Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3228679 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1966
Filing dateAug 8, 1963
Priority dateAug 8, 1963
Publication numberUS 3228679 A, US 3228679A, US-A-3228679, US3228679 A, US3228679A
InventorsDees Leonard L
Original AssigneeKansas Sheet Metal Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for supporting conduits in trenches
US 3228679 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11, 1966 L. DEES 3,228,679

APPARATUS FOR SUPPORTING CONDUITS IN TRENGHES Filed Aug. 8, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 MW W' 'M Hi... "HH'" 2 l3 23 a m INVENTOR.

Leonard A. Dees A TTOR/VE Y DEES 3,228,679

APPARATUS FOR SUPPORTING CONDUITS IN TRENCHES Jan. 11, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 8, 1963 INVENTOR. Leonard 1. Fees.

A 7' TOR/V5 Y United States Patent 3,228,679 APPARATUS FOR SUPPORTING CONDUITS IN TRENCHES Leonard L. Dees, Kansas Sheet Metal Co., Inc., 314 E. 15th St., Topeka, Kans. Filed Aug. 8, 1963, Ser. No. 300,846 Claims. (Cl. 26971) This invention relates to an apparatus for supporting conduits and the like in trenches during pouring and setting of concrete in which the conduits are imbedded.

For example, conduits for supplying heating and cooling air to a building in a perimeter installation are usually run in trenches along walls of the building and are permanently held in place and protected by concrete which is filled in and around the conduits. It is obvious that such conduits, being hollow, are relatively lightweight, and, therefore, buoyant in the wet concrete during pouring and setting thereof, consequently, the buoyant force is such that the conduits are displayed from their desired position and often pushed out of the concrete. When this occurs the cost of placing the conduit and the materials are a complete loss, because the conduit cannot be returned to its original position without removal of the concrete and reinstallation. Also, such conduits are usually placed in accordance with exact specifications as to position and location with respect to the building. Any variation from the specifications, even though slight, might result in poor operation of the heating or cooling system. Thus it is most important that the conduit be accurately positioned and securely held in that place until the concrete has set.

It is, therefore, a principal object of the present invention to provide a small, lightweight conduit support having the form of a gantry in which the parts are readily adjustable to accommodate to the conditions encountered at the site of the trench. A further object is to provide a simple and adjustable hanger for supporting and retaining the conduit from movement during pouring and setting of the concrete.

Other objects of the invention are to provide a support of this character that is easily anchored at points spaced from sides of the trench for a firm footing and to avoid caveing in of the trench; and to provide lateral and Vertical adjustment so that the conduit is accurately located in its required position.

In accomplishing these and other objects of the invention as hereinafter described, I have provided improved structure, the preferred forms of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a vertical section through a wall and adjacent trench, having a conduit therein adjusted and supported with an apparatus embodying the features of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of the preferred form of apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical section through the apparatus on the line 33 of FIG. I, particularly illustrating the outer anchor for supporting the cross beam of the apparatus.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged section on the line 4-4 of FIG. 1, particularly illustrating the conduit hanger for suspending the conduit from the beam.

FIG. 5 is a section through the outer arm of the wall clamp, taken on the line 55 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a modified form of the invention to support a conduit in a trench where no wall has been provided.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged perspective view of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged section through one of the slides Patented Jan. 11, 1966 at one end of the transverse beam and which carries the supporting legs, the section being taken on the line 88 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 9 is a section through the lower end of one of the legs, showing the stake for anchoring the compression pad.

Referring more in detail to the drawings, and first to the form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 5, inclusive:

1 designates a section through one wall of a building, and 2 a trench alongside of the wall for containing a conduit 3 of a perimeter installation in a heating or cooling system. The conduit 3 is usually of light gauge metal and is protected and retained in the trench 2 by imbedding the conduit in concrete 4. Such conduits, being hollow and of light weight, are reaadily buoyant in the wet concrete 4, so that buoyant thrusts tend to shift the conduit out of its desired position, and in some instances the concrete completely floats the conduit to the top of the trench.

To avoid this difliculty, the present invention provides a simple and inexpensive supporting apparatus in the form of a small gantry 5, in that the apparatus includes a trans verse beam 6 to span the trench 2 and having ends supported as now to be described. The beam in the illustrated instance comprises a channel 7 having a web 8 and upper and lower flanges 9 and 10. The beam 6 is of a length so that one end may be supported on the wall 1 when the other end overlies the trench 2 a sufficient distance to carry an anchor 11 for firm support on the ground at the side of the trench opposite the wall.

