Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3224822 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 21, 1965
Filing dateNov 8, 1963
Priority dateNov 8, 1963
Publication numberUS 3224822 A, US 3224822A, US-A-3224822, US3224822 A, US3224822A
InventorsJack A Kirby
Original AssigneeBi Fresh Dispenser Co, Northwest Bi Fresh Dispenser C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reusable display and dispensing container
US 3224822 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 21, 1965 J. A. KIRBY 3,224,822

REUSABLE DISPLAY AND DISPENSING CONTAINER Filed Nov. 8, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

JACK A. KI R BY BY rm.

ATTORNEY Dec. 21, 1965 J. A. KlRBY REUSABLE DISPLAY AND DISPENSING CONTAINER 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 8, 1963 4 2 2 3 A a I I I l 1 {1|\.|Il I l I I I I 5 a m m n W 2 2 4/" w 4 W n b 8 4 n 2 m a a 1 I. T 9 l V 2 2 5/: 7 5 W J 3 2 a a 2 5, I w/ H a z 3 E 2 III I 1 1 MI 1 I V. w r 2 ///m /3 W 5 29 4 n 4 I 2 RN w 2 .H .l W m 3 b I ll 2 3 1 n 6 w 6 m 8 F 2 F l I l I l i 1 1 I 2 4 6 4 4 4 FIG. 4

I NVEN TOR.

JACK A. KIRBY ATTORNEY Dec. 21, 1965 J. A. KIRBY 3,224,822

REUSABLE DISPLAY ANDDISPENSING CONTAINER Filed Nov. 8,. .1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 H6 5 FIG. 6

26 4 24 Will/p, 30%

FIG. 7 FIG 8 FIG. 9 FIG. IO

sye s\ 1 g6! 64 e4 15 INVENTOR JACK A. KIRBY MQ7WM.

ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,224,822 REUSABLE DISPLAY AND DTSIPENSING CONTAINER Jack A. Kirby, Stockton, Calih, assignor, by mesne assignmerits, of one-half to Bi/ fresh Dispenser Co., and onehalf to Northwest Bi/ fresh Dispenser Co., both of Reno,

Nev., both corporations of Nevada Filed Nov. 8, 1963, Ser. No. 322,280 5 Claims. (Cl. 312-71) This invention relates to reusable containers intended particularly for food display and dispensing purposes and more particularly to reusable containers which may be either set up to retain, ship, display and dispense a prodnet or disengaged into fiat form for shipping, storage and sterilization. Particular application is found in packaged perishable food products for the retail trade where the cost of spoilage and servicing justifies the expense of reusable containers which per se help to reduce the loss.

The present invention provides a display container, especially suited for perishables, which can be easily returned to the packaging plant in disengaged flat form. This is made possible by providing a blank formed as a single plastic sheet which folds into a box. The various panels forming the top, sides, bottom and ends are molded or thermo-formed integrally with a web less than 0.10 inch thick to provide suitable pliable hinges, and the holding of the blank in set up form is made with integral latch and catch members formed in the plastic sheet at the free edges. Compression means is provided within the container, so that the product is gently forced forwardly in the display. Cooperating tabs and recesses are also provided for stacking the containers in a staggered formation. The forward end of each container is partially cut away, along with segments of the side sections, to provide an entrance for manually removing the products which, usually will be regular shaped packages of meat, vegetables, frozen foods, etc. Further details are disclosed at length hereinafter.

In the distribution of packaged meat, vegetables, frozen foods and other perishable products to retail outlets and from there to the consumer, the reduction and eventual elimination of spoilage has been a major problem. Spoilage includes not only products actually unfit because of bacteriological decay, but also suspect products which have remained so long on display they are disposed of even though at the time they are not known to be unfit for human consumption. The spoilage problem is perpetuated by the merchandising habits of consumers who almost without exception select, not the topmost or last package, but some intermediate package which is neither first nor last, in an apparent effort to obtain fresh merchandise. Consequently the topmost package, or a number of topmost packages, as well as the last one in the box, are left to an age never determinable in undated packages, while the consumer avidly paws through additional cartons or containers for fresher products.

