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Publication numberUS3227272 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1966
Filing dateDec 17, 1963
Priority dateDec 17, 1963
Publication numberUS 3227272 A, US 3227272A, US-A-3227272, US3227272 A, US3227272A
InventorsEnglish Critzer Walter
Original AssigneeDu Pont
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Article stacking arrangement
US 3227272 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 4, 1966 w. E. CRITZER 3,227,272

ARTICLE STACKING ARRANGEMENT Filed Dec. 17, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 33 INVENTOR WALTER ENGLISH CRITZER Q BY ATTORNEY Jan. 4, 1966 w. E. CRITZER 3,227,272

ARTICLE STACKING ARRANGEMENT FIGJO INVENTOR WALTER ENGLISH CRITZER BY M 7 ATTORNEY Jan. 4, 1966 w. E. CRITZER 3,227,272

ARTICLE STACKING ARRANGEMENT Filed Dec. 1'7, 1963 3 SheetsSheet 5 FIG. ll

INVENTOR WALTER ENGLISH CRITZER ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,227,272 ARTICLE STACKING ARRANGEMENT Walter English Critzer, Waynesboro, Va., assignor to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Del.,

a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 17, 1963, Ser. No. 331,151 6 Claims. ((31. 206-65) This invention relates to shipping or storage assemblies and particularly to thoseassemblies wherein a plurality of like objects are arranged in layers.

For reasons of economy in storing and shipping, it is often desirable to collect a large number of like objects of relatively small size in a large carton, frequently in a layered arrangement. Typical of the objects commonly packed in this way are packages of textile yarn, such as bobbins, cones, cheeses, pirns and the like comprising core portions having a passageway extending therethrough and a winding of yarn thereon. It is also usually desirable that the objects be held firmly in place to pre vent damage from their contact with each other or with the sides or inserts of the shipping container.

It is an object of this invention to provide an assembly for storing and/or shipping a plurality of objects, each object having a passageway extending therethrough, and

wherein said objects are engaged so as to avoid relative movement thereof and damage thereto, such assembly being simple and inexpensive to construct and use. Other objects will be apparent from the description that follows.

According to the invention, there is provided an assembly which may include a carton for storing and/or the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a carton with a portion of the walls cut away to show the interior thereof;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of one element of a separator pad; I

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of another element of a separator pad; H

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of a separator pad combining the elements of FIGURES 2 and 3;

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view AA, of the separator pad of FIGURE 4; i

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of a continuous locking post;

FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a shipping carton showing the cooperation of the elements in accordance with one embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 8 shows an alternate form of a separator pad;

FIGURE 9 shows one element of the separator pad of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 shows another element of the separator pad of FIGURE 8; and

FIGURE 11 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a shipping carton showing the cooperation of theelernents in accordance with a further embodiment of this invention.

The invention will now be described as applied to packing cylindrical bobbins of textile yarns. Reference will be made to the drawings, wherein like elements are uniformly numbered. In FIGURE 1, carton 71 consists fundamentally of protective cover 73, which may be made of corrugated board, cardboard or other suitable material.

ice

The carton will, of course, be of suitable dimensions for packing the articles desired. The materials and details of construction of the outer carton shell are not a part of this invention. The invention may be employed with any of a number of carton constructions. By way of example, suitable cartons are illustrated in United States Patents 2,567,786 and 2,706,593, but the application of the invention is not restricted to the use of a carton or to any particular carton type or construction.

FIGURE 1 shows a plurality of yarn packages 72 in a layered or tiered arrangement commonly employed in the textile industry today. The yarn packages 72 are stacked in columns with the cores of each package vertically aligned. Packages within a column are spaced by separator pad structure 41, which is preferably a corrugated board assembly. Figure 1 further illustrates the manner in which continuous locking post 51 cooperates with separator pad structure 41 to hold yarn packages 72 firmly in place according to this invention.

