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Publication numberUS3227074 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1966
Filing dateJun 18, 1963
Priority dateJun 18, 1963
Also published asDE1978088U
Publication numberUS 3227074 A, US 3227074A, US-A-3227074, US3227074 A, US3227074A
InventorsLareau Norman N
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary copy making device with temperature responsive heating means
US 3227074 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 4, 1966 N. N. LAREAU 3,227,074

ROTARY COPY MAKING DEVICE WITH TEMPERATURE RESPONSIVE HEATING MEANS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 18, 1963 /V. LAREAU INVENTOR NORMA/V AZQM ATTORNEYS Jan. 4, 1966 N N. LAREAU 3,227,074

ROTARY COPY MAKTNG DEVICE WITH TEMPERATURE RESPONSIVE HEATING MEANS Filed June 18, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 NORMAN 1v. LAREAU INVENIOR.

BY @;M%%% 24 1. M

ATTORNEYS United States Patent RGTARY COPY MAKING DEVHQE WITH TEM- PERATURE RESPGNSIVE HEATHNG MEAN Norman N. Larcau, Rochester, N.Y., assignor to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of New Jersey Filed June 18, 1963, Ser. No. 288,680 4 Claims. (Cl. 101-432) This invention relates generally to copying apparatus, and more specifically to a copy making device for making copies from an exposed matrix by placing a copy sheet in superimposed relation with the matrix to form a copy sheet-matrix sandwich and feeding the sandwich through the device where it is subjected to heat and pressure.

The use of pressure rollers in a copy making device between which a copy sheet-matrix sandwich is transported for transferring an image from the matrix onto the copy sheet is well known in the art. With certain matrix materials, in order to achieve an adequate image transfer onto a copy sheet, it is necessary to subject the matrix and copy sheet which are placed in intimate contact to a substantial pressure and at a temperature on the order of 160 F. In copy making devices of this type in which it is necessary to raise the temperature of the copy sheet and matrix in addition to subjecting it to pressure, dithculty has been encountered in maintaining the temperature of the rollers within a narrow predetermined range within which good copies can be made. This difficulty apparently results from the fact that the ambient room temperature of the matrix and copy sheet is substantially lower than the temperature of the rollers required to make a proper image transfer, With copy making devices of this type, the cooler matrix-copy sheet sandwich will reduce the temperature of the rollers to a point where inadequate copies will be produced. This is particularly so Where multiple copies are made. In certain prior art copying devices, an attempt to solve this difficulty has been made by employing heaters within the rollers, and thermostats mounted on the periphery of the rollers to control the heaters. Devices of this type are relatively complicated, and further do not reliably maintain the temperature of the rollers within the required predetermined range.

Applicants improved copy making device is believed to obviate these and other disadvantages of the prior art devices by providing a heated enclosure for the rollers having a novel compensating system for maintaining the temperature of the rollers within a narrow predetermined range. Applicants device further has a novel electrical system for automatically moving the rollers into pressure engagement when the machine is turned on, and automatically relieving the pressure between the rollers when the machine is turned off. This prevents the formation of a flat on the resilient rollers, which forms following a sustained period of inoperation and which interferes with the proper reproduction of copies.

Therefore, one of the objects of the present invention is to provide an improved copy making device in which a pair of opposed pressure rollers are mounted within a heated enclosure.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved copy making device having a simple, heat compensating system for maintaining the temperature of the pressure rollers within a narrow predetermined range at all times, particularly when making multiple copies.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved copy making device having means for automatically moving the pressure rollers into pressure engagement when the device is turned on, and moving the rollers out of pressure engagement when the machine is turned off.

3,227,074 Patented Jan. 4, 1966 Another object of the invention is to provide an improved copy making device of simple design and construction, thoroughly reliable and efiicient in operation, and economical to manufacture.

Objects and advantages other than those set forth above will be apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a copy making device constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, with portions thereof broken away and sectioned, and other parts eliminated for purposes of clarity;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the device looking at it from a dififerent angle with a portion thereof in an ex ploded view, other portions thereof broken away and sectioned, and other parts eliminated for purposes of clarity; and

FIG. 3 is a schematic electrical wiring diagram for the copy making device,

As shown in the drawings, the copy making device of this invention comprises a base 5, FIG. 1, having a compartmented frame 6 secured to its undersurface for holding sheets of matrix and sheets of copy material. A frame member '7 having side plates 8 is secured to the top of base 5, and each plate 8 has a V-shaped notch 9 for receiving a roller bearing 11 within which one end 10 of a metal roller 12 is journaled. Another bracket 13 is pivotally mounted on a shaft 14 carried by side plates 8, and also has side plates 15 with notches 16 therein for receiving roller bearings 1'7 in which the ends 17' of a resilient roller 13 are journaled. The bracket 13 and its roller 18 are pivotally moved toward and away from metal roller 12 by means of a pair of axially spaced eccentrics i9 (seen best in FIG. 2) mounted on a shaft 21 carried by side plates 8 of fixed bracket 7. The eccentrics 19 are in peripheral engagement with cam followers 22 mounted on a shaft 23 carried by side plates 15 of pivotal bracket 13. The pivotal bracket 13 is urged by a pair of helical springs 24 in a clockwise direction as seen in FIG. 2 for urging cam followers 22 into engagement with the periphery of the eccentric cams 19. Each spring 24 has one end encircling a grooved end of a rod 25 carried in a notch 26 in side plates 15, and its opposite end secured to a threaded bolt 27 (see FIG. 1) extending through a bar 28 carried by fixed bracket 7 and secured to the bar by a nut 29. With this arrangement, it is possible to vary the spring tension and hence the force exerted between the pressure rollers 12, 18.