The present invention eliminates the spoilage problem by providing a display container having a spring loaded movable back wall which gently forces the packages forward as the front packages are removed. The fronts of the containers open at an angle so that only the front one or two packages is available for selection and the remainder of the goods is protected from view and handling. To provide maximum choice with minimum display space requirements, the containers are stacked in slanting displays so that a plurality of choices are available to the consumer. This makes it much more probable that a customer will select the first or second package, since the neat appearance invites the thought that all products are equally fresh. No dog eared packages, no discoloration ICC of older products, no here-and-there piles of different packages containing the same product are present to impress one with images of stale and shop-worn packages.

Upon dispensing and sale of the contents, the empty containers are removed from the stack by disengaging stacking slots and tabs from adjacent containers, as described hereinafter. Each empty container is then returned to the flat position by separating walls along the separably joined edges. The several knocked down containers may then be compactly returned to the wholesaler or packer for sterilization, packaging and reuse.

There are a number of advantages which this invention provides to the packer or wholesaler, to the retailer and to the consumer.

At the wholesale level it provides tremendous savings in the cost of boxes for pre-packed luncheon meats and the like because the packer or wholesaler saves on the ultimate cost of containers. The containers of the present invention may be used over and over again so that although the initial cost per container is higher, the eventual container cost is very much reduced. There is better product protection provided in transit. The very nature of the plastic construction provides a more rigid and yet resilient container than can be provided by paper, which is the normal material used for such containers, and the losses from ruptured or damaged cartons is all but eliminated. The container provides great and substantial savings in labor for service drivers and delivery maintenance where by actual count the provision of the container of the present invention reduces the normal handling such containers by more than fifty percent. The Wholesaler is saved the product return loss due to bad rotation of products by the retailer. The quality and standing of the wholesaler is increased throughout the industry by selling fresher items and displaying the products better, thus gaining substantial consumer confidence.

On the retail level, the container of the present invention offers a sure and simple solution to product rotation and the losses from improper rotation regardless of the causes. The containers provide a better appearnce when positioned within the refrigerated holding means for display to the ultimate consumer. The exposure of only a portion of the packaged products prevents discoloration of the foods from being continuously subject to the lighting within the refrigerated holder.

There is also better conductivity of the refrigeration due to the characteristics of the plastic used in making the container. Because of the easy conductivity there is no sweating in or out of the package due to the refrigeration. Furthermore, keeping all but the first one or two packages covered at all times in the container keeps off the effects of the air currents resulting from the blowing of the fans within the refrigerated holding means.

The use of the containers of the present invention require less space in the refrigerated holder and displays the products better. Thus, the retailer is required to carry less inventory than is normally now considered desirable. In preparing luncheon meats and the like for display and sale, the retailer must have someone to unpack the meats and arrange the display in the refrigerated holding means. The use of the present invention not only reduces and eliminates most of this handling, but provides a display without any other effort by a clerk than the proper positioning within the refrigerated holding means. The use of the container of the present invention has resulted in a saving of more than eight hours a week in the handling of luncheon rneats.

With the container of the present invention there are no boxes to open and no boxes to burn or otherwise dispose of.

The use of the container of the present invention pr0- vides more profit because the pre-packaged foods are dispensed attractively and invite purchase as well as delivering to the customer a fresher and tastier product which cannot be displaced by customer handling.

The customer is the recipient of all of these benefits because of the assurance of fresher and tastier products, economically and attractively displayed and dispensed.

Further objects are to provide a construction of maximum simplicity, economy and ease of assembly and disassembly, also such further objects, advantages and capabilities as will fully appear and as are inherently possessed by the device and invention described herein.