The anchor for the wall end of the beam is a clamp 12, which includes a fixed arm 13, also in the form of a channel, and which has its web portion 14 fixed to the end of the beam, preferably by welding. The arm 13 depends downwardly from the beam, and the lower end thereof carries a clamp screw 15 having a threaded shank 16 mounted in an internally threaded opening 17 (FIG. 5) in a plate 18 that is attached to the flanges 19 of the arm, preferably by welding. In order that the internally threaded opening may have suflicient threads to securely mount the clamp screw, the inner side of the plate 18 has a nut 20 welded thereto in registry with the opening 17 and in alignment with an opening 21 in the web portion 14 of the arm. The outer end of the clamp screw has a T-shaped head 22 to facilitate turning thereof without the necessity of a wrench.

Cooperating with the arm 13 is an arm 23 for engaging the opposite sides of the wall and which includes angles 24 and 25 at the opposite sides of the beam and which are connected at their upper ends by a cross tie 26. The arm 23 is adjustably attached to the beam depending upon thickness of the wall by a bolt 27 extending through one of a series of openings 28 that are provided in the web 8 of the beam.

The anchor 11 comprises a slide in the form of a loop 29. The loop has a web portion 30 engaging the web 8 of the channel 7 and upper and lower flange portions 31 and 32 engaging the flange portions 9 and 10. The side of the loop opposite the web portion 30 is closed by a plate 33 welded .to the flange portions 31 and 32, as best shown in FIG. 3. The web portion 30 has fixed to the outer side thereof, preferably by welding, a vertical sleeve 34 that forms a guide for a stake 35.

The slide 29 is secured in any adjusted position along the length of the beam 6 by a clamping screw 36, similar to the clamping screw previously described. The sleeve 34 is clamped to the stake 35 by a clamp screw 37 threaded into the wall of the sleeve 34. Adjustable on the stake is a compression pad 38 that comprises a plate 39 having a sleeve 40 welded to the upper face thereof in registry with an opening 41 in the plate 39. The compression pad is fixed to the stake by a clamping screw 42, similar to the clamping screws 36 and 37.

In order to support the conduit from the gantry thus provided, the beam carries a hanger 43, which includes a slide 44 constructed of a section of channel of a size so that the web portion 45 thereof and flanges 46 and 47 (FIG. 4) fit over the web 8 and flanges 9 and 10 of the beam. The open side is closed by a plate 48 having,

a depending gusset portion 49. Fixed to the outer side of the plate 48 and extending to the bottom of the gusset 49 is a vertical guide sleeve 50 for guiding a stem or rod 51. Fixed to the lower end of the stem 51 is a saddle 52 in the form of an arcuate strap that extends over the upper face of the conduit and has laterally extending apertured ears 53 for fastening a girth 54, which may consist of a wire extending under the conduit and having its ends passing through the apertures of the ears 53 and twisted on themselves as shown at 55, to draw the saddle tightly'on the conduit. The hanger 43 is secured in fixed position on the beam 6 by a clamp screw 56 threaded into the flange 46 of the slide 44 and which has its shank bearing upon the flange 9 of the beam. The stem 51 is secured in the guide sleeve 50 by a similar clamping screw 57 (see FIG. 4).

The modified form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 6 to 9, inclusive, has a beam 6 and hanger 43 constructed as previously described. To make up the modified form of the invention, the arm 23 and anchor 11 are removed from the beam, followed by the removal of the hanger 43. The beam is inverted so that the arm 13 is uppermost, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. When the hanger is reapplied to the beam, the stem 51 thereof extends downwardly as before.

The ends of the beam are supported on leg assemblies 58 and 59. The leg assemblies 58 and 59 include slides 60 and 61 composed of channel sections 62 having web portions 63 and flanges 64 and 65 fitting over the beam 6. The open sides of the channels are closed by plates 66, that are welded to the flanges 64 and 65, to complete the slide. Welded to the plates 66 and to the webs 63 of the slides are downwardly diverging legs 67 and 68.

Fixed to the lower ends of the legs 67 and 68 are compression pads 69 and 70 adapted to seat on the ground for supporting the beam 6 in transverse relation to the trench 71 in which the conduit 72 is to be supported. The compression pads are anchored to the ground by means of stakes 73 and 74 which are supported in slanting position relatively to the plane of the legs and to the vertical by sleeves 75 and 76 welded to the plates in registry with openings 77 therein. The sleeves 75 and 76 thus guide the stakes so that they may be driven into the ground at the best angle to securely anchor the legs in both the longitudinal and lateral directions of the beam (see FIGS. 6 and 9).

The leg assemblies are secured to the beam by clamp screws 78 that are carried by the upper flanges 64 and have their ends bearing against the upper flange 9 of the beam. The stakes are secured in the sleeves 75 and 76 by similar clamping screws 79 threadedly carried by the sleeves 75 and 76 and having their ends arranged to bear against the stakes 73 and 74.

In using the form of invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 5, inclusive, it is assumed that the wall 1 has been built and that the trench 2 has been provided therealong. One or more of the units may be used, depending upon the length of the conduit, to support the conduit in the trench and to resist the buoyancy effect of the concrete used to imbed the conduit.

