Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3228170 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1966
Filing dateNov 2, 1962
Priority dateNov 2, 1962
Publication numberUS 3228170 A, US 3228170A, US-A-3228170, US3228170 A, US3228170A
InventorsMarvin Eisenstadt
Original AssigneeSpector George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic variable size packaging machine
US 3228170 A
Images(10)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT 3,228,170

AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Nov. 2, 1962 10 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE l0 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 2, 1962 INVENTOR.

.ZWEW/V Z SE VSYZ DZ Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE l0 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed NOV. 2, 1962 m M f y g H W H M Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE l0 Sheets-Sheet 4.

Filed Nov. 2, 1962 INVENTOR. Nix? Vf/V i/jJ/VEZXDT Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE 10 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 2, 1962 INVENTOR.

Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT 3, 8, 70

AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Nov. 2, 1962 10 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR.

1%.? W4 Eff/Kiwi Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE 1O Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed Nov. 2, 1962 INVENTOR Jan. 11, 1966 Filed Nov. 2, 1962 couNrEiZ 6 Rip M. EISENSTADT 3,228,170

AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE l0 Sheets-Sheet 8 10f 1 7 2 WAY if jz VALVE SEALERH (SaDEs) CONTOUR KNIFE MAIN PISTON on. To BEARlNGS NORMALLV MAN FOLD

V OPEN SAFEW g 37 Z21 V' V I? UAGE FROM MAOJUAL 75 LBS. COMPRESSOR Z3 A\FZ ANK Q20 LBS) INVENTOR.

f fiVf V Elfin/57 p Jan. 11, 1966 M. EISENSTADT 3,228,170

AUTOMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE Filed NOV. 2, 1962 10 Sheets-Sheet 10 United States Patent 3,228,170 AUTQMATIC VARIABLE SIZE PACKAGING MACHINE Marvin Eisenstadt, Brooklyn, N.Y. George Specter, 3615 Woolworth Bldg, New York, N.Y.) Filed Nov. 2, 1962, Ser. No. 234,961 13 Claims. (Cl. 53-182) This invention generally relates to automatic machinery and more particularly to such machinery for making small packages of liquids, semi-liquids, liquids of high viscosity such as mustard, syrup, etc.

With the relatively new plastics available, thermosealed packaging is being more widely used. This is true with respect to food products where individual portions are now packaged in place of larger quantities. Some examples found in shops are primarily condiments. However, individual packaging normally costs more than does bulk packaging. Thus, savings must be realized in such individual packaging processes to prevent the ultimate costs of food or packaged products from outpricing themselves,

Because of the foregoing, an object of this invention is to provide an automatic reliable packaging machine, capable of economically packaging liquids, semi-liquids, or liquids of high viscosity in variable quantities.

Another object of this invention is to provide an automatic packaging machine having a high rate of output and which can be operated without interruption by making simple adjustments for changing the size of packages produced in dimension and quantity of matter within the package.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an automatic sequenced control for packaging machines, wherein each sequence of operation can be isolated from the other sequences whereby each sequence may be operated independently.

This invention contemplates an automatic packaging machine having sequence controls to make packaged fluid or semi-fluids wherein two parallel sheets of plastic are sealed along their edges, to form side seals, and the top and bottom closures of the package are formed by making transverse seals of periodic intervals. The transverse seals are then cut along a transverse centerline to form a top closure for a lower package and a bottom closure for an adjacent upper package.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages will be more fully understood by referring to the following description and the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic elevational view of a machine made in accordance with the invention showing the relative locations of the various major mechanical component assemblies,

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the type package made by the novel machine of FIGURE 1,

FIGURES 3A, 3B, and 3C are enlarged perspective views of portions of the machine arranged from top to bottom, which when combined, form the complete machine,

FIGURES 4 and 5 are plan views of the side and end sealing assemblies taken on lines 44 and 5-5, respectively, of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of an electric eye control, used to time the release of the sheets by the end seal assembly,

