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Publication numberUS3228695 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1966
Filing dateFeb 8, 1963
Priority dateFeb 8, 1963
Publication numberUS 3228695 A, US 3228695A, US-A-3228695, US3228695 A, US3228695A
InventorsRyan John W
Original AssigneeMattel Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Musical mechanism and game apparatus
US 3228695 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11, 1966 J. w. RYAN MUSICAL MECHANISM AND GAME APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 8, 1963 INVENTOR.

Jay/V W EVA/V ATTO/e/VEY Jan. 11, 1966 J. w. RYAN MUSICAL MECHANISM AND GAME APPARATUS Filed Feb. 8, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. JOHN W flFA/V BYWWW 4770/F/VEV Jan. 11, 1966 w. RYAN 3,228,695

MUSICAL MECHANISM AND GAME APPARATUS Filed Feb. 8, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 I NVENTOR. Jay/v W PVA/V Jan. 11, 1966 J. w. RYAN 3,228,695

MUSICAL MECHANISM AND GAME APPARATUS Filed Feb. 8, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 we C) {/06 [/07 r Q M Q N /d;

B r 0 w Lb :1

K J F 104 INVENTOR.

ATTO/FA/f) United States Patent 3,223,695 MUSICAL MECHANIsM AND GAME APPARATUS John W. Ryan, Bel Air, (Jalifi, assignor to Mattel, Inc, Hawthorne, Calif., a corporation of (Ialifornia Filed Feb. 8, 1963, Ser. No. 257,212 6 Claims. (Cl. 273143) In general, the present invention relates to a musical mechanism, and a game apparatus utilizing such mecha nism. More particularly, the present invention also relates to a mechanism adapted to play music and operate movable means by said playing, with said movable means adapted to be used in a game apparatus.

Musical toys are known wherein the music means therein initiates the action of some movable means to produce a predetermined result. For example, see U.S. Patent No. 2,705,387 entitled Animatable Musical Toy issued to Elliot Handler et al. on April 5, i955. However, such prior are devices as noted above require manual energizing of the movable means immediately prior to the initiation of its operation by the music means. Furthermore, because such manual operation was required, such devices could not play continuously. Also, such preo'e termined results heretofore have not been combined with a game to affect the playing of the game. For example, the movable means have not been used to form a roulette wheel.

There are many varieties of games known to the prior art which involve an element of chance as determined by a device, such as dice or a roulette wheel. Such chance element adds to the interest of the game, particularly there a child is playing against an adult. since it makes luck a strong factor in the game and tends to offset any superior skill the adult might have due to his age or wisdom. However, where two chance elements are used in sequence to determine the outcome of the game, such arrangement multiplies the chance element of the game and greatly stimulates interest therein. Furthermore, when the suspense of bingo is used to prolong the excitement or" the game the playing of such affords a great deal of entertainment and enjoyment to adults and children alike.

One object of the present invention is a simple, compact mechanism adapted to play music and operate a movable means by said playing.

Another object of the present invention is a mechanism adapted to play music and operate movable means, such as a roulette wheel, by said playing and designed for use in a game apparatus.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent from the following description and drawings which illustrate a preferred exemplary embodiment of the present invent-ion.

In general, the mechanism of the present invention is adapted to play music and operate movable means, such as a roulette wheel, by said playing. Such mechanism includes music means for playing a predetermined tune and movable means for producing a predetermined result. Transfer means actuated by the playing of said musical means energizes and initiates the operation of said movable means.

In general, the game apparatus of the present invention comprises a board having a track formed by a series of first spaces marked around its periphery, some of said first spaces being labeled with a first sign, others being labeled with a second sign and still others being labeled with a third sign, and a grid whereby a plurality of second equal spaces are marked in the central portion of said board to form a square, each of said second spaces being labeled with a fourth sign having a given color. The

Patented Jan. 11, 1966 game apparatus also includes position markers for 10- cating the players position on said track and a plurality of progress markers for determining the portion of said grid covered by a player. A die is used for determining by chance a players posit-ion on the track. In addition, the game apparatus has a mechanism adapted to operate as a roulette wheel which has a plurality of fourth signs of varied colors spaced around its circumference. Finally, coins are used for playing the mechanism.

