greater detail, stopping device 132 is manually operable by a player of the subject parlor game to stop the rotatable member 62 wherever desired.

The subject game is played substantially as follows.

Initially, the participants of the game are divided into two groups somewhat analogous to the two teams which are necessary for playing the sport of baseball. Thereafter, any suitable batting order can be arranged by the offensive team, and any suitable allocation of defensive positions can 'be effected by the defensive team.

The pitcher initially rotates the rotatable member 106 of the spinner device 109. As will be readily appreciated such rotation can be either fast, slow, or moderately fast depending upon the effort exerted. Any suitable means may be employed for determining the kind of rotation or pitch to be effected by the pitcher, such as a stack of cards one ofwhich is to be drawn by the pitcher. That is, if a card indicating the next itch to be a fast one is drawn, then the pitcher rotates the rotatable member 106 at a fast rate.

With the rotatable member 1% rotating, the batter by means of striking member 13%, tries to hit the ball 111) so as to reverse the direction of rotation. When this happens, the rotatable member 1&6 rotates in the reverse direction and ultimately comes to rest. At that time, the indicia in the square 102a of the indicia card 102 where the ball 11% comes to rest is noted. Such indicia indicates the offensive play eficcted by the batter. It should be noted, that there is some skill involved in trying to hit the ball 110 with the bat 13% In fact, the ball 110 can easily be missed entirely by the batter.

Once the offensive play has been determined from the indicia card 1G2, it is then necessary to go to the defensive area of the playing surface 22 indicated by such card. That is, if the segment 102a of the indicia card 102 where the ball 110 comes to rest indicates that the ball is hit to the left fielder, the disk 46a is removed from the field by using the figure 46 as a handle. Thereafter, the spinner device 56 is positioned as shown in FIGURE 6 over the magnetically permeable member 52 at such position.

Removal of the disk 46a, of course, exposes not only the magnetically permeable member 52 but also the indicia member 54 at the left fielders osition. The indicia on such indicia member corresponds, as above explained, to the typical or average defensive plays at that position.

The batter then manually rotates the member 62 of the spinner device 56 in accordance with instructions obtained from the aforementioned segment of the segment card or indicia card 102. That is, in the event the offensive play to the left fielder is a ball which is hit very hard, then the batter must rotate the member 62 at a fast rate. Conversely, if the instructions from indicia card 102 indicate that the ball is hit at a slow rate, then the batter would rotate the member 62 at a slow speed.

In either event, the left fielder, namely the participant of the game who is then the defensive left fielder, attempts to catch the ball 64 on the end of rotatable member 62 at the segment 54]) of indicia member 54 which is most advantageous to the defensive team. That is, as seen from FIGURE 9 of the drawings, one of the segments 54b of such member 54 may indicate that the ball is caught so that the batter is out, and other segments indicate that the ball is dropped.

To catch the ball the fielder places glove 140 in the path of the ball '64 so as to cause the latter to be magnetically attracted to the magnet 14-2 in the palm of the glove 14b. in so doing the participant operates the catching device 132 from the handle portion 134. If the ball 64 is not so caught, the rota-table member 62 is free to come to rest at any one of the segments of the indicia card 54. On the other hand, if the ball is caught at the right segment, an advantage results to the defensive player.

It is also contemplated that many other facets of the game of baseball may be worked into the subject parlor game by means of appropriate stacks of cards. As for instance, the actions of base runners, umpires and coaches can be determined by appropriate separate stacks of cards. Also, pitchers may become injured and have to be replaced in which event a separate stack of cards for a relief pitcher could be brought into the game. Such cards would reflect the frequent lack of effectiveness of relief pitchers as compared to the effectiveness of starting pitchers. Thus, more slow pitches are called for by the relief pitcher than had been called for by the stack of cards for the starting pitcher.

The above explained use of spinner device 56 at the defensive position also applies to the positions of the catcher and the pitcher. In the event the indicia from member 102 identifies the offensive play as going to the pitcher, the dome shaped cover 124 is removed from the spinner device 1% by means of the figure 126. The dome shaped configuration of cover 124 is intended to resemble the curvature of the pitchers mound on a regulation playing field.

The spinner device 56 is then placed on the member 122, the magnets 70 and 72 thereafter retaining the spinner mechanism 56 in such position. The batter then rotates the rotatable member 62 as above explained and the pitcher attempts to catch the ball by means of the stopping device 132.