The invention further resides in the combination, construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and while there is shown therein a preferred embodiment thereof, it is to be understood that the same is illustrative of the invention and that the invention is capable of modification and change and comprehends other details of construction without departing from the spirit thereof or the scope of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the containers of the invention in stacked-stepped relation as they would appear at the retail outlet;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of a single container, with a portion of one side partly broken away to show the interior, showing the same fully assembled and as used;

FIGURE 3 is a top plan view of the flat, formed blank having integral sides, top, bottom and ends;

FIGURE 4 is an end elevational view of the blank of FIGURE 3 with the projections from both the upper or top surface and the bottom or under surface shown in exaggerated scale;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the hinge sections of the container;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the integral catch for joining the abutting edges of the container;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the integral latch which engages the catch for joining the abutting edges of the container;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the restraining tabs for the product advancing means;

FIGURE 9 is a plan view of the compressor plate; and

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational view of the said compressor plate.

In the practice of the invention a plastic material is used to form the parts of the container-dispenser, which is capable of being molded or otherwise thermo-formed to produce an integrally formed permanent structure. Various types and grades of commercial materials may be used, but the polyolefins such as polypropylene have been found particularly suited for obtaining the desired strength and rigidity with minimum thickness, in addition to other required conditions. While the tolerances are demanding, i.e., 10 to 50 mils, only ordinary skills now available in the art are needed to form the parts.

Referring now particularly to the drawings, and particularly FIGURE 1, there will be seen in perspective two hollow rectangular display containers 11 of the present invention, set up as a display as in a conventional refrigerated case of a grocery store. FIGURE 2 shows a side elevation of a partially loaded container-dispenser. The container 11 consists of an integral unitary folded blank having a bottom 12, sidewalls 13 and 14, top 16, front 17, and a back 18. Within the container is a separate compressor or retaining wall 19 and a spring 21 as revealed in FIGURE 2. In assembling and disassembling the formed blank shown in FIGURE 3, the top 16 engages or separates from sidewall 14 along longitudinal edge 22 in a manner which will be discussed hereinafter, and' both front 17 and back 18 similarly engage or separate along side edges of the juncture with sidewalls 13 and 14. The remaining longitudinal edges between sides 13 and 14 and bottom 12, between side 13 and top 16, and also the transverse edges between front and back 17 and 18 and bottom 12 are formed with an integral hinge, as will also be discussed. The entire display container 11, including the spring 21 and retaining wall 19, is made from plastic in the preferred embodiment. It has been found that a wall thickness of about 50 to 75 mils gives suitable strength and rigidity, yet economizes plastic. However, other thicknesses may be used if desired and materials other than plastics of like physical properties are used.

The formed plastic blank for the container 11 is seen in FIGURE 3. In FIGURE 3 the blank is face up, inasmuch as the reverse side is co-planar, except for the portions noted.

It will be seen that the integrally connected sides, top, bottom and ends are all generally rectangular in shape. The fore part of each of the sides, however, is cut back at the exposed corner forming the inwardly and upwardly curved shapes 15. The tab forming front 17 has an altitude equal to the remaining portions 13:: and 14a of the side portions 13 and 14. The top member 16 is somewhat shorter than the bottom 12, corresponding to the remaining length or dimension 13b and 14b of the said.

sides.

As mentioned earlier, an integral hinge 23 is formed in and with the plastic blank and connects sides 13 and 14 with bottom 12, side 13 with top 16, and front and back 17 and 18 with bottom 12. The hinge 23 is shown in enlarged cross section in FIGURE 5 The sheet of plastic 24 is formed with a groove 26 which is deep enough that the remaining connecting web 27 of plastic is less than 20 mils in thickness and preferably about 15 mils thick. The width of the groove should preferably be about 30 mils for a plastic sheet 60 mils in thickness. In order to provide for the hinge to bend inwardly through an angle of each of the sides 28 and 29 of the groove 26 is beveled at an angle of at least 45 so they form a contacting abutment when the joined portions are moved in a perpendicular relation. There is sufiicient width at the bottom of the groove 26 to accommodate the thickness of the hinge in the bending.