A feed duct comprising upper and lower plates 31, 32 respectively is secured to fixed bracket 7 by any known means, not shown, for guiding a matrix and copy sheet sandwich into the nip of the pressure rollers 12, 18. An upper guide member 33 (seen best in FIG. 1) pivotally secured by pins 30 to side plates 8 of fixed bracket 7 is adapted in its operative position to receive the matrixcopy sheet sandwich from the rollers 12, 18 and direct it out of the device, The guide member 33 has a projection 3d at each end which is adapted to rest on the periphery of bearing 17 when it is in its operative position.

Also secured to base 5 are a plurality of upright plates 34, 35, 36, and 37 forming a partial enclosure of brackets 7, 13 and rollers 12, 18. An L-shaped cover member 38 partially shown in FIG. 2 is releasably secured to the plates 34, and 36 to complete the enclosure, which has one notch 39 therein through which plates 31, 32 extend, and a slot 41 in upper plate 38 through which guide member 33 extends. Slot 41 is in register with opening of a housing 4% within which the device is enclosed. A reflector, not shown, is secured to base 5 within the enclosure, and a resistive heating element 42 is secured to base 5 above the reflector for heating the enclosure. To

q. minimize the dissipation of heat from the enclosure, insulating material 4-3 in blanket form of any known type is secured to the periphery of the enclosure by clips, not shown.

The temperature of the atmosphere within the enclosure and of the rollers 12, 18 is controlled by a thermostat 44' connected to a thermostat probe 44 of known type mounted within the enclosure adjacent the lower plate 32 of the duct (see FIG. 2). The thermostat probe 44 in this position is responsive to the temperature of the lower plate 32, and the temperature of the lower plate is affected by the cooler matrix-copy sheet sari wich as it is introduced into the device. Consequently, as the matrix-copy sheet sandwich 30 is moved over lower plate 32 by the operator, the temperature or" the lower plate is reduced and actuates the thermostat probe 44 to call for more heat before the matrix-copy sheet sandwich 30 reaches pressure rollers 12, 18. Therefore, the normal tendency for the temperature of the pressure rollers to be reduced by the cooler matrix-copy sheet sandwich 30 is counteracted by the heat generated by heater 42 before the temperature of rollers 12, 18 begins to drop. The responsiveness of thermostat probe 30 to the temperature of lower plate 32 may be controlled by the insertion of a sheet of insulating material 45 between the probe 44 and lower plate 32. The insulating material 45 is releasably held to lower plate 32 by a Spring clip 46 secured to lower plate 32. By varying the type of insulating material S5, or its thickness, it is possible to vary the amount of pro-anticipation of the drop in roller temperature. By properly selecting the insulating material, it is possible to maintain the temperature range of the rollers 12,

while in use between plus or minus 10 F.

The drive mechanism for the copy making device comprises a motor 47 secured to a bracket, not shown, mounted on base for driving a shaft 48 through a speed reducer, not shown. Shaft 48 extends through an opening, not shown, in plate .36, and is drivingly connected by a coupling 49 to shaft of roller 12 for driving the roller at a predetermined rotational speed. Another motor 51, similar to motor 47, is also secured to the bracket, and drives a shaft 52 through a speed reducer, not shown. Shaft 52 extends through an opening in plate 36, and is drivingly connected by a coupling 53 similar to coupling 49 to one end of cam shaft 21 for driving same. Another cam 54 is secured to cam shaft 21 and has a projection 55 thereon for moving a micro-switch 56 between two positions in the power circuit. The device also has an operating switch S movable between off and on positions by means of buttons 57, 58 for connecting an electrical power source to the device.

In the operation of thi device, particularly with reference to FIG. 3, when the operating switch S is turned to the on position, the power is immediately connected to the roller drive motor 4-7 and the cam shaft drive motor 51 through micro-switch 56 which is in its normal position electrically connected to a contact 59. At this instant, the cam 19 and cam follower 22 relationship is such that rollers 12, 18 are out of pressure engagement. As soon as cam shaft 21 and cams 19, 54 have rotated through a predetermined portion of a revolution, projection 55 actuates micro-switch 56 moving it out of its normal position into engagement with contact 61, disconnecting the power to cam shaft drive motor 51. In this position, the pressure rollers 12, 18 are in pressure engagement. The copying device is then in position for use, and the operator may feed matrix and copy sheet sandwiches 3t} therethrough for producing copies. When the operator no longer desires to make further copies, the device is turned off by moving the operating switch S to its off position. This action disconnects the power supply from roller drive motor 47, and connects it to cam shaft drive motor 51 through micro-switch 56 which is still in connection with contact 61. Consequently, cam shaft drive motor 51 drives the cam shaft 21 and cams 19, 54 through the remainder of its revolution, during which roller 18 is moved out of pressure engagement with roller 12, and projections 55 releases micro-switch 56 which returns to its normal position in engagement with contact 59, breaking the electrical circuit to cam shaft drive motor 51.

