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Publication numberUS3227420 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 4, 1966
Filing dateSep 4, 1962
Priority dateSep 4, 1962
Publication numberUS 3227420 A, US 3227420A, US-A-3227420, US3227420 A, US3227420A
InventorsFrederick L Scott
Original AssigneeFrederick L Scott
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for moving loads
US 3227420 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 4, 1966 F. 1.. scorr APPARATUS FOR MOVING LOADS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 4, 1962 INVEN TOR.

FREDRICK L. SCOTT 1% A TTORNEY Jan. 4, 1966 T F. L. SCOTT 3,227,420

APPARATUS FOR MOVING LOADS Filed Sept. 4, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. FREDRICK L. SCOTT ATTORNEY Jan. 4, 1966 F. SCOTT 3,227,420

APPARATUS FOR MOVING LOADS Filed Sept. 4, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. FREDRICK L. SCOTT ATTORNEY Jan. 4, 1966 F. L. SCOTT 3,227,420

APPARATUS FOR MOVING LOADS Filed Sept. 4, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 a INVENTOR.

FREDRICK L. SCOTT ATTORNEY United States Patent f 3,227,420 APPARATUS FOR MOVING LOADS Frederick L. Scott, 602 Kimberton Drive, Fort Wayne, Ind. Filed Sept. 4, 1962, Ser. No. 220,989 7 Claims. (Cl. 254--175.7)

This invention relates to an apparatus for moving loads, and is useful as a hoist for raising or lowering work loads or for translating loads in somesuitable manner.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a novel hoist apparatus which utilizes as the force translating medium, a flexible tape such as nylon or the like and wherein the tape is maintained in wound condition within the apparatus in standby condition for usage as required.

A further object of the invention is to provide novel friction drive means in which a motor communicates tension force on the tape through a pair of adjustable rollers around and between which the tape is passed, said tape being driven by friction developed at the nip between the rollers.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel windup mechanism which receives the tape as it is drawn into the apparatus and maintains it suitably taut in relation to the driving rolls so that no backlash or tangling can occur as the tape is drawn into the apparatus.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a novel wiping lip arrangement whereby the tape is allowed to slide freely into and out of the apparatus but is subjected to a scraping action which removes unwanted foreign material from the surfaceof the tape. In this way, the tape is cleaned over the entire length which is drawn out of the apparatus before and following each use while the length is retracted into the apparatus.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel drive mechanism for the rotatable rolls which can translate the tape or impede payoutof the tape whereby a load can be controllably raised or lowered by said motor means. Also in conjunction with said drive mechanism there may be provided a novel locking construction which retains said rollers against movement of the tape and thereby afiixes its attached load in a given position.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following description which proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation view of the hoist apparatus with a part of the housing of the apparatus cut away to show the internal structure;

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged detail view showing the drive mechanism of the tape drive apparatus and its storage magazine in cross section;

FIGURE 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 44 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a detail view of the wiping lip for the tape, shown detached from the apparatus;

FIGURE 6 is a cross-sectional detail view of the wiping lip shown in FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged detail view of the bearings for the rotatable members constituting the friction drive for the tape; and,

Patented Jan. 4, 1966 FIGURE 8 is a detail view of the windup clock spring for maintaining the tape in a wound condition, the view being taken as the reverse side of FIGURE 3.

Referring now to the drawings, the hoist apparatus, indicated generally by reference numeral 10, is comprised of a casing 12 having sides 14 and 16 which are bolted or otherwise suitably secured to front 18 and back 20 covers and a base 22. The sides 14 and 16 include integral-bosses (FIG. 2) 24 which serve to journal operating portions of the hoist.

Within the casing 12 (FIG. 3) is a quantity of nylon tape 30 which, while variable in dimension, is comprised typically of about thickness, and one-inch width to provide a load test of about 8,000 lbs. While the total length of the tape also can vary, the apparatus includes typically about 30 feet in length. The nylon tape 30 may vary with respect to width or thickness in proportion to the friction drive rollers to allow various combinations of capacities and/or speeds. The tape is stored within the apparatus by being wound helically into coils 32 around a shaft 34 which is journaled on a magazine 36. The tape is passed over an idler roller 38 and is then wrapped in an opposite direction about a second roller 40 constituting the drive roller. The two rollers 38 and 40 are both supported on the magazine through associated shafts 42 and 44 respectively. The shafts 42, 44 are also journaled in the bosses 24 which are integral with sides 14 and 16 of the casing (FIG. 2).