In the formed blank shown in FIGURE 3, integrally formed means are also provided for joining the exposed edges to form the assembled container of FIGURES l and 2. Enlarged details of catch and latch arrangement is shown in FIGURES 6 and 7. The catch is shown in FIGURE 6 and consists of the wed or sheet 24 formed with an upstanding rounded protuberance or half bead 32 continuously along an appropriate marginal edge on the under or outer face of the sheet 24. The protuberance or half head 32 is spaced a suflicient distance from the surface to permit engagement with the latch means 42. The web or sheet 24 is the same plastic sheet, of course, forming sides 13 and 14, front 17 and back 18. The catch 30 which is formed along the underface at edge 34 of side 14, edges 36 and 38 of the back 18 and edges 39 and 41 of the front 17, is actually quite small and is hardly noticeable in the commercial structure.

The latch generally designated 42 and shown in FIG- URE 7, is also formed integrally with the sheet or web 24 along the appropriate marginal edges thereof. The edge 44, for example, is molded with a continuous vertical riser 46 which is substantially at right angles to the plane of the sheet 24. This is formed on the upper face of the sheet 24 and will therefore be on the inside of the container when the panels are locked together. At the top of the riser 46 is an inwardly directed curved face 48 which is undercut with a reverse curve 49 until it reaches the plane of the upper face of the sheet or web 24. The inner or reverse curve 49 is substantially complementary to the protuberance or half bead 32 of the catch portion 38. Inwardly spaced from the riser 46' is a vertical stop 51 which likewise extends upwardly at right angles from the upper face of sheet 24 and has a shaped outer surface 56 to serve as guiding means for guiding the edge 33 for example, into the locking position with the latch 42. It will be observed that the space provided between the reverse curved surface 49 and the face 50 of the latch section provides sufficient width for holding and retaining the catch portion in the locked position.

With reference to FIGURE 3, it will be observed that there are three sets of hold back tabs 52 spaced from the rearward edge of the bottom 12 and the two sides 13 and 14. As shown in detail in FIGURE 8 the hold back tabs are in the shape of a right angle triangle and rise substantially perpendicular to the upper face of the web or sheet 24. The vertical base 54 is towards the rear and the hypotenuse 56 slopes toward the front. The hold back tabs 52 are formed integrally in the plastic sheet 24 and their purpose and function will be explained later herein.

On the rear end wall 18 there are four similarly shaped tabs 57 which are arranged radially from the center 55.

The tabs 57 are spaced at approximately 90 intervals and are offset 45 from the longitudinal center line. The vertical base of each of the right triangular shaped tabs 57 is faced outwardly so that the hypotenuse of each slopes inwardly toward the center.

On the under surface of the sheet in the panel forming the top 16 are two pairs of stacking tabs 58. It will be observed that these are located on the under side of the sheet which becomes the top of the container 11. The tabs 58 are formed integral with the under surface and project therefrom a distance approximately equal to the thickness of the sheet 24. The tabs 58 are generally rectangular in shape and are arranged longitudinally along a transverse line adjacent the front and rear edges of the top 16. These tabs are designed to mate with longitudinal slots 59 of another dispenser-container. The slots 59 are in complementary pairs with a front pair located transversely adjacent the front edge of the bottom 12. The rear pair of slots 59 are formed the required longitudinal distance to mate with the stacking tabs 58 of another dispenser-container which brings them forward of the hold back tabs 52 on the bottom 12. It will be observed that having the stacking slots 59 offset longitudinally with respect to the stacking tabs 58, that the staggered stacked dispenser-containers shown in FIGURE 1 is achieved and locked vertically together.