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged sectional view of the end horizontal sealing unit and cutter taken on line 77 of FIGURE 5,

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of the automatically 3,228,179 Patented Jan. 11, 1966 "ice cammed switches which control the sequential operation of the machine,

FIGURE 8A is a sectional view taken on line 8A8A of FIGURE 8,

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of the filler feed assembly of the novel machine and the package counter,

FIGURE 10 is a vertical section through the terminal end of the filler assembly and a package being filled,

FIGURE 11 is a plan view taken on line 55 of FIGURE 1 showing a part of the sealing assembly of FIGURE 5 and the cutter assembly,

FIGURE 12 is a diagrammatic view of the pressure fluid operating system of the novel machine,

FIGURE 13 is an elevational view of the control panel,

FIGURE 14 is a diagram of the electrical circuit,

FIGURES 15, 15A, 15B, 15C, 15D, and 15E are perspective views illustrating the action, in sequence, of the sealing and filling assemblies with the cutter of the novel machine during the manufacture of a package as shown in FIGURE 2.

Referring now to the drawings, a frame machine 20 made in accordance with the invention has spool supports 21 and guide rollers 22 for spools of parallel plastic webs 23 which will be edge sealed by a vertical edge sealing assembly 40, and a horizontal edge sealing assembly 60 to form packages 24 (see FIGURE 2) that are cut from the webs 23 by a blade 72 in the sealing assembly 60. The packages 24 are automatically filled with a fluid or semi-fluid substance 27 by a filler or feed assembly 100.

A control panel 130 with cammed switches, and electric circuit, and a pressure fluid system provide sequenced operation of the foregoing together with an elevator assembly and a package delivery assembly 90.

Referring now specifically to FIGURES 3A and 4, the two plastic webs are fed to the sealing assembly 40 that provides the vertical side seals 25. The assembly 40 has a yoke 41 comprised of a supported portion 42 with a hinge 44 which connects a hinged portion 43 that is kept in a close position by a spring biased detent or latch 45. Each of the yoke portions 42 and 43 support a jaw 46 in face to face opposing relationship with each other, and a pneumatic motor 51. The motors 51 cooperate to move jaws 46 into contact with and away from each other.

Each jaw 46 has a slidably mounted pressure plate 47 which carries a heating element 48 for heat sealing purposes. The webs 23 pass between the elements 48 each of which have opposing parallel pairs of spaced, vertical sealing surfaces 49 with a recess 50 therebetween. Each of the jaws 46 are connected to be driven by a piston rod 52 of a motor 51 mounted on yoke 40. Each motor 51 has a piston head 53 at the end of the rod 52 (see FIG- URE 4) which reciprocates in a cylinder 54 with two power connections 55 and 56. When pressure fluid is admitted to motors 51 through connections 55, the jaws 46 move toward the other. Pressure fluid admitted at the other connections 56 move the jaws 46 away from each other.

After the side seals 25 and end seal 26 are made, the

filler contents 27 to be packaged is injected by a tube or tubes 101 disposed between webs 23. Sealing assembly 60 then forms an end transverse closure which is cut along a transverse centerline to form end seals for adjacent packages.

To form a transverse closure, sealing assembly 60 is in an elevated position as shown in FIGURE 1, and the jaws 63 thereof move together to grip the webs 23 at a predetermined elevation and distance from the web ends forming a horizontal seal 26. A blade 72 slices the webs 23 through the center of the seal 26 to provide a separated sealed package 24 and a terminal web seal. (Refer to FIGURES 15, 15A, 15B, 15C, 15D, 15E, and 3B.)