The tape 30 can move in either of opposite directions within passage 46 of the magazine as it passes first over one roll 40 and then over the other roll 38 either being wound or unwound on the shaft 34.

Before entering the apparatus, the tape must first pass through a wiping lip 48 having an eyelet 50 (FIG. 6) which is proportioned relatively to the dimensions of the tape 30 to permit free, sliding movement of the tape 30 but also to develop a slight scraping action on the tape as it enters the casing in order to remove foreign material before the tape is Wound up; thus, any portion of the tape which leaves the apparatus is, before returning within the apparatus, subjected to a slight scraping action which will remove any contaminants likely to foul the internal working mechanism of the apparatus. The wiping lip 48 is mounted at the forward face 52 of the apparatus (FIG. 6) through mounting openings 54.

Driving force is exerted on the tape, frictionally, at the nip between the two opposed rollers 38 and 40, and this frictional force can be adjusted by moving the roller 38 either closer to or farther away from the roller 40 by means of a threaded stem 56 (FIG. 7) which can bias the bearing 58 of the support shaft 42 for the roller 38 within an elongated opening 61. By thus adjusting the shaft 42 either closer to or farther away from the shaft 44 of roller 40, it is possible to regulate the frictional or squeezing force between the two rollers 38 and 40. Roller 40 which is the driving roll can thereby deliver more tensile force through tape 30 by turning the stem 56 down and increasing the normal pressure on the tape at the nip of the rollers; or, decreasing the normal force on the tape by backing the stem 56 off will decrease the tensile bond developed by the tape. Adjustment of the stem 56 can take place through an opening 60.

The tape 30 is held tautly over the surface of idler roller 38 while tape is being drawn into the apparatus by means of a coil spring (FIGS. 4 and 8) 62 which biases shaft 34 in a direction which coils the tape, i.e., the roll of tape is biased clockwise in FIG. 3 by the coil windup spring. The tape is unwound and paid out of the apparatus by counterclockwise turning (FIG. 3) of the roll of tape and the shaft 34 thus causing the spring 62 to be wound up tighter as the tape is pulled out of the apparatus. Thus, the windup spring 62 is energized each time tape is drawn out of the apparatus and the coil spring energy is then used for effecting coiling action of the tape as tape is pulled back into the apparatus by the power roller 40. The magazine 36 is mounted within the casing 12 through shafts 42 and 44. Additional methods of power (not shown) for tape storage may be used such as mechanical friction drive assembly or hydraulic friction drive, both known as slip clutch assemblies.

The power roller 40 is caused to turn in one direction or the other, i.e., tape coiling or uncoiling directions, by means of a motor 64 having a gear train (FIG. 2) comprised of a pinion gear 66 meshing with gear 68 on shaft 70 which in turn has a pinion gear 72 meshing with gear 74 of shaft 76. A gear reduction takes place between spur gear 78 on the shaft 76 and gear wheel 80 on shaft 82, which in turn has a pinion gear 84 meshing with gear wheel 86 on the shaft 44. This gear train, has a suflicient gear reduction from the motor 64 to the power roll 40 so that substantial loads can be translated through the tape 30 with a relatively small capacity motor operative in a voltage range of 6 to 12 volts DC. or 115 volts A.C. current.

The gear train can be locked at any time by means of a brake 88 consisting of a knob 90 which is accessible to the operator, the knob 90 being at the end of a stem 92 which pushes a locking member 94 into or out of engagement with a gear wheel 96 (FIGURE 2) on the shaft 76 so as to lock the entire gear train from the motor 64 to the power roller 40. Since the power roller 40 cannot turn, the load secured to the tape 30 is then held to whatever position the tape 30 is at the time the brake is operated. To resume operation, the knob 90 of the brake 88 is retracted thus freeing the gear train so that the motor 64 will allow tape to move out of the apparatus or into the apparatus.