Separator pad structure 41 is shown in FIGURES 4 and 5 and comprises elements 21 and 31. Element 21 shown in detail in FIGURES 2 and 7 constitutes one surface of the separator pad structure 41, and is formed from a sheet of corrugated board, cardboard or other suitable material. In element 21, holes 22 are spaced apertures having a diameter slightly greater than the outside diameter of the yarn bobbin cores 61 as shown in FIGURE 7. The spacing and arrangement of holes 22 will be governed by the dimensions of the yarn packages and by the number of packages it is desired to pack in a given layer in a carton since each hole or other engaging means is designed to receive one end of each yarn bobbin and position it in said layer.

Element 31 shown in detail in FIGURES 3 and 7 and presenting the other surface of the separator pad 41 may also be made from a sheet corrugated board, cardboard or other suitable material. The sheet is scored at a plurality of spaced areas by score-line 34. As illustrated, the scoring may be a circular pattern of smaller diameter than the holes 22 in element 21. Cruciform holes 32, bounded by score-line 34, are cut from the sheet to provide deflectable tabs 33 integral with the sheet and along the periphery of the hole. These tabes are hinged because of the scoring and are designed to admit and to frictionally grip the exterior of the locking post and to frictionally engage the interior of one end of the hollow core of the yarn package. Holes 32 are so spaced and arranged in element 31 that their centers will be in registry with the centers of holes 22 in element 21 when the two elements are glued or otherwise adhered together to form separator pad 41 as seen in FIGURES 4 and 5. The diameter of the generally circular pattern formed by score-line 34 and hole 32 is chosen to be the same as or only slightly less :than the inside diameter of bobbin core 61.

If desired, the separator pad may consist solely of element 31 as shown in FIGURES 3 and 11. In such an embodiment, there are no engaging means provided to receive one end of each yarn bobbin and to position it in a layer when the bobbins are initially placed in the layer. However, as the locking post is inserted into proper position, the tabs of the separator pad are deflected and frictionally engage the bobbin at one end thus permitting only minimum bobbin movement at the other end. This embodiment, i.e., the single layer separator pad, is far less preferred when dealing with yarn packages. To begin with, even slight bobbin movement may permit contact between adjacent yarn packages and cause damage to the external windings. There is also the possibility the yarn packages of the various layers may be out of line in any column. In this event, the locking post on insertion may contact yarn. rather than find its way into the bobbin cores.

Locking post 51 illustrated in FIGURE 6 may be a solid rod or mandrel of wood, metal or other material, but, for economy, light weight, and ease of handling, it is preferably a hollow cylinder of molded fibrous material such as pulpboard or cardboard. The length of locking post 51 will depend on the height of shipping case 71. Its diameter will depend on the inside diameter of the bobbin cores 61 to be packaged and on the thickness of element 31. As will be apparent from FIGURES 7 and 11, to achieve the positive locking that is the object of the invention, the diameter of locking post 51 should be equal to the inside diameter of bobbin core 61 reduced by twice the thickness of element 31, the tabs of which will exteriorly engage the locking post. One end of locking post 51 may be tapered as shown generally at 52 in FIGURE 6, and the other end may be flared if desired.

The manner in which the various elements of the preferred embodiment of the invention cooperate to provide positive locking of yarn bobbins 72 in shipping carton 71 will now be described with particular reference to FIGURES 1 and 7. In the bottom of the empty shipping case '71, may be placed one or more blank sheets of cardboard or other similar material cut to the same overall dimensions as separator pads 4-1. To these layers may be added a bottom pad equivalent to element 21 and likewise containing holes 22. Yarn packages 72 are then placed on the bottom pads so that the bobbin cores 61 are centered in holes 22. When the bottom layer of bobbins is complete, a separator pad 41 is placed over the layer of bobbins in such a way that element 31 is on the under side. Thus a new element 21 is provided on the upper side for seating the next layer of bobbins. This procedure is repeated until the carton is full, whereupon a top pad, which may be equivalent to element 31, is set in place over the top layer of bobbins.