The horizontal sealing and cutter-assembly 60 shown in FIGURES 3B, 5, 7, 11 and 15, has a yoke 61 with a central opening 62 in which are disposed the jaws 63, in face to face relationship. Each jaw 63 has a pressure plate 64 slidably connected to and carried by yoke 61. Each pressure plate 64 supports an upper heating element 65 and a lower heating element 66 with a space 67 between the elements 65 and 66. A guide plate 630: is connected to each element 65. Each jaw 63 is connected to a piston rod 69 of a pneumatic motor 68 for movement. Each motor 68 has a cylinder 70 with power connections 55 and 56 and which is mounted on yoke 61. A head 70 is connected to the end of rod 69 and is reciprocated in cylinder 71 by pressure fluid from lines 55 and 56 in directions opposite to the movement of heads 53 of motors 51 in the side sealing unit 40, opposing movement of heads '53 in the side sealing unit relative to heads 70 in the end sealing unit 60 results from connecting lines 55 and 56 to opposite sides of the respective heads (see FIGURE 12 particularly).

One of the jaws 63 has the space 67 between elements 65 and 66 to receive the edge of a blade 72 when extended. The other jaw 63 provides space 67 to normally hold blade 72 which is connected at its ends by links 73 to the pressure plate 64. An operator rod 74 is connected to links 73 and moved by an arm 75 driven by a motor 76 to extend and retract blade 72 through the plastic webs. Motor 76 is of the type illustrated by motors 51 and 68 and has two power connections or lines 77 and 78. After jaws 63 grip the webs 23 and have made a transverse horizontal seal 26 and the blade 72 is separating a package 24, the complete sealing and cutter assembly 60 is moving downwardly toward the package delivery assembly and is feeding a following portion of the webs to scaling assembly 40. This is accomplished by a carriage or elevator assembly 80.

As shown in FIGURES 3C and 1, the machine 20 has a stationary riser or vertical leg 28. A slide 81 of the elevator assembly 80 is disposed on riser 28 and has a pair of arms 82 which are connected to the ends of a pair of vertical rods 83 that are connected to yoke 61 at their upper ends. A rocker arm or bell crank 84 is connected to slide 81 and is operated by sequenced reciprocal operation of a pneumatic motor 85 having power connections or lines 87 and 88. A collar 86 may be positionable on the piston rod of motor 85 to adjustably limit the stroke thereof. An electric eye assembly 145 across Webs 23 is connected in the control system for the end seal and cutter assembly 60 to prevent overtravel (see FIGURE 6). The elevator assembly 80 lowers the sealing and cutter assembly 60 to its lowest point (FIGURE 15D) and then jaws 63 release the package 24 and the sealed end of webs 23. The electric eye 145 is blocked at specific instants by opaque squares 145a to cause release of webs 23 by jaws 63 just prior to the lowest position shown in FIGURE 15D. This results in formation of packages of accurately predetermined lengths.

Each package 24 is gripped between two spaced pairs of opposing arms 92 (see FIGURES 1 and 3B) with gripping tips 93 for holding the package momentarily, then dropping it on to a delivery chute 29. The gripping of each package by the tips 93 of the arms 92 takes place simultaneously with the withdrawal of the jaws 63 from each other to release the package 24, so that in this way, because each package is held by arms 92 as the jaws 63 are retracted from the package, the package cannot cling to the jaws 63 as they move apart from each other. Each pair of arms 92 are mounted on rotatable parallel shafts 91, connected to each other by meshing gears94. One of the shafts 91 has a pinion 95 in mesh with and rotated by a rack gear 96 that is reciprocated by a pneumatic motor 97 with power connections or lines 55 and 56 for sequenced oscillation or rocking of arms 91.

