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Publication numberUS3229414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1966
Filing dateApr 30, 1963
Priority dateDec 15, 1962
Also published asDE1478293A1, DE1478293B2, DE1478293C3, DE1478297A1, US3229410, US3229416
Publication numberUS 3229414 A, US 3229414A, US-A-3229414, US3229414 A, US3229414A
InventorsKarl Bross Helmut
Original AssigneeFrank T Johmann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Propeller-driven toy
US 3229414 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 18, 1966 H. K. BROSS PROPELLER-DRIVEN TOY 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 30, 1963 INVENTOR HELMUT KARL BROSS Jan. 18, 1966 H. K. BROSS PROPELLER-DRIVEN TOY 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 30, 1963 5 m Cl Illlll INVENTOR HELMUT KARL BROSS BYT Jan. 18, 1966 H. K. BROSS 3,229,414

PROPELLER-DRIVEN TOY Filed April 30, 1963 6 Sheet-Sheet :s

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NVENTOR HELMUT KARL BROSS symra tmw Jan. 18, 1966 H. K. BROSS PROPELLER-DRIVEN TOY 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 30, 1963 IOI- FIG. l9

FIGZO INVENTOR HELMUT KARL BROS S Jan. 18, 1966 H. K. BROSS 3,229,414

PROPELLER-DRIVEN TOY Filed April 30, 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR HELMUT KARL BROSS BY nwkvimw.

United States Patent 3,229,414 PROPELLER-DRIVEN TOY Helmut Karl Bross, Altenberg uber Nurnherg, Germany,

This invention relates to toys. Particularly, the invention relates to toys driven by a pulling member, e.g. a rack engageable with a pinion drive gear, whereby movement of said pulling member is converted into rotational energy stored in said toys, and then used to drive said toys.

The present invention is widely applicable to a wide variety of toys which use rotational energy for their drive, including so-called flying saucers; airplanes; helicopters; boats; wheeled vehicles, such as toy autos; flying animals, such as butterflies and birds; tops; gyroscopic toys; rockets; etc. The present invention represents further improvements on my invention described in my prior US. patent application, Serial Number 257,432, filed February 11, 1963, under the title Toy. In said prior patent application and also in the present invention, a series of diiferent toys are driven by a pulling band, e.g. a rack in engagement with a pinion drive gear of the toys. The rack can be conveniently molded of slightly flexible plastic, for example polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, etc., in either a flat stripor to save space and for convenience, in an arcuate form, for example a semi-circular form. In the latter case, the slightly flexible rack will tend to straighten out, even though arcuate, as it is rapidly drawn through the toy, during the operating or power stroke. At the same time, these plastic racks are stiif enough so that the end of the rack can be readily inserted or threaded into the toy so as to engage the pinion drive gear teeth.

The present invention represents further improvements by providing very simple toy embodiments which can be manufactured at low cost with a minimum material and assembly labor. One aspect included in the present invention is in mounting the propelling or energy storing wheel on a hub, which hub defines both the gear teeth and an annular shoulder for guiding the rack. Another aspect included in the present invention is in molding axle stubs directly as an integral part of the main body of the toy, which axle stubs, preferably terminate in a conical end for easy assembly onto the rotatable hub element. Another aspect included in this invention resides in integrally molding guide surfaces of the main body of the toy, proximate said axle stubs. Other aspects of the invention are in the provision of exceedingly inexpensive simple forms of various toys which can be made with a minimum of parts and cost, are simple tooperate, and are interesting, as well as the provision of novel toys. The aforesaid, and other advantages and aspects of the present invention will be further understood by reterences to the following descriptions and drawings which include a preferred embodiment of the invention and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side view, partly in section, of a helicopter toy of the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a top view, partly broken away, of the helicopter of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 1, wherein the pulling band and propeller unit are omitted.

FIGURE 4 is a top view, on reduced scale, of a plastic rack in an arcuate shape, which can be used with the helicopter of FIGURES 1 to 3.

FIGURE 5 is a side view of a toy auto in engagement with a plastic pulling rack.

FIGURE 6 is a top view of the auto of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 77 of FIGURE 6.

FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional view, similar to that of FIGURE 7, but representing a modification of the embodiment of FIGURES 5 to 7.

FIGURE 9 is a side view, partly in section, of a toy racing car of the invention driven by a rotating fan.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view taken along the line 1010 of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 11 is a sectional view taken along the line 1111 of FIGURE 8.

