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Publication numberUS3224785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1965
Filing dateJul 22, 1963
Priority dateJul 22, 1963
Publication numberUS 3224785 A, US 3224785A, US-A-3224785, US3224785 A, US3224785A
InventorsStevenson Gerald W
Original AssigneeStevenson Gerald W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rider stabilized roller skate provided with brake means actuated by tilting of the brake
US 3224785 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec- 21, 1965 G. w. STEVENSON 3, 85

RIDER STABILIZED ROLLER SKATE PROVIDED WITH BRAKE MEANS ACTUATED BY TILTING OF THE BRAKE Filed July 22, 1963 FIG. 6 F K INVENTOR. GERALD w. STEVENSON HG] BY ATTORNEY United States Patent Office 3,224,785 Patented Dec. 21, 1965 3,224,785 RIDER STABILIZED ROLLER SKATE PROVIDED WITH BRAKE MEANS ACTUATED BY TILTING OF THE BRAKE Gerald W. Stevenson, 507 Michigan St., Whittier, Calif. Fiied July 22, 1963, Ser. No. 2%,609 6 Claims. (Cl. 280-412) The present invention relates generally to amusement devices, and more particularly to an improved monoskate.

During the past few years the popularity of skating as a form of recreation has increased to a marked degree. Many proficient skaters, as well as others, have been seeking a type of skate that will challenge the skating ability they have acquired. A skate structure that will challenge the ability of even the most accomplished skater is the monoskate. Monoskates of a variety of designs have been devised and used to an extremely limited extent in the past, due to the fact that the majority of such devices have been crude and cumbersome, of such poor design they cannot be economically produced, and if so, would be so expensive as well as awkward to use, as to receive little or no market acceptance.

A major object of the present invention is to provide a monoskate which preferably includes two coaxially aligned flat-surfaced wheels to furnish two laterally spaced, tangential weight-bearing areas, and which may include either a hydraulic or pneumatic braking system, a pivotally actuated brake, or a combination of both.

Another object of the invention is to supply a monoskate of simple mechanical structure which can be fab ricated from standard, commercially available materials without the use of specialized equipment whereby it can be retailed at a sufficiently low price as to encourage its widespread use.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a monoskate that is more versatile in use than the standard dual-wheeled roller skate, permits the user to employ an arc-like stroke such as used in ice skating rather than the conventional straight stroke, one with which figure skating feats may be performed that are impossible with conventional roller skates, and one which provides far greater maneuverability than is possible with other skates.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a monoskate which requires special skill, balance, control, and agility on the part of the user, and one that permits the user to attain results heretofore impossible in the field of pleasure skating, racing, figure skating or like endeavors.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a monoskate that may be power-operated, if desired.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description of a first and alternate forms thereof, and from the accompanying drawing illustrating the same, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of the first form of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a front elevational view of the roller skate shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a combined vertical, cross-sectional and front elevational view of a first alternate form of the skate;

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of a second alternate form of the skate shown fitted on a skater;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevational view of the second alternate form of the device;

FIGURE 6 is a front elevational View of the second alternate form of the skate;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary transverse cross-sectional view of a portion of the braking device used on the second alternate form of the skate, taken on the line 7-7 of FIGURE 4; and

FIGURE 8 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of a portion of the braking device, taken on the line 8-8 of FIGURE 5.

With continued reference to the drawing for the general arrangement of the first form of the invention shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, it will be seen that the roller skate includes a foot plate A that is affixed by conventional means to the sole B and heel C forming a part of a shoe D. A centrally disposed, longitudinally extending flange E depends from plate A, and a central transverse opening 10 is formed therein.

A vibration dampener F is provided that is formed from a tough resilient material, such as rubber or one of the commercially available polymerized resins available for such purposes. This vibration dampener is in the form of a spool and includes a cylindrical central portion 12 disposed within the confines of the opening 10. Two circular end pieces 14 are affixed to the central portion 12 and extend outwardly around that portion of flange E adjacent the opening 10.

A central transverse bore 16 which extends through vibration dampener F is engaged by a transverse shaft 18. Two tubular spacers 20 of a rigid material are mounted on those portions of the shaft 18 on opposite sides of the dampener F, as may :best be seen in FIG- URE 2. Two washers 22 are also mounted on shaft 18 and abut against the outer ends of spacers 20. Two cylindrical rollers G are provided, the structure of which is shown to the right in FIGURE 2. Each roller G has a central transverse bore 24 extending therethrough that rotatably engages an end portion of shaft 18. Threads 30 are formed on the outer portions of shaft 18.