Referring to FIGURES 9 and 10, a filler or feed system 100 is provided to fill the packages. As may be also seen in FIGURE 9, a counter 30 is operated by a motor 31 connected to lines 77 and 78 each time the blade 72 is operated to count the number of packages 24 that have been produced. The filler assembly 100 has a motor 112, with two power connections 113 and 114, connected to the machine 20 at one end and to a slide 111 reciprocal in a frame 110. A feed pump 108 is connected at one end to 'slide 111 and at its other end to frame 110. Sequenced operation of motor 112 reciprocates pump 108 to transport the filler material 27 to a manifold 104 through a conduit 109. Filler pipes 101 are connected to manifold 104 and extend between the webs 23 as may be seen in FIGURE 1. Pipes 101 terminate in a guide 102 that spreads the webs 23. Guide 102 has spacers 103 contacting the vertical seals 25 of web 23. Dripping of filler 27 is prevented by sequenced operation of a drawback motor and pump 105 connected to manifold 104 and having power connections 106- and 107. The drawback nrotor creates a suction on manifold 104 and lines 101 after injection of filler material thus positively stopping dripping. The motor 112 includes a shaft 112a and an adjustable nut 112b, which controls the length of the stroke of the motor and the quantity of material injected.

A pressure fluid system is shown in FIGURE 12 for operating the various motors discussed. An air tank 32 is connected to a compressor (not shown) by an inlet line 33 and has a safety valve 34. Tank 32 has an outlet line 35 connected to a manifold A manual valve 36 is provided to control flow in line 35 and a gauge 37 for measuring the pressure of such flow. Manifold 120 has lines 121 connected to provide pressure fluid to valves 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, and 127. Valve 122 connects one of the lines 87 or 88- to line 121 and the other line to vent in accordance with controlled sequencing to operate the elevator motor 85. The valve 123 connects lines 55 or 56 to line 121 and the other to vent in accordance with controlled sequencing to operate motors. 51, 68, and motor 97. Valve 124 connects one of the lines 77 or 7 8 to line 121 and the other to vent to operate motors 76 and 31 for the cutter blade 72 and the counter 30, respectively, in accordance with controlled sequencing. Valves 125 and 126 connect one of the lines 113 or 114 and 106 or 107, respectively, to line 121 to control motors 105 and 112 in opposition to one another to operate the feed pump 108 in synchronization 'with drawback pump 105.

Valve 127 is normally opened during operation of machine 20 to connect line 121 to an oil reservoir 38. The pressurized reservoir 38 has a discharge line 39 to feed lubricant to various friction areas (not shown) of the machine 20. The details of the valves used to direct pressure fluid to the various motors, are not shown since they are conventional solenoid con-trolled type valves.

To provide synchronized sequenced control, the machine 20 has a control panel 130 as shown in FIG- URE 13 with electrical circuits as diagrammatically shown in FIGURE 14. Panel 130 has a pair of switches 134 and 135 to connect power to heater elements 48 of assembly 40 and elements 65 and 66 of assembly 60, respectively. R-heostat controls 134 and 135 are connected in the respective heater circuits to control the temperatures thereof with respective indicators 132 and 133 to check on the heater power flows. Auxiliary control switches 136a and 136b may be provided on yoke 61 if desired as shown in FIGURE 3B.

A master switch 131 is provided to :connect an outside source of electricity (not shown) to the control panel 130 and its six circuits for solenoid control valves 122 to 127. The six circuits have a common ground as indicated in the drawings and are initially connected to a positive terminal by the master switch 131.

The stroke or elevator circuit has a switch 140 which is manually closed, and a lamp 141 which then lights to indicate the circuit is energized. A normally open switch 142 (see FIGURES 14 and 8) is provided to be cam operated for sequenced control and when closed, energizes a solenoid 144 to shift valve 122 and reverse power to motor 85. A second lamp 143 is provided and lights to indicate solenoid 144 is energized.

The seals and gripper circuit has a switch 140a which is manually closed, and a lamp 141a which then lights to indicate the circuit is energized. A normally open switch 142a is provided to be cam operated for sequenced control and when closed energizes a solenoid 144a to shift valve 123 to reverse power to motors 51, 68 and 97. A second lamp 143a is provided and lights to indicate solenoid 144a is energized. The electric eye 145 operates a valve 123A which controls the end seal motors 68, causing jaws 63 to release the plastic just before the assembly 80 reaches its lowest position, thus preventing slippage due to overtravel.

Alternately the eye 145 could be in series with switches 140a and 142a in the seals and gripper circuit, whereby the control valve 123 would be operated to release the jaws 63 in advance of assembly 81) reaching its lowest point.