FIGURE 12 is a plan view, partly in section, of a toy rocket utilizing a fan drive similar to that of FIGURES 9 to 11.

FIGURE 13 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 1313 of FIGURE 12, which illustrates the fiat portion of the rocket.

FIGURE 14 is a side view, partly in section, of a toy motor boat utilizing the fan drive of FIGURES 9 through 13.

FIGURE 15 is a sectional view taken along the line l515 of FIGURE 14.

FIGURE 16 is a side view of a toy motor boat utilizing said fan drive and wherein the body of the boat is formed of a single piece of plastic.

FIGURE 17 is a cross-sectional view of the boat of FIGURE 16 taken along the line 1717 of FIGURE 16.

FIGURE 18 is a top view of another toy boat wherein the body of the boat is formed of a single integral piece of plastic and wherein the fan drive is located on the boat so as to operate while partly submerged in the water.

FIGURE 19 is a side view, partly in cross-section, of the embodiment of FIGURE 18.

FIGURE 20 is a plan view, partly in section, of a flying butterfly toy.

FIGURE 21 is a sectional view taken along the line 2121 of FIGURE 20.

' FIGURE 22 i s a side view, partly in section, of an airplane.

FIGURE 23 is a sectional view taken along the line 2323 of FIGURE 22.

- FIGURE 24 is a side view, partly in section, of a top.

FIGURE 25 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 25-25 of FIGURE 24.

FIGURE 26 is a plan view, partly broken, of a rack wherein the teeth have been replaced by a series of perforations and the rack is straight.

FIGURE 27 is a sectional view of a hub, having gear teeth for engagement with the rack of FIGURE 26, which hub is integral with a propelling fan (not shown).

FIGURE 28 is a fragmentary side view of the [hub of FIGURE 27.

FIGURE 29 is a plan view, partly broken, of another pulling rack of the invention wherein the teeth are in the form of beads.

FIGURE 30 is a sectional view of a hub adapted for use with the pulling band of FIGURE 29, which hub can be connected to a fan or propeller (not shown).

FIGURE 31 is a fragmentary side view of the hub of FIGURE 30.

FIGURE 32 illustrates a \drive mechanism wherein the guide is a rotatable collar.

Reference is now made in detail to the embodiment of FIGURES 1 to 4. Here, the plastic, e.g., polyethylene, helicopter has a flat, light weight, body portion, including the broad area tail 1 to minimize rotation of the body, the boom 2 and the thickened forward body section 3 which defines the molded figure 4. Extending the width of body portion 3, is the wedge-shaped strengthening rib 5 whose upper end 6 extends upwardly past body portion 3 in order to define a rack guide surface. The axle stub 7 is injection molded of plastic integrally with body portion 3 and extends upwardly from said portion 3 to define the conical end 8, and the annular shoulder 9. The propeller, or fan, unit includes the outer momentumstoring wheel or rim 10 joined by the propeller blades 11 to the hub 12. The lower or pinion portion of the hub 12 defines the gear teeth 13. The hollow hub 12 is assembled onto the axle stub 7 by merely pushing the tubular hub 12 over the cone 8 while the slightly elastic hub 12 is able to expand or distort sufliciently outwardly due to the hollow :arcs 19 defined in the upper portion of the slightly resilient plastic hub 12. In this way, the propeller unit is freely rotatable around the cylindrical axle stub 7, while held between the top edge of body portion 3 and the annular shoulder 9 of said cone 8. In operation, a plastic toothed rack 15, formed with a series of gear teeth 16 and terminating in the handle 17, is pushed into meshing engagement with the complementary gear teeth 13 while being guided by the rib portion 6, the top edge 18 of body portion 3, and the annular flange 14 of the hub 12. As the rack 15 is pushed through the helicopter, its teeth 16 will mesh with the complementary pinion gear teeth 13, thus rotating the entire propeller unit in a clock-wise direction (when viewed from the top). The rack 15 is pushed in until the handle 17 is as close to the body 3 as is convenient. The thickened and therefore more rigid body portion 3, is then held firmly with one hand by the child, while the child rapidly pulls, with his other hand, the rack 15 away from the body by means of handle -17. This causes a very rapid rotation of the pinion teeth 13, which rotation is transferred to the propeller unit and momentum is correspondingly stored in the blades 11 and ring 10. Once rack 15 is pulled completely out of engagement with pinion teeth 13, so as to be clear of the helicopter, the helicopter is released, whereupon it can then raise vertically into flight. Due to its exceedingly light weight, excellent flight performance is obtained.

