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Publication numberUS3229809 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1966
Filing dateAug 7, 1963
Priority dateAug 7, 1963
Publication numberUS 3229809 A, US 3229809A, US-A-3229809, US3229809 A, US3229809A
InventorsSpadaro Giorgio I
Original AssigneeSimon L Friedman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin holder
US 3229809 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. I. SPADARO Jan. 18, 1966 COIN HOLDER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 P7519.

Filed Aug. 7, 1963 II a? urllfllllllllllllfl n/ uman" United States Patent 3,229,809 COIN HOLDER Giorgio I. Spadaro, Evanston, 111., assignor to Simon L. Friedman, Chicago, Ill. Filed Aug. 7, 1963, Ser. No. 300,524 8 Claims. (Cl. 206.82)

This invention relates to a container useful for displaying and protecting valuable flat objects, particularly rare coins.

Heretofore, containers used for displaying rare coins have not been entirely satisfactory since adequate measures have not been taken to properly protect the rare and valuable coins which are being displayed. For example, it is particularly desirable that the coin be protected from adverse effects from the atmosphere so as to prevent tarnishing and other similar damaging effects on the coin.

Therefore, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a novel container useful for displaying and protecting rare coins.

It is a more specific objects of this invention to provide a coin display container which substantially prevents the ingress of air into the coin display chamber whereby adverse atmospheric effects on the coin are substantially prevented.

Furthermore, not only is it important to provide a container which adequately protects the coin, but it is also desirable that the same container be highly suitable for displaying the coin.

Therefore, it is a further object of the invention to provide a coin display container wherein the coin is viewable from both sides.

It is another object of this invention to provide a coin display chamber wherein the coin is firmly held in place within the display chamber.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a coin display container wherein the coin is not only held firmly in place, but is also centrally located within the chamber, despite the particular size or shape of the coin being displayed.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a coin identification area on the coin display container.

It is still a further object of this invention to reduce damaging and smearing of the coin-viewing windows by recessing the windows from the remainder of the container.

Further purposes and objects of this invention will appear as this specification proceeds.

Particular embodiments of the present invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a coin display container;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 3 but with the front and rear sides separated;

FIGURE 5 is a top plan view of the inside of the rear part of the coin display container;

FIGURE 6 is a top plan view of the inside of the front part of the coin display container;

FIGURE 7 is a broken perspective view of the dished terminal portion of a spring holding means;

FIGURE 8 is a top plan view of the inside of one part of an alternate coin display container;

FIGURE 9 is a top plan view of the inside of the mating part for the embodiment of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is a top plan view of the inside of one part of another alternate coin display container;

3,229,809 C Patented Jan. 18, 1966 FIGURE 11 is a top plan view of the inside of the mating part for the embodiment of FIGURE 10;

FIGURE 12 is a vertical sectional view of the container parts of FIGURES 8 and 9, While the parts are separated;

FIGURE 13 is a view, similar to FIGURE 12, except that the parts are shown together;

FIGURE 14 is a vertical sectional view of the container parts of FIGURES l0 and 11, while the parts are separated; and

FIGURE 15 is a view, similar to FIGURE 14, except that the parts are shown together.

Referring particularly to the embodiment of FIGURES 1-7, there is shown a coin display container, generally indicated by the number 10, which accomplishes all of the aforementioned objects. The container 10 includes a pair of mating parts 11 and 12, which together form a display chamber 13 particularly for flat objects, such as coins. Means, generally 15, are provided for surrounding the chamber 13 in order to substantially eliminiate or prevent the passage of air into the chamber 13. Flexible members 14a or 1417 are provided for maintaining the coins or flat objects within the chamber 13.

Generally, the mating part 11 may be considered as the front portion of the container 10 and the mating part 12 may be considered as the rear portion of the container 10.

The front portion 11 includes a front surface 20 which is slightly tapered, side walls 21 which extend rearwardly from the front surface 20, and a highly transparent window 22 centrally located on the front surface 20. It is advantageous that the window 22 be recessed below the surface 20 since this reduces scratching and smudging of the Window 22 and therefore assists in providing a clear view of the coins or other flat objects displayed within the chamber 13. Also, the front part 11 is provided with an inner end and rearwardly projecting ridge 25, which is spaced inwardly of side wall 21 and extends completely around the periphery of the chamber 13.