The cutter and counter circuit has a switch 14Gb which is manually closed, and a lamp 141b which then lights to indicate the circuit is energized. A normally open switch 14211 is provided to be cam operated for sequenced control and when closed energizes a solenoid 144]) to shift valve 124 to reverse power to motors 76 and 31. A second lamp 1431 is provided and lights to indicate solenoid 14% is energized.

The feed pump circuit has a switch 1460 which is manually closed, and a lamp 1410 which then lights to indicate the circuit is energized. A normally open switch 1420 is provided to be cam operated for sequenced control and when closed energizes a solenoid 1440 to shift valve 125 to reverse power to motor 112. A second lamp 1430 is provided and lights to indicate solenoid 1440 is energized.

The draw-back pump circuit has a switch 140d which is manually closed, and a lamp 141d which lights to indicate the circuit is energized. A normally closed switch 142d is provided for sequenced control and when opened deenergizes a solenoid 14401 to shift valve 126 to reverse power to motor 105. A second lamp 143d is provided to indicate solenoid 144d is energized. Switch 142d may be cam operated or, as shown, be connected to operate through a rocker link 148 in opposition to switch 1420.

The lubrication circuit merely has a manual switch 138 to energize solenoid 139 to open valve 127 to pressurize tank 38. The master switch 131, manual switches 138 and 140 to 140d, and lamps 141 to 141d and 143 to 143d are all mounted on panels 130.

As shown in FIGURES 8 and 8A, a motor 154) is connected to rotate a shaft 147 by a gear train 149. Shaft 147 has cams 146, 146a, 146b, and 1460, to sequentially operate switches 142, 142a 142b, 1420 and 142d, respectively, as they rotate. Each of the switches 142 14251 are similar to one another. As an example, switch 142 has a terminal block 151 pivoted to the machine at one end with an adjusting screw 156 to adjust its height from shaft 147. Block 151 has terminals 152 and 153, one of which is connected to the cam follower arm 154 pivotally connected to block 151. As cam 146 rotates, the high surface moves follower 154 upwardly to close the connection of terminals 152 and 153. A set screw 155 is provided to limit travel of follower 154.

The various cams and sequencing controls as hereinbefore described are arranged to provide operation as shown diagrammatically in FIGURES 15 to 15E wherein a completed package 24 has been delivered, yoke 60 has reached the bottom of its travel, and jaws 63 are spreading. Cam 147a closed switch 142a energizing solenoid 144a to shift valve 123 providing pressure fluid in line 55 to motor 76 which opened jaws 63, to motors 51 causing jaws 46 to close and form seals 25 along the edges of webs 23, and to motor 97 to close grippers 91 and grip the finished package 24.

Cam 146a then releases switch 142a to deenergize solenoid 14411 to reshift valve 123 and provide pressure fluid to line 56. Jaws 46 open, jaws 63 close and grippers 91 release the package 24. Cam 146 then closes switch 142 energizing solenoid 144 to shift valve 122 to provide pressure in line 87 to start the elevator downwardly.

Cam 146a then closes switch 1420 and opens 142d. Switch 1420 energizes solenoid 144C to shift valve 126 providing pressure fluid in line 113 so pump 112 draws more filler 27 to be delivered to manifold 114. After jaws 63 have formed an end seal 26, switch 142d energizes solenoid 144d to shaft valve 126 providing pressure fluid to line 107 to motor and deliver filler 27 via pipe 161 to the space between webs 23.

As the elevator descends, cam 146b closes switch 142b to energize solenoid 144b to shift valve 124 to provide pressure fluid in line 77 to move the blade and cut a package 24 free from webs 23 after the heater elements 65 and 66 have formed a seal 26. Pressure fluid from line 77 also operates motor 31 to put a count on counter 39. The cut by blade 72 is made after the seal is formed during descent of assembly 80.