While the rack 15, has a flat shape as shown, the rack can be conveniently molded in an 'arcuate shape of slightly flexible plastic, e.g., polyethylene, as shown in FIGURE 4. Here the rack 15' has teeth 16' and the handle 17. This rack 15' can be used in exactly the same manner as rack 15 with the helicopter of FIGURES 1 to 3. During the power stroke, i.e. when the previously inserted rack 15' is rapidly pulled out from the helicopter, the rack 15 will tend to straighten out due to its slight flexibility so that the arcuate shape of FIGURE 4 works as effectively and simply as the straight rack 15. However, for convenience of packaging, e.g. in clear plastic bags, the arcuate type rack, e.g. rack 15', is generally easier to package and requires a much smaller package than a flat rack 15 of corresponding length. In this way, the helicopter can be packaged for retail as a substantially flat package of 3 pieces, namely the helicopter body, the propeler unit (which is subsequently assembled by the user upon the axle stub 7), and the arcuate rack 15, which preferably defines an arc of substantially the same diameter as propeller ring 10.

By injection molding all of said 3 pieces of plastic, a low cost toy is achieved, with no factory assembly required, which is easily packaged and can be packed and shipped substantially flat so as to minimize the danger of damage by squashing. Also, due to the light weight of the helicopter, excellent flights of good height and distance can be achieved.

On the other hand, prior toy helicopters are usually of heavier and more complicated construction, and are powered by winding a string or a cord around the propeller hub and then pulling. This is a very slow and. delicate operation, particularly for a small child, characterized by the string frequently slipping, beco ming tangled, breaking, etc. invention, the self-supporting, stiff, although slightly flexible, rack, e.g., 15 or 15, is simply pushed through the helicopter into positive direct engagement with the propeller hub and then pulled out in a simple, effieient manner readily achieved bya typical 5-year-old child, or younger, with good results. Furthermore, when made of tough plastic, e.g. polyethylene, the toy is extremely rugged, durable and safe.

FIGURES 5 to 7 represent the invention applied to a toy auto having the body 30 into which is journaled the rotatable axles 31 and 32 having fixed onto their outer ends wheels 33. The hub 34 of one wheel defines on its periphery a series of splines or gear teeth 35. A guide rail 36, which can be molded integrally with the toy body 30, serves as a guide for the removable toothed rack 37 to hold it in meshing toothed engagement with complementary teeth 35. Upon supporting the vehicles in the air, so that the front drive wheel fixed to hub 34 can rotate freely, and after inserting the rack 37 into meshing engagement with gear teeth 35, as illustrated for example in FIGURE 6, and then rapidly pulling out the rack by means of handle 38, the front pair of wheels 33 are set into a rapid spinning motion so that upon complete withdrawal of the rack 37 and setting the toy onto a flat surface 39, it will be driven forward due to the momentum stored in the now rapidly rotating, relatively heavy front wheels 33 which act as flywheels. Preferably, Wheels 33 are metal so as to be heavy to thereby have more momentum.

FIGURE 8 represents a modification of the toy auto of FIGURES 5 to 7. Here, the wheels 33' and hubs 34 are fixed to axle 31 journaled in body 30'. A heavy flywheel 40 is fixed to shaft 41, whose upper end defines the pinion gear teeth 42. Flanges 43 and 44 fixed to shaft 41, and apertured plate 45 rotatably support the shaft 41. The guide 36' extends upwardly from body 30 proximate the teeth 42. The previously inserted rack 37, when rapidly pulled across teeth 42, will spin shaft 41 and the heavy flywheel 40 fixed to the lower end of shaft 41. Rotational energy, thus stored in this manner in flywheel 40, is transmitted by the bevel gear 48, fixed to the end of shaft 41, to the larger diameter meshing bevel gear 47 fixed to shaft 31'. Power is thus transmitted to drive wheels 33' fixed to shaft 31'. In this manner, a lower speed (as compared to the embodiment of FIGURES 5 to 7) is achieved through the speed reducing gearing thus shown, but more power is available to the wheels so there is a smoother start when the auto is initially placed into contact with a surface 39. Also, a slower rate of speed is achieved so that the auto can be better used in a limited space, e.g. a play room.