An enlarged outer cavity is formed in each of the rollers G and is in communication with bore 24. Two washers 28 are provided, each of which is mounted in one of the cavities 26 and abuts against the inner surface thereeof. Each washer 28 encircles an end portion of shaft 18, and the threads 30 thereof are disposed in the cavities 26, with these threaded portions being engaged by nuts 32 to removably and rotatably support the rollers G on the shaft.

For ease in balancing on the monoskates, the bore 16 is preferably located just forwardly of the instep of the sole B, as shown in FIGURE 1. A forwardly and downwardly projecting boss 34 which is formed as a part of flange E supports a downwardly inclined shaft 36, on which a roller H is mounted. Roller H is employed in making toe stands, and the like. The forward end of shaft 36 is threaded (not shown) and extends into a cavity 38 formed in the center of roller H. The forward threaded end of shaft 36 is engaged by a washer 40 and a nut 42, both of which are disposed within the confines of cavity 38.

A shaft 44 which depends from the rear end of flange E rotatably supports a second resilient roller I through which a transverse centrally disposed bore 46 extends that rotatably engages shaft 44. Bore 46 is in communication with a centrally disposed cavity 48 formed in second roller I and housing a Washer 50 and a nut 52.. Nut 52 engages a threaded end portion (not shown) of the shaft 44.

The second roller I may be utilized in making rear stands, or in some instances, may be utilized for braking purposes when brought into frictional contact with the surface 54 on which the rollers G rest. To lighten the structure of the monoskate, a number of circumferentially spaced openings 56 are preferably formed in the rollers G, as best seen in FIGURE 1. A transverse bore 58 is formed in a rear portion of flange E, preferably below the heel C (FIGURE 2), and this bore has a transverse shaft 60 extending therethrough. Shaft 60 supports two tubular spacers 62 on each side thereof, as shown in FIG- URE 2. Two arms 64 are rigidly connected to the outer end portions of shaft 60, which shaft is rotatable in the bore 58 and bores 66 of the spacers 62. Transversely aligned bores (not shown) are formed in the lower portions of arms 64 through which a shaft 68 extends. The outer threaded end portions 70 of shaft 68 are engaged by nuts 72, and a washer 74 is disposed adjacent the inner face of each of these nuts.

Two brake wheels K, only one of which is shown in FIGURE 1, are rotatably supported on the shaft 68 between the inner faces of the washers 74 and the exterior faces 76 of the arms 64. The brake wheels K are preferably formed of a resilient material, and when the first form of the invention is tilted rearwardly in the manner shown in FIGURE 4, the brake wheels are brought into forceful contact with the surface 54 whereby the brake wheels and arms 64 are pivoted forwardly to occupy the position shown in phantom line in FIGURE 1. When the brake wheels K are brought into frictional contact with surface 54 and the rollers G are rotating in a clockwise direction, the brake wheels will likewise rotate in a clockwise direction, but will tend to brake the rollers due to the frictional engagement between the upwardly moving rear portions of the rollers and the downwardly moving forward portions of the brake wheels.

A first alternate form of the invention illustrated in FIGURE 3 has certain elements common to the first form thereof just described. Those elements in the first alternate form that are the same as those of the first form are identified by the same numerals, but to which a prime has been added.

The first alternate form of the device includes a foot plate A from which a flange E depends. Flange E is afiixed to the upper portion of a rigid body 78 that includes a horizontal web 80 from which two laterally spaced legs 82 extend downwardly. Coaxially aligned, transverse bores 84 are formed in legs 82, and an outer race portion of a ball bearing assembly 88 is press fitted in each of these bores. Bearing assemblies 88 include inner race portions 90 that support a shaft 18' on the ends of which rollers G are rigidly mounted by conventional means (not shown).

A circular cavity 92 is formed in web 80 and communicates with an upwardly extending vertical bore 94. A third ball bearing assembly 96 is mounted in cavity 92, and includes an outer race 98 and an inner race 100. The outer race 98 is press fittedor otherwise mounted in cavity 92, and an end portion of a flexible drive cable 102 extends through and is rigidly connected to the inner race 100. A part of the end of cable 102 extends below inner race 100 and is rigidly connected to a first horizontally disposed beveled gear 104. Gear 106 meshes with gear 104, and is rigidly mounted on shaft 18', as best shown in FIGURE 3. When the drive cable 102 is driven by portable power means 108 carried by the user, it is possible to skate without any physical exertion other than that required to remain in a balanced position.