In FIGURE 9, there is shown a separate and movable retaining wall 19 which is shown relatively positioned within the container in FIGURE 2. Wall 19 is also of plastic and is substantially rectangular in shape with dimensions slightly under the inner cross sectional dimensions of the assembled container 11 for free movement therein. Along its top edge is a cut-out portion 62 which, in its assembled position, provides a sufficient space to prevent interference with the thumb and fingers of a customer in grasping the contents within the container and preventing withdrawal thereof. Its forward, or under-surface as shown in FIGURE 9, is an uninterrupted flat surface. On its rearward or upper surface as shown, there are four central adjacent right triangular tabs 61 formed perpendicularly thereon. The tabs 61 are arranged very close to the center 63 and have the hypotenuse thereof directed inwardly toward the center 63. The tabs 61 are again arranged radially at intervals of 90 offset 45 from the vertical center line. Spaced from each of the tabs 63 and a radial continuation thereof, are lower perpendicular tabs 64 with the long bypotenuse of each extending radially outwardly to the surface. Occasionally it is convenient to cut the lower edge 65 transversely up to the broken line indicated by 65. This is to reduce the height of the movable wall 19 within the container.

In the assembly of the display container of the present invention, the sheet or web 24 forming the main blank of the container, is laid out in the position shown in FIGURE 3. The end wall 18 is folded against the hinge portion 23 upwardly so that it assumes a position substantially perpendicular to the face of the sheet. The adjacent side walls 13 and 14 are then folded upwardly one at a time so that the head 32 engages the latch portion 42 to lock the same into position. The locking is continuous along each edge. The front wall 17 is then folded upwardly until it too assumes a position substantially perpendicular to the bottom 12. The underbead 32 along the side edges are pressed into the latching means 42 along the front edges of the side walls 13 and 14. Here again, the latching is continuous along the entire edge. An open container substantially rectangular in shape is then produced. The cover 16 is then folded down to the horizontal position so that its latching means 42 continuously along the edge 44 engages the catch bead 32 along the exposed marginal edge of the side 14. It will be observed that the upstanding tab 66 formed integrally at right angles with and to the top 16, covers the outer edge of the back wall 18 and prevents it from being pushed outwardly. Thus, the back wall 18 is supported at the bottom by the integral hinge 23, at the side by the latching connections with the side walls 13 and 14 and at the top by the depending tab 66. The basic form of the container has the side walls 13 and 14 cut out, as at 15 at the forward upper corners so that the top 16 is considerably shorter in longitudinal length than the bottom 12. Also, the front 17 as indicated earlier, is cut away so that a considerable portion of its face is missing leaving only the marginal edges adjacent the side walls and the bottom remaining.

Before the top is closed in position, the movable wall 19 is placed within the container so that its smooth surface faces forwardly and abuts the vertical bases of the triangular tabs 52. A coil compression spring 21 which is shown to be of tapering form but may be any suitable means, is placed so that the large end of the helix is positioned by the vertical bases of the triangular tabs 57 on the inner face of end 18. The smaller end of the helix engages between the vertical faces of the tabs 61 and 64 on the movable wall 19 as shown in FIGURE 2. The movement of the wall is held against the action of the spring by the tabs 52 within the container. In this manner the container is loaded with separate packages of lunch meats or other foods 67 which are placed in vertical position forwardly of the smooth face of the movable wall 19 until the container is completely filled. It will be observed that the cut-out portion of the front wall 17 exposes the label on the first package 67 and that the cut-out portions 15 permit an opportunity to grasp each package 67 individually from the front end only. When the container is filled, the movable wall 19 is released from its holding action by the tabs 57 to bear directly against the vertically arranged food packages 67 and bears directly against the innermost package within the container. As each package 67 is removed from the forward end, the action of the spring 21 urges the movable wall forward the appropriate distance to keep the packages always erect, exposed properly and in continuous sequence. It is apparent that to the customer making a selection, there is no indication as to how many other packages are within the container, as only the first two and perhaps part of the third package in sequence from the front are exposed to any kind of public view. In this manner it is clear that only the first one or two packages which are exposed to view are availablefor selection by the customer before removal. from the container-dispenser. Accordingly, only a fresh package is available for selection and there is no chance for the customer to remove or replace the top one and insert it at a later place where it may become inadvertently displaced and out of sequence.