FIGURES 9 to 11 represent another embodiment of the invention, wherein a toy racing car having the one-piece molded plastic body 50, including the figure 51, is integrally formed with the axle stub 52 and the guide member 53. Wheels 54 are freely rotatable about axles 55 fixed to the flat body portion 50. Rotatably mounted on the axle stub 52 is the propelling fan assembly F, including the outer rim 56 fixedly connected to the hub 57 by fan blades or vanes 58. The hollow hub 57, is assembled onto axle stub 52 by merely passing it over the split, slightly flexible, conical half-sections 59, so that the hub 57 is rotatable, while held between the end wall 60 and the an nular flange 61. The inner or pinion portion of the hub 57 is of reduced diameter so as to define the annular flange 62 and the gear teeth 63. To operate, the child holds the body while the end of rack 64 is simply threaded or pushed between the opening defined by guide 53, edge 60, and rim 62, into meshing engagement with the complementary gear teeth 63 until the handle 65 of the rack is pushed inwardly towards the toy as far as is convenient. To facilitate this insertion and to reduce friction on the drive or pulling-out stroke, the guide member 53 is preferably formed in a semi-circular shape so as to present as little In comparison, with the present,

surface contact as possible to the rack 64. Upon firmly grasping handle 65, and rapidly pulling it out from the held toy, the fan assembly F is spun at a very rapid speed. Then, upon setting the car onto a surface, for example a side-walk, the car will be driven rapidly forward due to the propelling tan action of the blades 58 until the spinning momentum is lost and the auto coasts to a stop.

FIGURES 12 and 13 represents a toy space rocket which is driven upwardly into the air by a fan action. Specifically, the toy has the one-piece flat body 713 simulating the appearance of a rocket with flat vane 0r tail portion 71 to minimize rotation of the body during flight. The lower end of vane portion 71 is formed with the integrally molded axle stub portion 520 and the rack guide portion 530. A fan unit F is rotatably mounted on the axle stub 52a. The operation of the fan F and rack 64 is exactly the same as described in detail with the embodiments of FIGURES 9 to 11, those parts designated with a, being similar to those parts similarly numbered in FIGURES 9 to 11, with the exception that in place of being mounted on a toy racing car, they are mounted on a toy space rocket. The toy is held vertically while the fan F is spun with rack 64, and is then released into flight after the rack is pulled completely free of the rocket.

FIGURES 14 and 15 represent a toy motor boat having the hull 80, formed by cementing together the hull halves 8i) and S9", and the flat vane 81 which carries the fan propelling unit F which is the same as that represented by the letter F in the prior figures. Van 81 is preferably entirely molded as part of hull half 80 so that its axle stub 52b and guide stub 53b have no seams. The operation of fan F and rack 64 is the same as previously described With regard to the embodiments of FIGURES 9 to 13, except that after the rack 64 has been pulled clear of its engagement with pinion teeth 63, the boat is set in water 82 where it is driven forward by the fan F now rapidly spinning in the air.

FIGURES 16 and 17 represent a toy boat having the one-piece hull 90 molded of plastic, including the figure 91 and the flat vane 97, which carries the propelling fan unit F, previously described, on axle stub 52c proximate guide stub 53c, both of which are integrally molded with vane 92. Operation is similar to that described with regard to the embodiment of FIGURES 14 and 15. While the hull 90 has an open bottom, it floats when placed in the water 93 by entrapping air within the enclosed space 94.

FIGURES 18 and 19 represent another toy boat including the one-piece plastic injection molded body 1019, defining the cocltpit 1111 and the section 162 which is buoyant by means of entrapped air when set in Water 1113. Molded integrally with the rear of the boat is the cylindrical axle stub 52d and the guide member 530'. Rotatable on stub 52d, is the fan unit F. The operation is similar to that described in detail with the embodiments of FIGURES 8 to 1'7. Specifically, the boat is held out of the water while the fan F is rotated by rapidly pulling the plastic rack 54 across the pinion teeth 63. Once the rack 64 is drawn completely free of engagement with the pinion teeth, the boat is then set in the water 163 whereupon it is driven forward, part of the fan F rotating directly in the water and serving as a propeller. Due to the slowing drag of the water on propelling fan F, the fan F can be advantageously made of metal, e.g. by diecasting, so as to have a greater weight and more momentum to counteract the drag of the water.