In order to facilitate understanding of the present invention, reference will now be made to the appended drawings of a preferred specific embodiment of the present invention. Such drawings should not be construed as limiting the invention which is properly set forth in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the mechanism of the present invention adapted to play music and operate movable means.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the mechanism of FIG. 1 with the front wall removed and showing the movable means in outline only.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 2 taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 2 taken along the line 4--4 of FIG. 2 showing a portion of the operation of the mechanism, i.e. the point immediately prior to the disengagement of the transfer means from the music means.

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 wherein another portion of the operation of the mechanism is shown, i.e. the point immediately after the disengagement of the transfer means from the music means.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 2 taken along the line 66 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 7 shows a detail of FIG. 2 showing a portion of its operation, i.e. the point immediately after the engageent of the transfer means and the music means.

PEG. 8 is a plan view of the front wall of the mechanism shown in FIG. 1 showing the movable means attached thereto.

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of FIG. 8 taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of a portion of FIG. 8. 1

FIG. 11 shows a detail of FIG. 8.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of the board portion of the game apparatus used in the game of the present invention.

FIG. 13 is a plan view of the various other portions of the game apparatus of the present invention.

As illustrated in FIGS. 11l, the mechanism 20 of the present invention is a simple, compact mechanism adapted to play music and operate movable means by said playing. The mechanism 20 includes a front wall 21, a rear wall 22 and a side wall 23. The front wall 21 has a window 24 therein through which the operation of the movable means may be observed as set forth below. Also, the front wall 21 has an aperture 25 adapted to pass coins 113 therethrough. The bottom of the mechanism 20 has a trapdoor 26 with hinges 27 along one side and snap locks 28 connecting the other side to the rear wall 22. The door 26 opens into a chamber 29 separated from the remainder of the mechanism 20 by a partition 19. The coin aperture 25 communicates with the chamber 29 so that the coins 113 can be recovered from chamber 29 by means of the trapdoor 26. Preferably, the front wall 21 has a pinrality of ridges 21a along its length to impart rigidity and strength thereto. In addition, the front wall 21 has an angular ridge 21b adapted to adjoin the partition 19. Finally, the front wall 21 has a bottom ridge 21c and a plurality of lugs 21d which facilitate its placement with respect to the side wall 23.

The mechanism includes a music means for playing a predetermined tune, a movable means 56 for producing a predetermined result, and a transfer means 80 actuated by the playing of said music means 30 for energizing and initiating the operation of said movable means. The music means 30 has already been described in detail in earlier patents, such as the Handler patent set forth, and US. Patent No. 2,630,655, issued to T. R. Duncan on March 10, 1953. In general, the music means 31) comprises a comb 31 having a frame 32 and a series of resonant teeth 33 adapted to play a predetermined tune when plucked in proper sequence. The teeth 33 are mounted in the base portion 34- of the frame 32 and between the wings 35 and 36, respectively, of the frame 32. Journaled between the wings 35 and 36 is a first axle 37. The first axle 37 has a handle 33 connected thereto which is adapted to rotate the first axle 37 by the application of external manual force. Parallel to the first axle 37 and spaced therefrom is a second axle 39 journaled in a bracket 49. Both the bracket 40 and the comb 31 are riveted to the rear wall 22 of the apparatus 20. Rotatably mounted adjacent the comb 31 over the first and second axles 37 and 39 is a continuous flexible belt 41 having a. plurality of ears 42 adapted to pluck the teeth 33 of the comb 31 in proper sequence when the belt 41 is rotated by means of the handle 38. Mounted .on thebelt 41 is also a boss 43 which is adapted to actuate the transfer means 8% by engagement therewith at a predetermined point and disengagement therefrom at a subsequent predetermined second point during the playing of the music means 3G).

I The movable means includes, generally, a rotatably mounted circular means 51 having a plurality of symbols 52 marked around its circumference. A stop means 53 is operatively associated with the circular means 51 for permitting the rotation of the circular means 51 through a substantial angle and then halting its rotation at any one of a series of spaced angular positions 54. Each of the angular positions 54 causes the exhibition of a specific group of symbols 52 through the window 24 in the front cover 21. Finally, the movable means Stl includes a catch means 55 for imparting the energy of the transfer means 80 to the movable means 50 and initiating its operation.