A second alternate form of the invention which is shown in FIGURES 4 to 8 inclusive, includes a shoe L that has a base plate M extending along the length of the lower portion thereof. A single resilient roller N, shown in detail in FIGURES and 6, is positioned under the center portion of base plate M and in longitudinal alignment. therewith. Roller N is rotatably supported on a transverse shaft 110, the end portions of which are threaded and pro-- ject outwardly from two openings 112 formed at the apex of V-shaped side frames 0. The outer threaded end portions of the shaft 110 are engaged by nuts 114 to maintain the shaft in engagement with the two side frames 0, as best seen in FIGURE 6. The upper ends of side frames 0 are affixed to the base plate M by conventional means, and if desired, these side frames may be connected by cross pieces 116 as shown.

A body P is affixed to the under side of base plate M,

rearwardly of the roller N. Body P pivotally supports two parallel laterally spaced arms 118, which in turn are pivotally connected to the sides of body P by pins 120. Transversely aligned bores are formed in the lower por tions of the two arms 118 through which a shaft 122 extends. Shaft 122 rotatably supports a resilient roller 124 between the two arms 118.

When the second alternate form of the skate is pivoted rearwardly as shown in FIGURE 4, the arms 118 and roller 124 are pivoted forwardly to contact the rear surface of the roller N and the ground surface 54 on which the second alternate form of the invention is supported. This forward pivoting of the arms 118 and roller 124 causes the forward portion of the roller 124, which is moving downwardly due to contact with the surface 54, to engage the upwardly moving rear portion of the roller N. At the point of contact between roller 124 and wheel N they are rotating in opposite directions, and the roller serves to brake the forward movement of the wheel.

A longitudinally extending bore 126 may also be formed in body P and defines a circular body shoulder 128 at the junction thereof with a counterbore 130. A piston 132 is slidably mounted in bore 126, with its associated piston rod 134 extending forwardly therefrom through the counterbore 130. A compressed helical spring 136 is disposed in bore 126 and situated between the forward face of the piston 132 and body shoulder 128. Threads 138 are formed on the rear portion of bore 126, and an externally threaded apertured plug 148 is provided which engages threads 138. Plug 140 includes a rearwardly tapering surface 142, and a tapered end 144 of a tube 146 abuts against this tapered surface. A nut 148 is provided that engages the threads 138. Nut 148 includes a tapered surface 150 that is complementary to the external surface 142 of the flared end 144, and seats thereagainst to seal the flare to the tapered surface 142.

The tube 146 extends to a conventional fitting 152 (FIGURE 5) which is in communication with the lower end of an elongate resilient bladder 154 that extends upwardly along the rear of the users leg, as can best be seen in FIGURE 4. A- number of resilient straps 156 are bonded to bladder 154 in longitudinally spaced positions thereon, and these straps serve to hold the bladder in an upwardly extending position on the users legs. When the user flexes his knees (FIGURE 4), the volume of the bladder 154 decreases, and this decrease in volume is reflected in an increase in the pressure of an hydraulic fluid 158 contained in the bladder. This fluid may be either a liquid, air or gas. As the pressure on the fluid 158 increases, the pressure on the rear face of the piston 132 is increased, and to the extent that the spring 136 is compressed, whereby the forward end of the piston rod 134 is brought into frictional engagement with the wheel N.

When the user assumes a substantially upright position, the resilience of the bladder 154 causes the bladder to assume a substantially vertical position, with a consequent increase in volume within the confines thereof. This increase in volume is reflected by a decrease in pressure on the fluid 158. As the pressure on the fluid 158 decreases, the compressive force of the spring 136 moves the piston 132 and piston rod 134 rearwardly sufficiently so that the forward end of the piston rod exerts no braking action on the wheel N.

The use and operation of the first form and alternate forms of the invention have been explained in detail and need not be repeated.