Cam 146i) releases switch 142b and cam 1460 releases switch 1420 and closes 146d, then cam 146a releases switch 1420. Each of the above reverses the foregoing described operations. Cam 146 releases switch 142 as the yoke reaches the bottom of its stroke and the sequence repeats itself.

It is now apparent that each of the mechanical movements of the machine are effected by pneumatic pressure directed by solenoid operated valves. Furthermore, the valves are sequentially operated in a predetermined synchronized fashion by a series of cams mounted in parallel on a single shaft. Each of the circuits which deliver current to the solenoid valves, have manually operated switches, and consequently each circuit can be made nonoperative without affecting the operation of the other circuits. This makes it possible to halt some of the operating components, in order to make repairs while the other components are operating, or to make adjustments in the sequencing and synchronization, without stopping the machinev For example, if the knife was malfunctioning, it could be operated by itself, with the other components made non-operative by disconnecting the electric circuit. The knife could then be observed alone and its repairs made much more convenient and easier to recognibe. It is also possible to include manually controlled valves in each of the pneumatic lines which can be used to prevent pressure from reaching any specific operating component, thereby making it possible to isolate each of the movements individually.

A most important feature of this invention accrues from the provision of a pneumatic system electrically controlled, wherein each of the components can be manually adjusted during operation. For example, suppose, during a run, it was decided to increase the length of each package; this can be accomplished without stopping the machine, in the following manner: to increase the length, it obviously would be necessary to cause the elevator assembly 80 to move to a higher elevation than it had been moving. Inasmuch as the lowermost position of elevator 80 is a fixed point, movement of elevator 80 to a higher position, would obviously increase the amount of plastic material transported by the machine during downward movement of the elevator. To cause elevator 80 to move to a higher position than it had been moving, without stopping the machine, one merely adjusts the position of collar 86 (see FIGURE 3C). This of course,

7 i will increase the stroke of the piston rod in motor 85, and eventually the upward movement of elevator assembly 80.

To increase the quantity of material injected into the packages, it would be necessary to increase the period of time during which pump 108 is forcing material into manifold 104.

This is best accomplished by adjusting position of nut 11217 of motor 112 (FIGURE 9) to permit a longer stroke for piston 112a, thereby increasing the period of injection of material and hence the quantity of material. It may also be necessary to adjust cam 146b to provide pressure fluid to motor 112 during the increased period of the injection stroke. Smaller variations in periods of injection can be effected through calm 1966. It is also possible to vary the position when blade 72 cuts webs 23 by adjusting the respective cam shown in FIGURE 8. Similarly the desired sequential timing of each functional component can be adjusted while the machine is in operation, as described herein, providing a machine of great versatility.

It is now apparent that many other advantages result from the case of making adjustments, provided by the invention described hereinabove.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. An automatic packaging machine having two webs of heat and pressure scalable material, comprising a fixed yoke, a movable yoke, said webs passing through said yokes, each of said yokes having a pair of jaws with heating elements in face to face relationship each on one side of the webs, the elements of the jaws of the fixed yoke having irregular horizontally spaced surfaces for sealing the edges of said webs, motor means on the fixed yoke for moving the jaws thereof into contact with the webs for forming such seals, the jaw elements of the movable yoke being disposed in vertically spaced pairs on each jaw to provide a horizontal seal across the webs, motor means on the movable yoke for moving the elements into contact with the webs to form such seals, a blade disposed in the space between a pair of elements of one of the jaws carried by said movable yoke, motor means for extending the cutting edge of the blade through the webs and into the space between the elements of the other jaw carried by said movable yoke to sever a completed package from the webs and to leave a portion of the horizontal seal as a terminal web seal, a filler assembly having at least one delivery tube to dispense filler between the webs as a horizontal seal is formed, an elevator assembly connected to lower the movable yoke as the jaws thereof grip and seal to draw adjacent Web portions between the jaws of the fixed yoke and to advance the gripped package toward a delivery chute, said elevator assembly raising the movable yoke after the jaws thereof release the webs, to form a horizontal seal spaced from the end seal on the webs to form another package, a motor for moving the elevator assembly upwardly and downwardly, and sequenced power controls for operating said motors and being connected to open the jaws of one of said yokes when the jaws of the other of said yokes grip and seal said webs.

2. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 1 and having pair of grippers in face to face relation to receive a completed package from the jaws of the movable yoke, a pair of rotatable shafts, one of the pair of grippers being mounted on each of said shafts, a gear fixed to each shaft and in mesh with the other gear to cause both shafts to rotate and move the grippers toward each other when said shafts rotate in one pair of opposed directions simultaneously and away from each other when said shafts rotate in an opposite pair of opposed directions simultaneously, a pinion fixed to one of said shafts, a gripper motor, and a rack gear connected to said gripper motor and in mesh with said pinion.

3. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 1 wherein said controls comprise a manifold to receive pressure fluid, three valves connected to the manif, fold and each having a pair of discharge lines, each of said valves operable between two positions for providing pressure fluid to one of the discharge lines in each position, the discharge lines of one of said valves being connected to the blade operating motor, the discharge lines of another of said valves being connected to the elevator motor, and the discharge lines of the third of said valves being connected to the jaw motors to cause the jaws of the movable yoke to spread as the jaws of the fixed yoke grip.

4. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 3 and, a counter, a motor for operating the counter and being connected to the discharge lines of the valve connected to the blade motor for adding a count each time the blade severs a completed package.

5. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 1 wherein the filler assembly includes a guide block disposed between the webs and receiving the terminal end of the delivery tube, and a pair of spacers connected to the guide block engaging the sealed edges of the webs.

6. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 5 wherein the tiller assembly has a manifold to receive filler, a pump connected to the manifold to provide filler, a motor to operate said pump, a drawback pump connected to said manifold to force filler from the manifold to the delivery tube, and a motor connected to said drawback pump.

7. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 6 wherein the controls include a pair of valves connected to the pressure fluid manifold each having a pair of discharge lines connected to one of said motors of the filler assembly and operable between two positions for providing pressure to one of said discharge lines in each operating position.

8. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 7 wherein said controls have a circuit for operating each of said valves, comprising a master switch common to all of said circuits, a manual normally open switch that is closed before operating the machine, a cam operated switch connected in series with said manual switch, and a solenoid connected to the associated valve and in series with said switches which shifts the valve when energized when both switches are closed and reshifts said valve when at least one of said switches are open.

9. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 8 wherein each of said circuits include a lamp that is lit when the manual switch is closed and a second lamp that is lit when the solenoid is energized.

10. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim 9 and having a lubricant reservoir, a conduit connecting said pressure fluid manifold to said reservoir, a valve in the conduit to control flow of pressure fluid therethrough, and said reservoir having a delivery connection to provide lubricant to friction surfaces of said machine when the reservoir is pressurized by said pressure fluid.

11. An automatic packaging machine in accordance with claim It) and having a motor, a shaft driven by said motor, a plurality of cams angularly disposed relative to one another to provide the desired sequenced control, and each of said cams contacting at least one of said cam operated switches for opening and closing said switches in accordance with the desired sequence.

12. A device for forming seals on plastic sheets of material, comprising a pair of jaws mounted on a pair of hinged yokes, said yokes being hinged on one side, and movable on the opposite side, including means for locking the open side of the yokes, said jaws including means for reciprocating towards each other on the said yokes, in a direction at right angles to the said sheets of plastic material, said means including a pair of piston rods in axle alignment reciprocally mounted through the said yoke and attached at one end to fluid pressure operated motors, and at the other end, to the said jaws, including fluid pressure means for reciprocating the said motors in the said transverse direction towards and away from the plastic material.