FIGURES 20 and 21 represent a simple toy which can be in the form of an animal or insect, for example a bird or a butterfly, having the flat wing portion 110 and integral therewith, the axle stub 52s, which also simulates a body, and guide 53a. Rotatably held on stub 52:: is the propelling t'an unit F. Upon pulling the previously inserted rack 64 rapidly out of engagement with the pinion teeth 63, the fan F is rapidly rotated, whereupon release of the toy will send the butterfly toy into flight.

FIGURES 22 and 23 represent a horizontal flying airplane, having the flat fuselage carrying the fixed wings 121 and the tail 122. Mounted on the forward end of fuselage 120, and formed integrally therewith, are the axle stub 123 and the guide member 124. Rotatably carried on cylindrical stub 123 is the propeller unit including the hollow hub 125 connected to the outer wheel or rim 126 by propeller blades 127. Upon pulling the plastic rack 127, by means of its handle 129, rapidly across the meshing pinion teeth 128 and clear of its meshing engagement with said teeth 128, the propeller is set into rapidly spinning motion so as to carry the airplane into flight upon its release by the child.

FIGURE 24 represents a hollow top, having the conical point 139 fixed to the bottom of the hollow shell 131. Integral with the top of shell 131, is the tubular pinion gear 132. A handle 133 is rotatably linked to shell 131 by means of its shaft 134 having the retaining split conical ends 135, which grip the inside of shell 131. Handle 133 defines the tab 136 which serves as a guide for the insertion of toothed rack 64. After rack 64 is inserted through the handle 133 into meshing engagement with the complementary teeth of pinion gear 132, the top is set with its point 13!) on a floor 137, while supported by the child holding handle 133. The rack 64 is then rapidly pulled out from the top, while in the aforesaid position, so as to spin the shell 131 about its point 130, and the shaft 134. The handle is then let go, so the top is now in free spinning motion.

While the preceding has illustrated the use of a toothed rack as the pulling band or strap for engagement with a pinion gear, the pulling band and the pinion gear may take forms other than those described so far. For example, the pulling band or rack can be a band 140 where the teeth are defined between the perforations 141, said band having the pulling handle 142, as illustrated in FIG- URE 26. This rack can be used while in engagement with appropriately meshing teeth, for example the modification of fan F illustrated in FIGURES 27 and 28 where the hub 57 is formed with the pinion teeth 63'. Another alternate design of the pulling rack is illustrated in FIG- URE 29 where the teeth are in the form of round beads linked together by the links 151 so as to be in the form of a chain. A rack of this sort can be used in engagement with an appropriately designed pinion gear, for example that of FIGURES 30 and 31.

Here the beads 15!] are received in the recesses defined between teeth 63 and hub 57" mounted on an axle stub 52.

Another modification of the invention is shown in FIGURE 32. Here an axle stub 52 carries the hub 57 of constant diameter, but having its inner portion defining the gear teeth 63 The guide for rack 64 consists of the second smaller axle stub 160, rotatably carrying the roller 161 having the annular flange 162. Axle stubs and 52 are molded integrally with the flat body portion 163 which can be part of a boat, or racing car, etc. Here the flange 162 serves as a guide for rack 64, while the roller 161 reduces friction upon the insertion and pulling out of rack 64.

All the pulling bands or racks shown in the drawings can be molded either as flat strips, or more preferably in an arcuate form, for example, as shown in FIGURE 4, of a tough slightly flexible and elastic plastic, e.g. polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, etc. Frequently, when another part of the toy involves a large circular piece, such as the propeller Wheel of FIGURES 1 to 3, the rack can be molded in an arcuate shape around the propeller wheel so as to have the shape illustrated by FIGURE 4. Alternatively, the plastic racks can be molded, one inside the other while defining arcs of different radius. Polyethylene is the preferred plastic. However, since these plastic racks are slightly flexible, the normally arcuate racks will tend to straighten out when rapidly drawn through the toy during the operating or power stroke. Once free of the pinion gear, the rack will return to its normally arcuate form due to the elasticity of the plastic. The racks or pulling bands of the invention are self-supporting, i.e. they have a definite shape and are stiff enough so that the end of the rack can readily be inserted into the toy so as to engage the pinion gear teeth. Both the insertion and withdrawal of the rack is simply and quickly done by a child in a foolproof manner. On the other hand, prior toys utilizing a pull-string, or similar material, e.g. cloth tapes, require considerable time to wind the string and frequently the pull-string becomes tangled or slips. Such pull-strings are commonly used with tops or gyroscopic toys, for example. The racks of the invention overcome these disadvantages of tangling and slippage common to pull-strings as well as avoiding the long winding time inherent with pull-strings. Thus, the direct positive engagement of pulling band pinion avoids slipping, and permits a hard operating stroke so as to obtain high torque and a high rotational velocity which increases the ranges of the toy, e.g. the flying distance. Furthermore, to use a pull-string, the part around which the pull-string is to be wound has to be readily accessible to the child. On the other hand, the rack of the invention can be easily and quickly inserted into, or through the toy for engagement with a drive shaft within the body of the toy, thereby permitting a wider latitude in the design of the toy.