A continuous locking post 51 is then inserted downward through each column of bobbins. As the locking post 51 passes downward, it bends locking tabs 33 on element 31 of separator pads 41 at the score-line 34, wedging tabs 33 securely in place between locking post 51 and the inside walls of bobbin cores 61. This wedging action coupled with the seating of bobbin cores 61 in holes 22 in element 21 of separator pad 41 firmly locks the yarn bobbins in place and prevents any damage that would otherwise result from the yarn packages rubbing against each other or against the walls of the shipping carton. When the locking posts 51 are all in place, additional blanks of the same over-all dimensions as before may be added for protection before the carton is closed and sealed.

FIGURE 11 is illustrative of an arrangement of the various components wherein the separator pad has no defined seating means for an end of each yarn bobbin. The components are identified as in FIGURE 7. In the operation of a shipping assembly that employs the arrangement of FIGURE 11, blank sheets are placed in the bottom of the shipping case as described above. Yarn packages are placed on the bottom pad. A separator pad consisting of element 31 is placed over the layer of bobbins and the procedure is repeated until the carton is full. Locking post 51 is then inserted downward through each column of bobbins, bending locking tabs 33 at the score-line 34. Tabs 33 are thus wedged securely in place between locking post 51 and the inside walls of bobbin cores 61. Additional blanks of the same over-all dimensions as before may then be added and the carton sealed.

The invention has been illustrated in connection with cylindrical yarn bobbins, that is, objects having a circular cross section and a parallel wall structure. It will be apparent that the principle of locking posts and locking tabs on separator pads can be employed with objects of other shapes. For example, FIGURES 8, 9, and 10 illustrate elements 21 and 31 and separator pad 41 for use with articles of square cross section. Square holes 82 are provided in element 21. Sore-line 94 in a square pattern are provided on element 31, which is also die-cut with diagonal lines 93 to form locking tabs 92, all centered in registry with the square holes 82 in element 21. The arrangement shown in FIGURES 8, 9, and 10 can be used with a locking post 51 of either circular or square cross section.

The objects to be packed need not have an actual defined tubular or equivalent core structure, and the opposite ends of the objects may be of ditferent dimensions and cross section. It is required only that they have openings oppositely placed with sufficient clearance to allow passage of the continuous locking post 51 and room to admit the locking tabs 33 as they are forced downward by the passage of locking post 51.

The over-all dimensions of the shipping case and the spacing, arrangement and specific dimensions of the locking post, separator pads, and other elements will all be dictated by the nature, shape and size of the objects to be packed and the number it is desired to pack in a single carton.

The invention is not intended to be limited to the specific embodiments thereof described herein. As many widely different embodiments and variations may be employed without departing from the spirit of the invention, it is to be limited only as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination, a plurality of tubular objects arranged in layers, each object having a passageway extending therethrough, said objects being further arranged in at least one column with the passageways aligned, a separator pad structure between layers, said pad structure having means for positioning one end of an object in one layer of a column, said pad structure also having holes therethrough and deflcctable hinged tabs along the periphery of the holes, and a locking post extending continuously through the passageways of the objects in said column and through holes in the separator pad structure, the tabs of said separator pad structure being deflected out of the plane of the structure in a position substantially perpendicular thereto, cooperating with the adjacent end of the object in the next layer and being in interior frictional engagement with the passageway of the object at such end, and in exterior frictional engagement with the locking post vicinal to that part of the passageway.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein the objects are yarn packages comprising a bobbin core and a winding of yarn on said core.

3. In combination a plurality of tubular objects arranged in layers, each object having a passageway extending therethrough, said objects being further arranged in at least one column with the passageways aligned, a separator pad structure between layers, said pad structure having holes therethrough which are smaller than the ends of the objects and deflcctable hinged tabs along the periphery of the holes, and a locking post extending continuously through the passageways of the objects in said column and through holes in the separator pad structure, the tabs of said separator pad structure being deflected out of the plane of the structure in a position substantially perpendicular thereto, cooperating with the adjacent end of the object in the next layer and being in interior frictional engagement with the passageway of the object at such end, and in exterior frictional engagement with the locking post vicinal to that part of the passageway.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein the objects are yarn packages comprising a bobbin core and a winding of yarn on said core.