The invention has been described in detail with particular reference to a preferred embodiment thereof, but it will be understood that variations and modifications can be effected within the spirit and scope of the invention as described hereinabove and as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a copy making device for making a copy from an exposed matrix by placing a copy sheet in superimposed relation with said matrix to form a copy sheetmatrix sandwich and feeding the sandwich through the device where it is subjected to heat and pressure, the combination comprising:

(a) an enclosure having an inlet duct and an outlet;

(b) means mounted within said enclosure for receiving a copy sheet-matrix sandwich which has been introduced through said inlet duct, and simultaneously subjecting said sandwich to pressure, and transporting said sandwich through said enclosure and out of said outlet;

(0) means for heating said enclosure to maintain said enclosure and said receiving, subjecting and transporting means within a predetermined temperature range, the lower value of which is higher than the normal ambient temperature of said copy sheet and matrix to be introduced into said duct; and

((1) temperature responsive means for turning said heating means on and oil and mounted within said enclosure adjacent said duct whereby a predetermined reduction in temperature of said duct by said cooler copy sheet and matrix actuates said temperature responsive means to turn on said heating means.

2. The invention according to claim 1 wherein said enclosure is insulated.

3. The invention according to claim 1 wherein said inlet duct has a lower surface, and a sheet of insulation is interposed between said lower surface and said temperature responsive means.

4. The invention according to claim 1 wherein said receiving, subjecting and transporting means comprises a pair of opposed, engageable rollers.

References Cited by the Examiner UNETED STATES PATENTS 1,546,126 7/1925 Grosskopf 101247 2,518,878 8/1950 Gerlach 10l-247 2,927,210 3/1960 OMara 25065.1 2,934,007 4/1960 Francis et a1 101-131 3,012,141 12/1961 Thomiszer 250--65.1 3,020,837 1/1962 Taylor et a1 101-1325 3,053,175 9/1962 Urbach 101131 3,099,208 7/1963 Hodges et a1 101-131 3,131,302 4/1964 Kimble 25065.1 3,150,262 9/1964 Ulseth et a1 25065.1

ROBERT E. PULFREY, Primary Examiner.

EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1546126 *Jul 30, 1924Jul 14, 1925Richard GrosskopfRotary printing press
US2518878 *Dec 29, 1945Aug 15, 1950Block & Anderson LtdPressure adjustment in rotary printing machines
US2927210 *May 21, 1958Mar 1, 1960Minnesota Mining & MfgCopying machine
US2934007 *May 27, 1958Apr 26, 1960Caribonum LtdDuplicating machines
US3012141 *Aug 18, 1960Dec 5, 1961Dietzgen Co EugeneHeating apparatus
US3020837 *May 28, 1959Feb 13, 1962Eastman Kodak CoPhotographic copying apparatus
US3053175 *Nov 21, 1958Sep 11, 1962Minnesota Mining & MfgThermocopying machine
US3099208 *May 3, 1960Jul 30, 1963Eastman Kodak CoPhotographic copier
US3131302 *Dec 3, 1959Apr 28, 1964Minnesota Mining & MfgThermoprinting by pre-heating original image
US3150262 *Apr 5, 1960Sep 22, 1964Minnesota Mining & MfgThermographic copying machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6315916May 8, 2000Nov 13, 2001Pisces-Print Image Sciences, Inc.Chemical imaging of a lithographic printing plate
US6458503Mar 8, 2001Oct 1, 2002Kodak Polychrome Graphics LlcFluorinated aromatic acetal polymers and photosensitive compositions containing such polymers
US6523471Aug 29, 2001Feb 25, 2003Pisces-Print Imaging Sciences, Inc.Chemical imaging of a lithographic printing plate
US6691618Oct 25, 2001Feb 17, 2004Pisces-Print Imaging Sciences, Inc.Chemical imaging of a lithographic printing plate
US6796235Aug 29, 2001Sep 28, 2004Maxryan Enterprises, Inc.Applying imagewise an insolubilizing chemical to the coating for imaging a printing plate having a coating comprising diazo compounds
EP0580530A2Jul 16, 1993Jan 26, 1994Eastman Kodak CompanyPhotosensitive compositions and lithographic printing plates with reduced propensity to blinding
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/132, 101/247
International ClassificationG03B27/02, G03B27/30
Cooperative ClassificationG03B27/306
European ClassificationG03B27/30H