The ends of the beams 6 having the arms 13 are hooked over the top of the wall at properly spaced intervals (not shown) and the arms 23 are attached to the beams to engage'the, inside of. the. wall, as shown in FIG. 1.. The

4 clamp screws 15 are then adjusted to clamp the beams to the wall.

The members 29 of the anchor assemblies are adjusted on the beams 6 so that the compression pads 38 will have firm footing at the side of the trench opposite the wall 1. The compression pads 38-are placed on the ground below the sleeves 34. The stakes 35 are then dropped through the sleeves 34 and through the sleeves 40 of the compression pads 38. The stakes 35 are then driven into the ground as shown in FIG. 1. The clamp screws 36, 37 and 42 are then tightened to support the outer ends of the beams.

With the conduit 3 in the trench, the hangers 43 are shifted on the beams to align the saddles 52 with the conduit. The wires 54 are drawn under the conduit and the ends are attached to the ears 53 in a manner to firmly seat the saddles 52 on the conduit. The conduit is aligned in the trench by adjusting the hangers on the beams, after which the clamp screws 56 are tightened. When it is assured that the conduit has the slope desired, the clamp screws 57 are tightened against the shanks 51 which hold the conduit in suspension in the trench. The conduit is now firmly supported and held in its adjusted position in the trench. The concrete 4 is poured into the trench to fill in the space around the conduit, without danger of displacement by the buoyant effect of the wet concrete.

After the concrete has set, the portions of the stems 51 that project above the concrete may be cut off. The units may then be removed upon loosening the clamp screws 15, 37 and 42 and pulling the stakes 35.

The form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 6 to 9, inclusive, is used where there is no wall, in which case the beam 6 is supported transversely of the trench on the leg assemblies 58 and 59. The stakes 73 and 74 are then inserted in the guide sleeves 67 and 68, which hold the stakes at an angle both longitudinally and transversely of the beam when driven into the ground. It is thus apparent that the stakes, driven at the angles shown, anchor the compression pads to the ground. The hanger 43 is connected to the conduit as described above.

While I have described the invention in connection with air supply conduits of a perimeter air conditioning system, it is to be understood that the invention is adapted for positioning and holding any kind of conduits, pipes and the like for any purpose and where the conduits are to be imbedded in concrete or similar material.

What Iclaim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

'1. A support for positioning a hollow conduit in a trench and holding the conduit immovable from said position under buoying effect of the concrete when imbedding the conduit in concrete, said' support including a cross beam for spanning width of the trench with ends thereof extending over the sides of the trench to support weight of the portion of the conduit to be carried thereon,

means for supporting ends of the cross beam at a fixed level above the trench, transversely of the conduit,

means for anchoring the cross beam against upward thrust of the conduit under the buoying effect of the concrete,

a hanger including a slide having top, bottom and side portions slidably' engaging corresponding portions of the cross beam' to bring the hanger over the conduit,

a guide fixed to the slide,

a saddle for seating upon the conduit, I

a rigid stem carrying the saddle and slidable within the guide to bring the saddle into contact with the conduit,

a girth for extension under the conduit and having ends fixed to the saddle at' the respective sides of the conduit to rigidly secure the saddle to the conduit,

clamp means for securing said stem to the guide for supporting the conduit at the desireddepth in the trench and for holding the conduit from displacement under the buoyant effect of the concrete, and

clamp means carried by the slide and engageable with the cross beam for anchoring the slide on the cross beam.

2. A support for positioning a hollow conduit in a trench and holding the conduit immovable from said position under buoyant effect of the concrete when imbedding the conduit in concrete, as described in claim 1,

wherein the supporting means includes at least one leg assembly on one end of the cross beam, compression pads on the legs of the assembly for engaging the ground,

stake guides fixed to the compression pads at an angle thereto, and

stakes in said guides to be driven into the ground in accordance with the angles of the guides.

3. A support for positioning and holding a conduit from displacement in a trench extending along a wall while pouring concrete into the trench for imbedding the conduit, said support including a cross beam,

clamp means on one end of the cross beam to clamp said end of the cross beam to the wall,

means slidable on the other end of the beam and having a stake guide,

a stake carried in the guide to be driven into the ground at the opposite side of the trench,

a compression pad on the stake for engaging the ground,

clamping means for securing the stake in the guide,

clamping means for securing the compression pad to the stake for cooperating with the wall to support said cross beam, and

a hanger for the conduit supported by the cross beam for supporting and holding the conduit from said cross beam.