In operation, when it is desired to move a load, the tape 30 is drawn out of the apparatus until it is in position for securement with the load, the brake 88 being in released position and switch 100 moved to tape payout position by the operator who, at the time that the switch is operated, has full view of the loading operation. The motor 64 then sets in motion the gear train leading to power roller 40 which, bearing against roller 38 effects a squeezing action on the tape at the nip between the two rollers 38, 40, and frictionally draws the tape 30 into the apparatus where it passes over the roller 40 and then over roller 38. The incoming tape is wound up on shaft 34 by the coil spring 62 (FIGURES 4, 8). The coil spring 62 by continuously exerting tension on the tape causes coiling of the tape concurrently with windup operation, and, since the tape is under constant tension, it is held tautly against the outer periphery of the roller 38 thereby preventing backlash of the tape. The tape is drawn into the apparatus by a smooth continuous pulling action which gently translates the load. The friction force between the rollers and tape produces a very smooth pulling force completely free of jerking which characterizes winch action mechanisms. For this reason the apparatus is especially suitable for moving heavy but somewhat fragile loads such as boats or other loads where it is important to avoid shock by jerking or irregular movements.

While the tape is being wound up, it is drawn past the eyelet 50 which scrapes away any foreign material which might have contaminated the tape while it was out of the apparatus. Such contamination is, however, removed before the tape can re-enter the apparatus and move within the magazine 36. Once the tape is within the magazine, it is protected from dust, paint, water or other sorts of contamination. Therefore, the working parts of the apparatus and the tape are continuously protected both by the casing 12 and the magazine 36.

Should it be desired for any reason to hold the load at any position, this can be done easily by actuating the brake 88 (FIGURE 1) which will lock the gear train against further movement. The load is then held by the tape through the friction developed between rollers 38 and 40. The slight squeezing of the frictional action between the two rolls, 38, 40 produces no apparent abrasive effect on the tape, therefore, the tape is usable almost indefinitely without sign of wear. At the same time, the tape is flexible and has considerable tensile force making it easily handled and well suited for drawing substantial loads on the carriers of one type or another depending upon the specific application of the apparatus. An additional inherent quality of the nylon tape is that of a non-conductor and thus can be used for work where metal is prohibited.

It has also been found that the apparatus is useful for lowering loads as well as raising them, this being accomplished by first attaching the end of the tape 30 onto the load, dis-engaging the brake 88 and then moving the switch to a release position which operates the motor 64 in a direction oppositely that previously described whereby the gear train, acting through the motor will turn the power roller 40 in a direction paying out the tape 30 at a rate which is co-ordinated with the operation of the motor 64. The tape is, of course, prevented from moving at a faster rate because it is geared positively with the motor and is held frictionally by the two rollers 38 and 40. During this time, the tape is fed off windup shaft 34 against the resistance of coil spring 62 so that when lowering is completed the fully wound spring is energized to provide windup of the tape when the motor 64 is reversed and the tape 30 pulled back into the apparatus.

The various operations described, all take place within full view of the operator who needs only to actuate the brake 88 or switch 100 to control the motor 64 and cause it to operate in either forward or reverse directions causing the tape either to pay out or wind up.

The apparatus can be mounted through its base 22 either on the floor of a truck or the bed of a carrier of any suitable type and the specific application is not an essential part of the present invention.

Should servicing at any time be required, the sides 14 and 16 of the casing can be readily removed and access thereby had to the magazine 36 and other working parts of the apparatus.

Although the present invention has been illustrated and described in a single example embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that this is illustrative and is in no sense restrictive of the invention. It is intended that such revisions and variations of the invention as may be expected on the part of those skilled in the art, and which come within the scope of the present teaching, will be included within the definition of the following claims as equivalents of the invention.

I claim:

1. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape having opposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape is passed to provide a substantial peripheral wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over its outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape,

motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, and a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member.

2. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape havingopposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape is passed to provide a substantial peripheral wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over its outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape, motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said "apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member, and means for yieldably turning said take-up means to provide a consistantly exerted drawing effort whirh holds said tape tautly against one of said rotatable members.

3. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape having opposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape is passed to provide a substantial peripheral wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over its outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape, motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member, and means defining a guide slot through which said tape is drawn and proportioned to be of approximately the same dimension as the cross section of said tape.

4. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape having opposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape is passed to provide a substantial peripheral Wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over its outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape, motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member, and motor means including a gear train operatively connected to one of said opposing rotatable members to effect the rotation of said pair of rotatable members and thereby communicate force through said tape to its interconnected external load.

5. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape having opposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape is passed to provide a substantial peripheral wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over its outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape, motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member, motor means including a gear train operatively connected to one of said opposing rotatable members to effect the rotation of said pair of rotatable members and thereby communicate force through said tape to its interconnected external load, and selector switch means for controlling the direction of movement of said motor means including the gear train thereof and pair of opposing, rotatable members whereby tape is drawn in or fed out as selected.

6. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape having opposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape is passed to provide a substantial peripheral wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over its outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape, motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member, motor means including a gear train operatively connected to one of said opposing rotatable members to effect the rotation of said pair of rotatable members and thereby communicate force through said tape to its interconnected external load, selector switch means for controlling the direction of movement of said motor means including the gear train thereof and pair of opposing, rotatable members whereby tape is drawn in or fed out as selected, and a locking member for resisting turning of said gear train and thereby fixing the position of said tape which thereby retains the load connected thereto.

7. A hoist apparatus comprising in combination: an elongated, flexible friction-drivable tape having opposed surfaces which provide gripping thereon, a first rotatable member having an outer periphery over which said tape s passed to provide a substantial peripheral wrap effecting a driving action between said tape and first rotatable member, a second rotatable member opposing said first rotatable member and also having a substantial wrap over 1ts outer periphery by said tape and forming, together with said first rotatable member, a driving nip which grips said tape therebetween and produces a frictional driving force controlling the tensile force effort communicated through said tape, means for adjustably controlling the size of said nip to regulate the clamping effort on said tape and thereby determine the force communicable through said tape, motor means for driving one of said rotatable members, a take-up member for receiving the tape as it is drawn into said apparatus, thereby maintaining the wrap around said second rotatable member, and an encasement for said apparatus for enclosing said tape and said rotat- 7 8 able members to maintain the tape in a wound, contamina- 2,898,083 9/ 1959 Kresl 254-173 tion-free condition for standby use. 2,907,416 10/1959 Comba 254175 .5 2,947,516 8/1960 Jackson 254175.7 References Cited by the Examiner 3,005,621 10/ 1961 Johnson 254175.7

UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 FOREIGN PATENTS 2,363,353 11/1944 Parker 254197 1,121,039 4/1956 France. 2,695,957 11/1954 Cone 74230.24

2,744,788 5/1956 Grise 242107 SAMUEL F. COLEMAN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2363353 *Sep 9, 1942Nov 21, 1944Douglas Aircraft Co IncCable guard
US2695957 *Mar 31, 1948Nov 30, 1954Casco Products CorpProjectable antenna
US2744788 *Feb 24, 1954May 8, 1956Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoSwinging arm hose retriever for fluid dispensing apparatus
US2898083 *Oct 31, 1956Aug 4, 1959Kresl Elmer RHoist with chain takeup
US2907416 *Jun 11, 1952Oct 6, 1959Giovanni CombaDriving mechanism for extensible antennae
US2947516 *Oct 22, 1956Aug 2, 1960Young Iron WorksSlack puller
US3005621 *Jan 5, 1960Oct 24, 1961Johnson Richard LCable tensioning apparatus
FR1121039A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3309064 *Dec 18, 1964Mar 14, 1967Muller WolfWinch mechanism with dual drive
US3440896 *Jun 22, 1967Apr 29, 1969Milton Earl JonesPowered capstan cable pulling mechanism
US3648977 *Jul 14, 1969Mar 14, 1972Daniel RohrerPortable pulling device
US4557465 *Mar 19, 1984Dec 10, 1985The Boeing CompanyCable drive mechanism
US7168336 *Jun 4, 2004Jan 30, 2007Epo Science & Technology Inc.Transmission mechanism in slot-in drive
US7191678 *Oct 24, 2003Mar 20, 2007Rk Rose + Krieger Gmbh & Co. Kg Verbindungs-Und PositioniersystemeElectromotive adjustment device
Classifications
U.S. Classification254/284, 254/287, 74/414, 254/333, 254/310, 254/290
International ClassificationB66D1/12
Cooperative ClassificationB66D1/12, B66D2700/0141
European ClassificationB66D1/12