While the dispenser itself is of great importance, it has other unique features which have heretofore been unobtainable by any other container. The container of the present invention may be packed by the meat packer or distributor at its place of business and the packaged meats shipped in the container under appropriate refrigerated conditions so that the lunch meats and the like are in fresh condition at the time they are delivered to the market. The containers are stacked in the manner shown in FIGURE 1 Within the refrigerated storage area so that the containers do not cover up a lower series of different packaged foods when stacked vertically. When the customer selects a fresh pack from the container the movable wall 19 keeps the next fresh package moving in forward dispensing position due to the action of the wall 19 and the spring 21. Upon the dispensing of all of the packaged food in the container, the market merely separates the latch and hook connections of the container and restores it to the flat position shown in FTG- URE 3. This position will normally be assumed by the plastic as it tends to return to this position upon release of the catching means. Containers can then be stacked in the flat position and returned to the producer or distributor along with the separate springs 21 and walls 19. One of the characteristics of the plastic is that the sheets or webs 24 may :be washed and sterilized for reuse and reassembly in the manner described above. It is apparent that the coil spring 21 may also be made of the same plastic so that all portions may be washed and sterilized for reuse in the same manner. The plastic also has the characteristics that there is no wear at the hinge regardless of the number of fleXings and there is no appreciable wear on the latching means so that only slight clearances are involved and firm latching is always secured regardless of the number of reuses.

I claim:

1. A knock-down sterilizable shipping and display container for use and reuse in the merchandising of perishables comprising in combination, a single polypropylene blank about 16 mils thick comprising a bottom, side, front, back and top panels with the front end panel cut away at the top and central portions and said side panels cut back at their top front portions and the top panel extending forwardly only to the terminus of the cut back of the side panels, said panels being joined together integrally by the hinge means formed in said sheet and cooperating with disengageable locking means formed along the free edges of said panels, said front, sides and top locking together to form a container having an access opening in the top front, said hinge means being a formed valley in said plastic blank of very thin section below the surface of said blank having angular sides sloping downwardly thereto, said disengageable locking means comprising mating protuberances and sockets, a movable separate compressor plate disposed within said container substantially parallel to the plane of the front panel and means for urging said compressor plate forwardly toward the front panel.

2. The display container of claim 1 in which the valley of said hinge means has sides sloping at angles of about 45 from the horizontal and the web at the bottom of said valley of said hinge means is about mils thick.

3. The display container of claim 1 in which said means for urging said container wall is a plastic compression spring.

4. A sterilizable knock-down shipping and display container for use and reuse in merchandising of perishables, comprising in combination, a single polypropylene sheet blank of substantially uniform thickness comprising connected bottom, side, front end, back and top panels, depressed valleys of very thin section in the top surface of said sheet separating each panel, said depressed valleys having angular sides sloping downwardly thereto, socket channels formed continuously along the front and rear edges of said side panels and along the free side edge of said top panel, said socket channels being formed opening upwardly from the top surface of said sheet, continuous mating protuberances for disengagable locking in said socket channels formed continuously along the side edges of said front and rear end panels and along the free edge of one side panel and projecting downwardly from the under surface of said sheet, said front, sides and top panels locking together and defining a container having an access opening in the top front, a movable and separate compressor plate disposed within said container substantially parallel to the front and back wall thereof, and means for urging said compressor plate toward the front end panel.

5. A shipping and display container for use and reuse in merchandising of perishables, comprising in combination, a single polypropylene sheet blank of substantially uniform thickness shaped to form connected bottom, side, front end, back end and top panels, said front end panel being cut away to remove the top and central portions thereof, said side panels cut back at the top front portion thereof and the top panel extending only as far as the top edge of said side panels, depressed valleys of very thin section in the top surface of said sheet blank separating each panel, said depressed valleys having angular sides sloping downwardly thereto, socket channels formed continuously along the front and rear edges of said side panels and along the free longitudinal side of said top panel and opening upwardly from the top surface of said sheet blank, mating protuberances for disengagable locking in said socket channels formed continuously along the side edges of said front and rear end panels and along the free edge of one side panel and projecting downwardly from the under surface of said sheet, said front and rear end panels, side panels and top panel locking together and defining a container having an access opening at the top front, a movable and separate compressor plate disposed within said container substantially parallel to the front and back end panels thereof and means for urging said compressor plate toward the front end panel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,849,659 3/1932 Burks 22097 2,144,318 1/ 1939 Kryder 0.5 2,456,068 12/1948 Liben 22159 2,704,974 3/1955 Setman 211l26 2,964,210 12/ 1960 Paley.