4. A support for holding a conduit from displacement in a trench extending along a wall while pouring concrete into the trench for imbedding the conduit, said support including a cross beam,

clamp means on one end of the cross beam to clamp said end of the cross beam to the wall,

means slidable on the other end of the beam and having a stake guide,

a stake carried in the guide to be driven into the ground at the opposite side of the trench,

a compression pad on the stake for engaging the ground,

clamping means for securing the stake in the guide,

clamping means for securing the compression pad to the stake for cooperating with the wall to support said cross beam,

in a trench extending along a wall while pouring concrete into the trench for imbedding the conduit, said support including a cross beam,

clamp means on one end of the cross beam to clamp said end of the cross beam to the wall,

means slidable on the other end of the beam and having a stake guide,

a stake carried in the guide to be driven into the ground at the opposite side of the trench,

a compression pad on the stake for engaging the ground,

clamping means for securing the stake in the guide,

clamping means for securing the compression pad to the stake for cooperating with the wall to support said cross beam,

a hanger movable along the cross beam to bring the hanger over the conduit in said trench,

a guide fixed to the hanger,

a saddle,

a stem carrying the saddle and slidable within the guide to bring the saddle into contact with the conduit,

a girth for extension under the conduit and attachment to the saddle, and

means for securing said stem to the guide for holding the conduit against the buoyant effect of the concrete.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 476,815 6/1892 Peterson 24859 726,636 4/1903 Carll 24858 1,520,840 12/1924 Murray 264- 1,855,751 4/ 1932 Buchanan 248-205 3,021,103 2/1962 Beyerle 248-57 ROBERT C. RIORDON, Primary Examiner.

LESTER M. SWINGLE, Examiner.

R. I. BUENZLE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US476815 *Feb 2, 1891Jun 14, 1892 Adjustable stovepipe-support
US726636 *Aug 5, 1902Apr 28, 1903Addison B CarllHanger for pipes, conduits, or the like.
US1520840 *Feb 4, 1924Dec 30, 1924Thomas E MurrayApparatus and method for molding conduits and the like
US1855751 *Jul 24, 1926Apr 26, 1932Thomas & Betts CorpAdjustable supporting means
US3021103 *Jul 27, 1959Feb 13, 1962Peter J BeyerlePlumbing assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3376010 *May 11, 1965Apr 2, 1968BoltonForming apparatus
US3837060 *Oct 31, 1972Sep 24, 1974N StehlingArmor joint jack
US4066237 *Sep 16, 1976Jan 3, 1978Jack BentzAdjustable form stake assembly
US4844655 *Mar 2, 1987Jul 4, 1989Aleshire Leonard CSurface drainage conduit installation structure and method
US5052654 *Apr 6, 1990Oct 1, 1991Means Michael JMolded plastic void hold down device for concrete beam-slab formation
US6908256Jun 23, 2004Jun 21, 2005Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Drainage grate assembly
US7125506Jun 21, 2004Oct 24, 2006Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Drainage channel installation device
US7252457Sep 27, 2004Aug 7, 2007Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Channel installation device
US7506844Aug 31, 2006Mar 24, 2009Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Drainage channel installation device
US7534071Jun 15, 2007May 19, 2009Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Channel installation device
US8132774 *Apr 17, 2007Mar 13, 2012Douglas WhatcottConcrete forming screed aids
US20040200939 *Apr 14, 2003Oct 14, 2004Morse Matthew R.Concrete foundation form system
US20050281619 *Jun 21, 2004Dec 22, 2005Derek HumphriesDrainage channel installation device
US20060013649 *Sep 27, 2004Jan 19, 2006Derek HumphriesChannel installation device
US20070069104 *Sep 23, 2005Mar 29, 2007Kenneth MorinConcrete forming structure frame locking device
US20070237619 *Jun 15, 2007Oct 11, 2007Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Channel installation device
US20080006003 *Feb 12, 2004Jan 10, 2008Milovan SkendzicMethod of Constructing Strip Foundations with Longitudinal Socket
US20080025798 *Aug 31, 2006Jan 31, 2008Aco Polymer Products, Inc.Drainage channel installation device
US20090272873 *Nov 5, 2009George FittlerAdjustable concrete form support bracket
US20100024347 *Jul 5, 2007Feb 4, 2010Alan WhitbyClamp
DE2624864A1 *Jun 3, 1976Dec 15, 1977Vndk Ges Fuer Entwicklung VerwEmbedding material for protecting ground drain pipe - is economical fly ash cement and water mixt. with fluidising agents
EP2039970A1 *Sep 24, 2008Mar 25, 2009André Louis Roger CordelierDevice for connecting and/or supporting smooth or corrugated duct with height adjustment for drainage, spreading, evacuation where tilt control is required
WO2006010759A1 *Jul 26, 2005Feb 2, 2006Prokodis SncMethod for mounting and installing a gate and ready-to-be-installed gate
Classifications
U.S. Classification269/71, 249/3, 264/35
International ClassificationF16L1/06, F16L1/10
Cooperative ClassificationF16L1/10
European ClassificationF16L1/10