13. In a packaging machine, sealing means for sealing packaging material and including at least one sealing member movable into engagement with the material for sealing the latter and out of engagement with the material for releasing the latter, and a package holding assembly for holding a package as the sealing member of said sealing means moves away from the material, said holding assembly including at least one package-holding member movable to and from a package holding position and means operatively connected to said package holding member for moving the latter to its package holding position while said sealing member moves away from the packaging material and for moving said package holding member away from the package, to release the latter, after said sealing member has moved away from the packaging material, and support means independent of said sealing means supporting said package-holding member and said means for moving the latter at a location where said package holding member will engage a package when said sealing member moves away from the material.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Bates 53182 XR Kenney et al 53373 XR Cozzoli 141116 XR Williamson et al.

Bracey 53182 Aubin 53l80 XR Tew 53182 XR Richardson 53379 Dreeben 53182 Reinhardt et al. 53180 XR Bonetti et a1 141-116 Great Britain.

FRANK E. BAILEY, Primary Examiner.

GRANVILLE Y. CUSTER, JR., Examiner.

S. ABEND, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1455383 *Oct 3, 1919May 15, 1923 of chicago
US2305010 *Dec 20, 1939Dec 15, 1942Walter E KenneyElectric cellophane bag sealer
US2605036 *May 4, 1949Jul 29, 1952Cozzoli Frank JFilling machine with constant drawback
US2610137 *Aug 16, 1948Sep 9, 1952Sears Roebuck & CoElectrothermal bag sealer
US2837883 *Sep 6, 1956Jun 10, 1958Package Machinery CoAutomatic packaging machine
US2917879 *Jul 31, 1957Dec 22, 1959SeabAutomatic machine for packing liquid or other products
US2953882 *May 8, 1959Sep 27, 1960Sperry Rand CorpPackaging machine
US3010267 *May 25, 1959Nov 28, 1961Chicago Carton CoCarton sealing apparatus
US3052074 *Oct 26, 1960Sep 4, 1962Jack DreebenPackage making apparatus
US3091902 *Apr 14, 1960Jun 4, 1963Fr Hesser Maschinenfabrik Ag FMethod and device for fabricating bag packages
US3097671 *Aug 5, 1960Jul 16, 1963Exxon Research Engineering CoFluid delivery device
GB521504A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3320721 *Apr 20, 1964May 23, 1967Clemson Ind IncPackaging apparatus
US3332198 *Apr 21, 1964Jul 25, 1967Holstein & Kappert MaschfProcess for the production and filling of bags or the like
US3465492 *Nov 28, 1966Sep 9, 1969Mayer & Co Inc OFolding device
US3777451 *Jul 31, 1972Dec 11, 1973Eastman Kodak CoApparatus for making and filling liquid containing pods
US3991540 *Sep 26, 1975Nov 16, 1976Situmo Holding S.A.Packaging machine
US4793121 *Jan 2, 1987Dec 27, 1988Jamison Mark DDispensing spout pre-forming system for pouch
US4817366 *Dec 17, 1986Apr 4, 1989International Paper CompanyHigh capacity package seal, sever, and brick apparatus and method
US4845926 *Nov 30, 1987Jul 11, 1989W. A. Lane, Inc.Pouch packaging machine with independent side and cross seals
US4881360 *Nov 23, 1988Nov 21, 1989International Paper CompanyHigh capacity package seal, sever, and brick apparatus and method
US5018646 *Nov 13, 1990May 28, 1991S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Squeezable fluid container
US5076040 *Mar 5, 1991Dec 31, 1991W.A. Lane, Inc.Seal bars having asymmetric surface features
US7013615 *Apr 13, 2004Mar 21, 2006Sealed Air Corporation (Us)Self-cleaning fluid dispenser
US7219483 *Sep 17, 2001May 22, 2007Printpack Illinois, Inc.Heat seal die and system and method for portion control sized packaging
WO1988005013A1 *Dec 17, 1987Jul 14, 1988Ampac CorpMethod and apparatus for pre-forming spout in seal flexible pouch
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/554
International ClassificationB65B59/00, B65B59/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65B59/02
European ClassificationB65B59/02