3,028,207 4/ 1962 Darnell 3 12-3 11 .CLAUDE A. LE ROY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1849659 *Jul 17, 1930Mar 15, 1932Arthur W BurksSupport and spacer for stacking boxes
US2144318 *Apr 18, 1936Jan 17, 1939Ralph L KryderContainer
US2456068 *Oct 3, 1946Dec 14, 1948Jay LibenDispenser for stacked articles
US2704974 *Feb 13, 1952Mar 29, 1955Bucks County Entpr IncTrays
US2964210 *Nov 13, 1956Dec 13, 1960Albert A PaleyKnockdown container
US3028207 *May 24, 1960Apr 3, 1962Stuart M Lerner IncDrawer and frame
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3349289 *Jun 22, 1966Oct 24, 1967Int Rectifier CorpHousing for electrical apparatus modules
US3432061 *Jun 9, 1967Mar 11, 1969Shell Oil CoModular display bin
US4106668 *Feb 14, 1977Aug 15, 1978Kayser-Roth CorporationDevice for displaying and storing articles
US4369887 *Oct 11, 1979Jan 25, 1983Harbor Industries, Inc.Merchandizing rack
US5111939 *Dec 17, 1990May 12, 1992Schafer Christopher ESelf-supporting stacked display and dispenser structure
US5228590 *Aug 30, 1991Jul 20, 1993John BlaskoCarton for storing and dispensing substantially cylindrical articles
US5265760 *Jun 3, 1992Nov 30, 1993Eastman Kodak CompanyIndividual film packet dispenser and tray dispenser
US5295608 *Nov 30, 1992Mar 22, 1994Laporte Construction Chemicals North America, Inc.Carton for storing and dispensing substantially cylindrical articles
US5323920 *Jul 26, 1993Jun 28, 1994Eastman Kodak CompanyIndividual film packet dispenser and tray dispenser
US5325975 *Jun 14, 1991Jul 5, 1994United States Surgical CorporationSuture display cabinet
US6012582 *Apr 5, 1999Jan 11, 2000HijkStackable packaging and display system
US6749071 *Dec 10, 2001Jun 15, 2004American Greetings CorporationMerchandizing display
US6830157 *Nov 27, 2002Dec 14, 2004Display Industries, Llc.Pie pusher merchandising display device
US7350648 *Apr 29, 2004Apr 1, 2008Lloyd, Gerstner & PartnersModular display system
US7461647 *Jan 31, 2006Dec 9, 2008Slinkard Michael DArrow holder for loading and shooting multiple arrows in succession
US8646621Mar 16, 2011Feb 11, 2014Meadwestvaco CorporationProduct biasing and dispensing system with security engagement
DE4443775A1 *Dec 8, 1994Jun 13, 1996Eichler Projektierungs & PlanuPackaging unit for placing in shelf
DE10352206B4 *Nov 5, 2003Dec 16, 2010Thimm Verpackung Gmbh + Co. KgWarenverpackung
DE19506042A1 *Feb 21, 1995Aug 22, 1996Allan FruehaufBehälter zur Aufnahme von Obst oder Gemüse
WO2012125301A1 *Mar 2, 2012Sep 20, 2012Meadwestvaco CorporationProduct biasing and dispensing system with security engagement
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/71, 206/817, 221/303, 206/503, 221/276, 206/511, 206/509
International ClassificationA47F1/12, B65D6/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/817, A47F1/126
European ClassificationA47F1/12D1