As illustrated in FIGS. 1-11, the circular means 51 comprises a drum 56 having a plurality of symbols 52 marked around the circumference of its side walls. Thus, the drum 56 operates effectively as a roulette wheel. At one end of drum 56 is a conical end wall 57 which is journaled in the brace 58 attached to the front wall 21. Preferably, the brace 58 is supported by means of a post 59 extending from the rear Wall 22 of the apparatus 20.

The other end of the drum 56 has a spider 60 with a plurality of arms 61 each of which is seated in a recess 66 of the drum 56. At the end of each arm 61 of the spider 60 is a lip 62 which extends substantially parallel to the axis of the drum 56 and beyond its ends. Since the spider 60 is made of magnetic metal, the lips 62 form a series of pieces of magnetic metal spaced around the circumference ofthe drum 56. In other words, the lips 62 form a portion of the "stop means 53. Another portion of the stop means 53 is a permanent magnet 63 mounted in a housing 64 on the front wall 21 and maintained in such housing by means of a post 65 extending from the rear wall 22. The permanent magnet 63 is positioned adjacent the circumferential series of. metal pieces formed by the lips 62.

The spider 60 is maintained in the recesses 66 by means of a conical cap 70 having a circumferential series of buttons 71 extending therefrom. The buttons71 are adapted to be slidably received between the arms 61 of the spider 6t and abut against the end of the drum 56. Thus, the buttons 71and the lips 62 form a series of notches 72 spaced around the circumference of the drum 56. The

catch means 55 is formed by the notches 72 on the drum 56 and the notches 72 are adapted to temporarily engage transfer means when it moves thereby.

The transfer means 86 is actuated by the playing of the music means 31) and is adapted to energize and initiate the operation of the movable means 50. The transfer means 89 comprises an arm 81 slidably mounted on the wing 35 of the comb 31 by means of a yoke 82. Thus, the arm 81 is adapted to move tangentially by the movable means 50 (see particularly FIGS. 35). The arm 81 has a first finger 83 adapted to engage the music means 30 at a predetermined first point and disengage therefrom at a subsequent predetermined second point during the playing of the music means. As illustrated, the predetermined first point is the point at which the boss 43 of the belt 41 initially engages the first finger 83 of the arm 81, as shown inFlG. 7. The subsequent predetermined secend point is the point at which the boss 43 is disengaged from the first finger 83, as illustrated in FIG. 4. The engagement of the finger 83 and the boss 43 is adapted to move the arm 81 toward the movable means 50 during the playing of the music means 31).

The arm 81 has a second finger 84 adapted to temporarily engage with the movable means 50 when the arm 31 moves thereby. As illustrated in FIG. 5, particularly, the second finger 84 engages the notches 72' of the catch means 55. Connected to the arm 81 is a spring means 9t) adapted to bias the arm 81 against moving generally towards the movable means 5t} and to cause the arm 81 to return immeditely to its initial position when disengaged from the music means 31). The spring means comprises a wire 91 fixedly mounted in a post 92 at one end and riding against a pin 93 mounted on the arm 81 at its other end. Thus, as the arm 81 moves towards the movable means Stl, the wire 1 is continuously subjected to bending forces tending to resist such movement of the arm .81. The wire 91 is maintained in the post 92 by the winged post 94 on the front wall 21 during its distortion by the arm 81. Adjacent the movable means St) is a block means 95. The block means 95 is adjacent the movable means 50 and separated from the arm 31 by the movable means 59. The block means 95 is adapted to disengage the arm 81 from the music means 30 and, as illustrated, the block means 95 is formed by the post 65 supporting the magnet 63.