It will be apparent that a Wide latitude in the specific design of the toys of the invention is possible, although the various features shown are preferred. Thus, the annular ring, e.g. ring 10, which joins the outer end of the propeller blades can be omitted. However, its presence is generally preferred since not only does it store momentum, but it helps prevent distortion of the blades, e.g. blades 11, and in addition acts as a safety device by brushing away the childs hand or fingers from contact with the blades. Otherwise, contact with the unprotected blades, even when the blades are made of soft plastic such as polyethylene, can be somewhat painful due to the high velocity obtained during operation. The axle stub (e.g. 52) and guide (e.g. 53) are preferably molded integrally with the toy body, to avoid assembly, and preferably extend from an edge of the toy body so that the cylindrical axle butt can be molded with no seams which would tend to interfere with the rotation of the pinion gear. In addition, when molded integrally with a thin flat body portion, e.g. body portion 50 of FIGURE 9, the axle stub, e.g. stub 52, acts as a strengthening rib to make the fiat body portion more rigid at the point where it is subjected to stress and potential bending or distortion. The same can be true of the guide for the rack, e.g. see rib 5, 6 of FIGURE 1. For quick and easy insertion of the rack, guides extending perpendicular to the axis of the axle butt are generally preferred, for example, the guide flange 14 of FIGURE 1, the annular lip 62 of FIGURE 9, etc. However, this is not essential, since the pinion teeth themselves can prevent sideways slippage of the rack, e.g. see FIGURE 22 and FIGURE 28, although the rack in these latter cases has to be more carefully guided into meshing engagement with the pinion teeth. Guide surfaces, such as guide 53 of FIGURE 9, preferably have a shape to minimize frictional contact with the rack, e.g. a shape to provide a line contact with the rack, so as to obtain the most elficient use of the energy of the pulling stroke. Also, an arcuate shape as shown, permits more easy insertion of the rack and its guidance into meshing engagement with the pinion teeth.

Like or similar parts are indicated by the same numbers which may be followed by prime marks or by letters.

While plastic is the preferred material for forming the toys of the invention, other materials such as rubber, wood, metal, zinc die castings, etc., can be used as will be apparent to the skilled worker in the art.

What is claimed is:

1. A propeller-driven toy comprising a molded plastic body having a relatively thin, flat portion at an edge of said body, an axle stub molded integrally with said flat portion and including a cylindrical axle portion extending rearwardly from said edge and terminating in an outer end defining a flange having a diameter greater than the diameter of said cylindrical portion, said stub including a strengthening rib portion extending forwardly of said edge to thereby strengthen the area of said fiat portion proximate said axle stub, a propeller rotatably mounted on said axle portion including propeller blades and an integral tubular hub externally defining a pinion gear, said hub having an inner diameter less than said flange, one of said hub and said outer end being slightly elastic whereby said hub can be forced over said outer end onto rotational mounting on said axle portion and be retained between said flange and said edge, a guide integrally molded with said flat portion and extending rearwardly from said edge proximate said pinion gear, and a flexible plastic pulling band defining teeth, said band being insert able between said guide and said pinion gear into meshing engagement with said pinion gear whereby said propeller is spun and said toy is driven by rapidly pulling said band from said engagement.

2.. A toy according to claim 1, wherein: said toy is a racing car, said flat portion defines a silhouette of a racing car, rotatable wheels are mounted on said car, and said propeller is mounted at the rear of said car.