In the event a spectacular offensive or defensive play is effected, a reward may be appropriate. That is, as seen in FIGURES 8 and 9 of the drawings, the segments having the cutouts for accommodating the containers 74 identify a play which is to be rewarded. Thus, when rotatable member 1116 of spinner 1100 comes to rest at the appropriate place on indicia member 102 or when rotatable member 62 comes to rest at the appropriate segment on member 54, the corresponding one of the containers 74 is given to the appropriate player. The tab 86 is used for this purpose in removing the container 74 from its recessed position.

After the candy reward is removed from the container 74, a similar reward is placed therein for the next spectacular play.

The plays on which a reward is appropriate are home runs, spectacular defensive catches and the like.

Thus, the game is played for the usual 7 or 9 innings of a ball game, the winning team, of course, being the one which scores the most runs. Such play, as above explained, continues with first one team at bat and then the other team at bat. The play thuse alternates from manipulating bat 130 to hit ball to manipulating catching device 132 so as to catch ball 64. It has been determined that the skill involved in such manipulations is analogous to the corresponding skills employed in playing the sport of baseball.

Although I have shown and described certain specific embodiments of my invention, I am fully aware that many modifications thereof are possible. My invention, therefore, is not to be restricted except insofar as is necessitated by the prior art and by the spirit of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A spinner device for use in a baseball game having a gameboard formed to simulate a baseball field comprising in combination, a mounting post and support means therefor, a plurality of predetermined segments on said board about said post each of which is provided with predetermined indicia corresponding to a defensive baseball play, a spinner element rotatably mounted on said post to cooperate with said segments on said boa-rd to efiect selection of certain indicia thereon, said element comprising an elongated arm having an end portion and a ball on said end portion to simulate an actual baseball, stopping means formed to simulate a baseball glove to be used by one of the players of the game to catch the ball While the spinner element is rotating to thereby cause said spinner element to indicate the defensive baseball play, and means for spacing said ball from said gameboard to permit said baseball glove stopping means to be positioned therebetween as said spinner element rotates, whereby the player manipulating said baseball glove is required to exercise skill in catching said ball to stop said spinner element at the desired defensive play.

2. A spinner device for use in a baseball game having a gameboard formed to simulate a baseball field according to claim 1 wherein said ball is formed of magnetically permeable material and said stopping means is provided with a permanent magnet for retaining said ball once it has been caught in the baseball glove.

3. A spinner device for use in a baseball game having a gameboard formed to simulate a baseball field comprising in combination, a mounting post and support means therefor, magnetic positioning means for retaining said post and support means in any one of several locations on the gameboard, a plurality of predetermined segments at each such location on said gameboard each of which is provided with predetermined indicia corresponding to a defensive baseball play, a spinner element rotatably mounted on said post to cooperate with said segments on said board to effect selection of one of said defensive plays, a sphere formed of magnetically permeable material attached to one end of said spinner element and provided with a cover to simulate a baseball, stopping means formed to simulate a baseball glove having a permanent magnet affixed thereto for use by a player of the game to intercept said sphere while said spinner element is rotating at any desired speed correseponding to any one of various speeds of a batted ball in a baseball game, said stopping means being further provided with a handle for use by said player in positioning the glove in the path of said sphere and means for spacing said ball from said gameboard to permit said baseball glove stopping means to be positioned therebetween as said spinner element rotates, whereby the player manipulating said baseball glove is required to exercise skill in catching said ball to stop said spinner element at the desired defensive play.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 445,260 1/1891 Greminger 273-442 599,452 2/1898 Mitchell 27393 643,808 2/1900 Brewer et a1 27393 944,452 12/1909 Mack 27393 1,535,280 4/1925 Zarker 27393 1,656,943 1/1928 Firestone 273134 2,186,337 1/1940 Jackson 273--176 2,431,827 12/1947 Radio 46236 X 2,665,913 l/1954 Hlavac 273-137 2,940,216 6/1960 Koch 46-238 FOREIGN PATENTS 854,764 11/1952 Germany.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

S. FELDMAN, G. K. KITA, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3350101 *Oct 16, 1964Oct 31, 1967Forest M BishopGolf swing aid
US6419227 *Jul 7, 2000Jul 16, 2002Thomas W. BarnhardtMethod and apparatus for playing a simulated baseball game
US6419230 *Jan 5, 2000Jul 16, 2002Clinton CassSimulated baseball game and method
US7690963Feb 2, 2006Apr 6, 2010Origin Products Ltd.Play mat
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/141.00A, 273/244.1, 446/137
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0608
European ClassificationA63F7/06A1