The operation of the mechanism 26 is initiated by the manual rotation of the handle 38. Such rotation causes the belt 41 to rotate about its two axles 37 and 39. The rotation of the belt 41 in turn causes the ears 42 to pass in plucking engagement with the teeth 33 of the comb 31. Such plucking engagement, as noted above, causes the comb 31 to play a predetermined tune. After a given period of rotation, the boss 43 on the belt 41 comes into engagement with the first finger 83 of arm 81 of the transfer means 8%. Such engagement is illustrated, for example, in FIG. 7 and moves the arm 81 toward the movable means 50 despite the bias exerted by the wire M against such movement.

The forward stroke of the arm 81 continues until the first finger 83 strikes the blocking means 95, i.e. the post 65. When such contact is made further forward movement of the arm 81 is prevented. However, the belt 41 being flexible continues to rotate, causing the boss 43 to become disengaged from the finger 83 by bending away therefrom and then snapping thereby. Upon disengagement from the music means 3%, the arm 81 of the transfer means 30 immediately returns to its initial position due to the bias of the wire 91. However, during such return stroke, the second finger 84 engages the notch 72 formed by the lips 62 while thearm 81 passes by the movable means 50. Such temporary engagement energizes the drum 56 by imparting a rotational impulse thereto and initiates its operation.

Once the rotation of the drum 56 has been initiated, it continues through a substantial angle, such as 10 to 20 revolutions. However, the permanent magnet 63 exerts a braking efiYect upon such rotation due to its interaction with the pieces of magnetic metal spaced around the circumference of the drum, i.e. the lips 62. Finally, the attraction of the magnet 63 for one of the lips 62 passing adjacent thereto becomes greater than the rotational inertia of the drum 56 so that such lip 62 becomes locked into position adjacent the magnet 63. Such locking causes the drum 56 to assume a specific angular position with a lip 62 directly opposite the magnet 63. Thus, the drum 56 may assume any one of a series of spaced angular positions. Such specific angular position causes a specific group of symbols 52 to be exhibited through the window 24 in the front wall 21.

It should be noted that the lips 62 are spaced so that when a first lip 62 is positioned directly opposite the magnet 63 a second lip 62 is positioned in the path of th second finger 84 of the arm 81. Such positioning of the second lip 62 permits the second finger 84 to engage directly therewith without interference from another lip 62 during the return stroke of the arm 81. Also, it should be noted that such positioning of the second lip 62 causes it to temporarily engage the second finger 84 during the forward stroke of the arm 81. Such temporary engagement, however, merely causes the rotating drum 56 to rotate slowly to its next angular position and so the arm 81 passes thereby without causing the drum 56 to rotate through a substantial angle. It is only during the high speed return stroke of the arm 81 that the engagement of the second finger 84 in the notch 72 imparts substantial rotational energy to the drum 56.

The game apparatus of the present invention involves the combined risk of dice and roulette as well as the suspense of bingo. As illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, the game apparatus comprises a board 100 having a track 101 formed by a series of first spaces 102 marked around its periphery. Each of the first spaces 102 is labeled with a blank sign 103, a coin sign 104, a music sign 105, or a monkey sign 115. In the central portion of the game board 100 is a grid 106 formed by a plurality of second equal spaces 107 marked therein to form a square. Each of the equal spaces 107 is labeled with a musical note sign 108 having a given color. Some typical colors are red, green, purple, yellow, blue and orange. Also, the board 100 has a start space 109 in the track 101.

Combined with the board 100 in the game apparatus is a position marker 110 which is used for locating a players position on the track 101. A plurality of progress markers 111 are then used to determine a portion of the grid 106 covered by a player. A die 112 is used to determine by chance the players position on the track and a coin 113 permits the playing of apparatus 20 when the position marker 112 lands on a music sign on the track 101. It should be noted, as set forth above, that the mechanism 20 is adapted to play music and operate as a roulette wheel having a plurality of groups of musical note signs of varied colors spaced around its circumference. However, other forms of a roulette wheel may be utilized in the present invention to perform this portion of the game apparatus.