3. A toy according to claim 1, wherein: said toy is a rocket, said flat portion defines a silhouette of said rocket, and said propeller is mounted at the rear of said rocket.

4. A toy according to claim 1, wherein: said toy is a boat, said body portion includes a boat hull, said flat portion is a vane carried atop said hull at the rear of said boat, and said propeller is mounted at the rear of said boat.

5. A toy according to claim 1, wherein: said flat portion defines a silhouette of a butterfly and said propeller is at the front of said butterfly.

6. A toy according to claim 1, wherein: said toy is a helicopter and said flat portion defines a silhouette of a helicopter.

7. A toy according to claim 1, wherein: said axle stub is of a slightly tough plastic and said end is a slotted cone in which the divided portions of said said cone can be pressed inwardly towards each other to permit said hub to be forced over said outer end after which said divided portions will spring outwardly to a normal position to retain said hub on said cylindrical axle portion.

8. A toy racing car comprising: a one-piece substantially flat body molded of tough slightly resilient plastic and defining a silhouette of a racing car and having a rear edge; axles fixed to said fiat body; wheels rotatably carried by said axles; an axle stub molded integrally with said body and including a cylindrical portion extending rearwardly from said edge and terminating in a slotted cone defining a flange having a diameter greater than the diameter of said cylindrical portion, said stub including a strengthening rib portion extending forwardly of said edge to thereby make the proximate portion of said flat body more rigid; a guide molded integrally with said flat body extending rearwardly from said edge parallel to and proximate said axle stub, said guide having a semi-circular cross-section to thereby define a friction-reducing line of contact; a fan unit rotatably mounted on said axle stub between said rear edge and said flange comprising a tubular hub and propeller blades extending outwardly from said hub, said hub having an inner diameter less than said flange but greater than said cylindrical portion whereby said hub can be pressed over said slotted cone upon pressing the divided portions of said cone inwardly towards each other, said hub having an inner portion of reduced outer diameter defining an annular flange and pinion teeth between said annular flange and said rear edge; and a plastic, slightly flexible, rack having a handle at its outer end; said rack being insertable between said rear edge of said body and said annular flange, and between said pinion teeth and said line of contact of said guide, into meshing engagement with said pinion teeth, whereby 9 upon rapidly pulling said rack outwardly across said pinion teeth by means of its handle while being held in said meshing engagement by said rear edge, said annular flange, and said guide, said fan unit is rapidly spun whereupon said toy racing car can roll forwardly on its wheels While propelled by said spinning fan unit.

References Cited by the Examiner Hojnowski 4675 Honeyrnan 74140 Fishburne 4675 X Weil 46-75 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain. Great Britain. Great Britain. Great Britain.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

LOUIS J. BOVASSO, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3381422 *Sep 16, 1965May 7, 1968Irvin E. OlsonRotatable roof structure
US3628285 *Nov 20, 1969Dec 21, 1971Murakami MasahiroGyroscopic top device
US3698129 *Jan 24, 1972Oct 17, 1972Lemelson Jerome HToy vehicles
US3704540 *Aug 24, 1970Dec 5, 1972Olympic Overseas IncHelicopter with rotor having metal ring for flywheel effect
US3732645 *Mar 31, 1971May 15, 1973Winston EFriction drive toy
US3815911 *Feb 3, 1972Jun 11, 1974Ideal Toy CorpRacing tops
US4400908 *Mar 29, 1982Aug 30, 1983Yoshiro NomuraMiniature vehicle action toy
US4526554 *Feb 10, 1982Jul 2, 1985Adolph E. GoldfarbToy motorcycle and launcher apparatus
US4571212 *May 14, 1984Feb 18, 1986Tomy Company, IncorporatedSpark emitting fly wheel driven vehicle
US6221409 *Aug 26, 1999Apr 24, 2001Nestec S.A.Rotatable frozen confectionary product
US7581579 *Jun 1, 2006Sep 1, 2009Hunter Douglas Industries B.V.Operating device for a window covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/38, 446/163, 446/457, 446/57
International ClassificationA63H29/06, B60V1/00, A63H29/24, A63H27/00, A63H27/14, A63H27/22, A63H29/00, A63H27/133
Cooperative ClassificationA63H29/06, A63H29/24, A63H27/14, A63H29/00
European ClassificationA63H29/06, A63H29/24, A63H27/14, A63H29/00