Although the present invention is fully capable of achieving the objects and providing the advantages hereinbefore mentioned, it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of the presently preferred embodiments thereof, and I do not mean to be limited to the details of construction herein shown and described, other than as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A roller skate, including:

(a) a foot plate;

(b) means for removably attaching said foot plate on the foot of a skater;

(c) a first roller disposed under said foot plate, parallel thereto and intermediately positioned between the ends thereof;

((1) means for rotatably connecting said roller to sai foot plate; and

(e) means for braking the rotation of said roller that is actuated when said skater changes the position of a portion of his body from the position said portion normally occupies when said skater is in a skating position that comprises:

(1) a longitudinally aligned cylinder disposed under said foot plate and rearwardly of said roller;

(2) a piston slidably mounted in said cylinder;

(3) a piston rod affixed to said piston and extending through an opening in the forward end of said cylinder;

(4) spring means for maintaining said piston and piston rod at positions relative to said cylinder where the forward end of said rod is rearwardly of said roller; and

(5 a closed resilient hollow body filled with fluid that is in communication with the rear interior of said cylinder, said body when even partially collapsed increasing the pressure on said liquid therein to move said piston and piston rod forwardly against the restraint of said spring means for the forward end of said rod to frictionally contact said roller and brake the same.

2. A roller skate, including:

(a) a foot plate;

(b) means for removably attaching said foot plate on the foot of a skater;

(c) two parallel laterally spaced rollers disposed under said foot plate, parallel thereto and intermediately positioned between the ends thereof;

(d) means for rotatably connecting said rollers to said foot plate including (1) a longitudinal flange that extends downwardly from said foot plate and has a transverse bore formed therein;

(2) a resilient vibration dampener disposed in said bore;

(3) a transverse shaft supported by said vibration dampener, which shaft rotatably supports said rollers on opposite ends thereof; and

(4) two tubular spacers mounted on the portions of said shaft adjacent those portions that support said rollers, with the inner ends of said spacers abutting against said vibration dampener;

(e) means for braking the rotation of said rollers that is actuated when said skater changes the position of a portion of his body from the position said portion normally occupies when said skater is in a skating position.

3. A roller skate as defined in claim 2 wherein the means for braking the rotation of said rollers comprise:

(a) two rigid arms;

(b) a transverse shaft supported from said flange, which shaft rotatably supports said arms therefrom;

(c) two rolls;

(d) means for rotatably supporting said rolls from the lower ends of said arms in longitudinal alignment with said rollers, with said skater when he pivots said foot plate rearwardly moving said arms and rolls forwardly due to contact of said rolls with the surface on which said rollers rotate and as said rolls move forwardly concurrently contacting said rollers and said surface on which said rollers rest to brake the rotation of said rollers.

4. A skate as defined in claim 3 which further includes:

(a) a shaft extending downwardly and forwardly from the forward portion of said flange; and

(b) a resilient roller rotatably supported on said shaft which is adapted to act as a revolving toe stand when said skater disposes said foot plate in a downwardly and forwardly extending position to place said roller on said shaft in contact with the surface supporting said two rollers.

5. A roller skate as defined in claim 3 which further includes:

(a) a shaft extending downwardly from the rear portion of said flange; and

(b) a resilient roller rotatably mounted on the lower extremity of said shaft, which resilient roller is adapted to act as a rear stand, as well as a brake when said skater pivots said foot plate rearwardly to bring said resilient roller into contact with the surface on which said rollers rotate.

6. A roller skate as defined in claim 3 which further includes:

(a) a shaft extending downwardly and forwardly from a forward portion of said flange;

(b) a first resilient roller rotatably supported on said shaft, which first roller is adapted to serve as a revolving toe stand when said skater pivots said foot plate to a position where said first roller is in contact with the surface on which said rollers rotate;

(c) a second shaft extending downwardly from a rear extremity of said flange; and

(d) a second resilient roller rotatably supported on said second shaft, which second roller is adapted to serve as a rear stand and brake when said skater pivots said foot plate downwardly and rearwardly to place said second resilient roller in contact with the surface on which said rollers rotate.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 577,628 2/ 1897 Segerberg 280-11.20 X 1,421,532 7/1922 Muck 280-112 2,179,592 11/1939 Goettie -11.2 2,551,122 5/1951 Hayner 280-112 2,625,229 1/ 1953 VanVoorhees 180-5 2,857,008 10/1958 Pirello 180-1 FOREIGN PATENTS 598,429 5/ 1960 Canada.

716,228 10/ 1931 France.

230,621 2/1911 Germany.

494,395 3/ 1930 Germany.

513,031 12/ 1937 Great Britain.

104,820 5/ 1924 Switzerland.

5 A. HARRY LEVY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.206, 188/84, 180/180, 188/29, 280/11.24, 280/11.25, 188/4.00B, 280/11.28, 280/11.216
International ClassificationA63C17/14, A63C17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/1409
European ClassificationA63C17/14B