The operation of the game apparatus of the present invention may best be explained in connection with the rules of game which may be played thereon. However, it should be noted that the game described below is only one of many games which may be played with this apparatus. One game which may be played with such apparatus involves two to four players with each player having a board 100, a position marker 110 and initially two coins 113. The balance of the coins (approximately 40-46) are placed to one side in a bank for which one player can be responsible. Also, the progress markers 111 are put to one side to form a drawing pile to be used during the game. The object of this particular game is for a player to get five progress markers 111 in a row 6. on the grid 106. By moving a position marker around the track 101 a player gets a chance to pay and play the mechanism 20 and cover the matching musical note signs 108 in the grid 106.

Before starting, a progress marker is placed in the center space 107 of the grid 106 to provide a free space. After the first player has been chosen, he places his position marker 110 on the start space 109 of his board 100. The first player then rolls the die 112 once to determine the number of spaces to move his position marker 110 in the direction indicated by the arrow of the start space 109 (i.e. counterclockwise around the track 101). If the position marker 110 lands on a coin space 104, the first player draws one coin 113 from the bank. If the position marker 110 lands on a monkey space 115, the player is permitted to roll die 112 again for an extra turn and if he lands on another monkey space 115 he takes a third turn. If the position marker 110 lands on a music sign and the player has a coin 113, he may then play the mechanism 20.

In order to play the mechanism 20, the player must first put the coin 113 into the slot 25. The player then turns the crank and plays the tune on the mechanism until the rotating drum 56 (the roulette wheel) has a substantial rotation imparted thereto. After the drum 56 stops rotating, the player looks at the colored musical note signs in the window 24 of the mechanism 20. For each musical note sign 52 on the drum 56 one musical note sign 108 of the board 100 of the same color is covered with a progress marker 111. For example, if the drum 56 shows one blue note and one yellow note in the window the player covers one blue note and one yellow note on the board 100 using progress markers 111. However, the player has a free choice of notes of the same color in order to pick one that will help him line up five notes in a row.

If a player lands on a music sign space and has no coins 113, he may not play the mechanism 20 and he may not borrow coins 113 from the bank. The winner of the game is the first player to get five covered music note signs 108 in a row on the grid 106 and such row may be across, down, or on a diagonal from corner to corner on the grid 106. Before beginning a new game, trap door 26 on the bottom of the apparatus 20 should be opened and all the coins emptied therefrom.

Many other specific embodiments of the present invention will be obvious to one skilled in the art in view of this disclosure. For example, with reference to the mechanism 20, the belt 41 may be rotatably mounted about a single axle or it may be in the form of a circular disc, such as illustrated in US. Patent No. 2,562,896 issued to T. R. Duncan on August 7, 1951, so long as the transfer means 80 is permitted to become engaged and then disengaged from the music means 30. Similarly, the drum 56 of the movable means may be marked on its end surfaces or consist of simply a rotatable disc. Also, as illustrated, the movable means 50 in elfect operates as a roulette wheel to produce a predetermined result of selectively choosing a specific group of symbols, i.e. a group of musical notes of various colors. However, other movable means may be employed in the mechanism of the present invention, such as a pivoted arm to propel a ball or sliding disc so that they produce the predetermined result of making a score.

There are many features of the present invention which clearly show a significant advance the present invention represent over the prior art. Consequently, only a few of the more outstanding features will be pointed out to illustrate the unexpected and unusual results attained by the present invention. One feature of the present invention is a mechanism wherein a movable means is operated solely by the playing of music means. Thus, the playing of the music means energizes the movable means and then initiates the operation thereof. Also, the mechanism permits continuous playing with repeated operations of the movable means without additional manual operations.

It will be understood that the foregoing description and examples are only illustrative of the present invention and it is not intended that the invention be limited thereto. All substitutions, alterations and modifications of the present invention which come within the scope of the following claims or to which the present invention is readily susceptible without departing from the spirit and scope of this disclosure are considered parts of the present invention 1 claim:

1. A simple, compact mechanism adapted to play music and operate movable means by said playing comprising:

(a) music means for playinga predetermined tune;

(b) movable means for producing a predetermined result; and

(c) transfer means actuated by the playing of said music means for energizing and initiating the operation of said movable means;

((1) said movable means comprising rotatably mounted circular means having a plurality of symbols marked around its circumference;

(e) stop means for permitting the rotation of said circular means through a substantial angle and then halting the rotation of said circular means at any one of a series of spaced angular positions, each of said angular positions causing the exhibition of a specific group of said symbols on said circular means; and

(f) catch means for imparting the energy of said transfer means to said movable means and initiating its operation.