5. An improved shipping or storage assembly comprising in combination, a container and a plurality of tiers of yarn packages therein, each package comprising a bobbin core having a passageway extending therethrough and a winding of yarn on said core, said packages being stacked in columns With the cores of the packages in each column being aligned, a corrugated board structure separating the tiers, said structure comprising first and second layers, said first layer having spaced apertures adapted to and engaging a first end of each core in the tier, said apertures being of slightly greater diameter than such bobbin core ends, and said second layer having a plurality of spaced areas, round holes in concentric alignment with the apertures of said first layer, the holes in said second layer being smaller than said bobbin core first ends, said second layer having integrally hinged tabs along the periphery of each hole and a locking post extending continuously from the top to the bottom of the interior of the container through the cores in a column, and through holes in the corrugated board structure, the tabs of said structure being deflected out of the plane of the structure in a position substantially perpendicular thereto and interiorly frictionally engaging the adjacent end of the core of the yarn package in the next tier and exteriorly engaging and gripping the locking post vicinal to that end of the core.

6. An improved shipping or storage assembly comprising in combination, a container and plurality of tiers of yarn packages, each package comprising a bobbin core having a passageway extending therethrough and a winding of yarn on said core, said packages being stacked 6 in columns with the cores of the packages in each column being aligned, a corrugated board structure separating the tiers, said structure comprising a layer having round holes that are smaller than the bobbin core ends located at a plurality of spaced areas and integrally hinged tabs along the periphery of each hole and a locking post extending continuously from the top to the bottom of the References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,362,282 12/ 1920 Beadle. 2,101,355 12/1937 Wonder 20652 2,424,553 7/ 1947 Conti 20652 2,699,866 1/ 1955 Russell 206 2,706,593 4/1955 Caraher 20659 3,051,307 8/1962 Hoey et a1 20665 THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1362282 *Nov 2, 1917Dec 14, 1920Columbia Graphophone Mfg CoShipping-receptacle
US2101355 *Sep 8, 1936Dec 7, 1937Cleef Bros VanTape carton
US2424553 *Jan 5, 1944Jul 29, 1947American Viscose CorpPackage of rolls of sheet material
US2699866 *May 13, 1950Jan 18, 1955Celanese CorpMultilayer yarn package
US2706593 *Feb 16, 1951Apr 19, 1955Du PontShipping cases for rayon
US3051307 *Nov 7, 1960Aug 28, 1962Kendall & CoAdhesive tape package
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4570794 *Jul 31, 1984Feb 18, 1986Borden, Inc.Suspension packaging for film rolls
US4967907 *Jun 12, 1989Nov 6, 1990Pozzi Leopoldo S.P.A.Supporting structure for quick loading of yarn spools in dyeing and drying machines or other processing devices
US4998619 *Jun 23, 1989Mar 12, 1991Signode CorporationClose-pack, vertical-stack webbing roll packaging
US5005706 *Nov 29, 1989Apr 9, 1991Reemay, Inc.Stable roll transport bundle
US5246113 *Oct 9, 1992Sep 21, 1993Riverwood International CorporationCarrier for stacked articles
US5344014 *Jul 27, 1992Sep 6, 1994Basf Magnetics GmbhReusable multipack for stacked wound rolls
US5924569 *Aug 12, 1997Jul 20, 1999Stone Container CorporationFilament tube shipping apparatus
US7124889 *Mar 9, 2004Oct 24, 2006Mexico Plastic CompanyRolled film and pallet construction
US7546921 *Mar 30, 2007Jun 16, 2009International Paper CompanyPackaging system for shipping a plurality of items
US9174789Mar 14, 2014Nov 3, 2015Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container with heating features
US20040182731 *Mar 9, 2004Sep 23, 2004Fuemmeler Carl D.Rolled film and pallet construction
US20080017650 *Mar 30, 2007Jan 24, 2008Evans John APackaging system for shipping a plurality of items
EP0525542A2 *Jul 17, 1992Feb 3, 1993BASF Magnetics GmbHReusable package for several reels
WO1994008868A1 *Sep 24, 1993Apr 28, 1994Riverwood International CorporationCarrier for stacked articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/392, 206/408, 206/394
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D71/70
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/70
European ClassificationB65D71/70