2. A mechanism as stated in claim 1 wherein said circular means comprises a drum having said plurality of symbol-s marked around the circumference of its side walls.

3. A mechanism as stated in claim 1 wherein said stop means comprises:

(a) a series of pieces of magnetic metal spaced around the circumference of said circular means; and

(b) a permanent magnet positioned adjacent said cir- (II) a continuous flexible belt rotatably mounted adjacent said comb having a plurality of ears adapted to pluck said teeth in said proper sequence when said belt is rotated; (b) movable means for producing a predetermined result; and (c) transfer means actuated by the playing of said music means for energizing and initiating the operation of said movable means, the belt of said music means having a boss mounted thereon adapted to actuate said transfer means by engagement therewith at a upredetermined first point and disengagement therefrom at a subsequent predetermined second point during the playing of said music means,'said tran e m ans includin (I) an arm slidably mountedto move tangentially by said movable means, said arm having a first finger adapted to engage With said boss at a predetermined first point and to be disengaged therefrom at a subsequent predetermined second point during the playing of said music means, with said engagement being adapted to generally move said arm toward said movable means during the playing of said music means, and having a second finger adapted to temporarily engage with saidmovable means when said arm moves thereby,

(II) spring means connected to said arm adapted to bias said arm against moving generally toward said movable means and to cause said arm to return immediately to its initial position when disengaged from said boss, and

(111) block means adjacent to said movable means and separated from said arm by said movable means, said block means being adapted to disengage said arm from said boss by stopping the movement of said arm while permitting said boss to slip under said first finger and pass thereby.

6. A simple, compact mechanism adapted to play music and operate movable means by said playing, comprising:

(a) music means for playing a predetermined tune;

(b) movable means for producing a predetermined result; and

(c) transfer means actuated by the playing of said music means for energizing and initiating the operation of said movable means;

(d) said transfer means comprising an arm slidably mounted to move tangentially by said movable means, said arm (I) having a first finger adapted to engage said music means at a predetrmined first point and to be disengaged therefrom at a subsequent predetermined second point during the playing of said music means, said engagement being adapted to generally move said arm toward said movable means during the playing of said music means,

(II) having a second finger adapted to temporarily engage said movable means when said arm moves thereby;

(e) spring means connected to said arm adapted to bias said arm against moving generally towards said movable means and to cause said arm to return immediately to its initial position when disengaged from said music means; and

(f) block means adjacent to said movable means and separated from said arm by said movable means, said block means being adapted to disengage said arm from said music means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,555,010 5/1951 Schnabolk 273 143 2,594,159 4/1952 Hanf 273 143 2,691,528 10/1954 Laidlaw 273-134 2,705,387 4/1955 Handler et al. 46-118 2,792,227 5/1957 Auerbach 273 134 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,269,588 7/1961 France.

DELBERT LOWE, Primary Examiner. EVERETT R. ZACK, Assistant Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2555010 *Mar 22, 1948May 29, 1951Schnabolk FredMechanical party rotating disk game
US2594159 *Apr 23, 1947Apr 22, 1952Hanf Wesley ARotating disk automatic lotto game
US2691528 *Nov 1, 1951Oct 12, 1954Laidlaw RonaldChance-controlled game device
US2705387 *Apr 13, 1953Apr 5, 1955Elliot HandlerAnimatable musical toy
US2792227 *Sep 20, 1954May 14, 1957Auerbach MaryChance controlled game device
FR1269588A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3656751 *Jan 9, 1969Apr 18, 1972Marvin Glass & AssociatesBoard game apparatus
US4225140 *Aug 28, 1978Sep 30, 1980Andrade Bruce M DTarget-type shooting toy
US4655726 *Oct 2, 1985Apr 7, 1987Mattel, Inc.Toy doll figure for displaying colors
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/143.00C, 273/243, 273/269, 40/518
International ClassificationA63H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H5/00
European ClassificationA63H5/00