The rear part 12 is provided with a slightly tapered rear surface 26, side walls 27 extending frontwardly from the surface 26, and a rear Window 28 centrally located on the rear surface 26. Just as with the front window 22, the rear window 28 is recessed from the surface 26 in order to reduce smudging and damaging of the window. The side walls 27 are adapted to meet the side walls 21 of the front part 11 in order to provide a uniform exterior periphery for the container 10. Inside. of the mating part 12 is a frontwardly projecting continuous ridge 29 which extends around the periphery of the space 13 and is adapted to slidingly telescope within the ridge 25 of the front part 11.

The sliding mating of the rear part ridge 29 with the front part ridge 25 provides the means 15 which surrounds the chamber 13 and which substantially eliminates the ingress of air or moisture into the chamber 13. Advantageously, the rear pa-rt ridge 29 has the outer surface 30 at substantially the same diameter as the inner surface 31 of the front part ridge 25 in order to provide a frictionallyformed seal for the chamber 13.

Preferably, both mating parts 11 and 12 are provided with a tapered upper Wall 32 or 33 which is useful for identifying the object within the chamber 13. The upper walls 32 and 33 are adapted to receive a pressure sensitive identification strip, upon which may be written desired information concerning the coin. Furthermore, advantageously the rear port-ion 12 is provided with pin members 35 which are adapted to be aligned with holes 36 in the front portion 11 so that the front portion 11 and rear portion 12 are properly aligned. Also, since the mating parts fit tightly together, it is desirable that means be provided for readily separating the front part 11 from the rear part 12. Therefore, a projection 38 is provided 3 on the rear half 12 offset from a median plane and a similar projection 39 is provided on the front half 11 so that when assembled the projections 38 and 39 are laterally offset from each other and the parts 12 and 13 may be readily separated from each other.

Ordinarily, the mating parts 11 and 12 are constructed of the same material and may readily be made of a molded plastic material. Furthermore, the windows 22 and 28 are to be substantially transparent so that the coin :being displayed in the chamber 13 can be viewed from both sides. Also, it is desirable that the front surface 20 and the rear surface 26 of the container have a roughened surface, as would be provided by sandblasting. The roughened surface has a two-fold advantage since it provides an attractive contrast with the highly polished windows 22 and 28 whereby attention is directed to the coin displayed and secondly since any scratches or abrasions on the surfaces 20 or 26 will not be noticeable; furthermore, the valley 45 positioned between rear part ridge 29 and rear walls 27 and the valley 46 positioned between the front part ridge 25 and the front walls 21 are also roughened in order to increase the desired contrast with the windows 22 and 28.

The flexible members 14a or 14b which may be used for holding objects firmly in place within the chamber 13 are conveniently of two different types. The first type 14a is integral with the rear part 12 and extends forwardly from the inner face 40 of the window 28 towards the window 22. The members 14a are, for example, adapted to receive a large coin, such as a silver dollar, and to firmly maintain the samein position within the chamber 13. It is important that the extensions or projections 14a be somewhat flexible so that they firmly hold coins of slightly varying outside diameters. For example, a newly minted coin has a somewhat larger outside diameter than a coin of the same denomination which has been in use for a number of years. For this reason the diametral spacing of projections 14a is preferably on the periphery of the smallest coin diameter expected for a particular coin denomination so that all larger sizes of the coin denomination will be press fit between the projections 14a.

The second type 14b of flexible member is advantageously .a flat spring which is adapted to hold objects of widely varying shapes and sizes within the chamber 13. One or two spring members 1412 may be firmly positioned within the rear half 12 of the container 10 in slight- Also, the spring members 14b are well adapted to centrally locate coins within the chamber 13 when two spring members are used since substantially equal pressures may be applied to the coin by the four retaining fingers of the two springs, as shown in FIGURE 5.

Although the method of using the container of FIG- URES 1-7 should be clear from the above description, briefly, when it is desired to display a coin adapted to be held by projections 14a, such a coin is merely pushed into place between the projections. When it is desired to display a coin substantially less than the inside diameter of the chamber 13, one or two spring members 14b are inserted in place in the rear part 12 and the gripping fingers 42 are then positioned against the coin being displayed. When the coin is desirably positioned within the rear part 12, the front part 11 is aligned with the rear half 12 by inserting the pins 35 with-in the holes 36 and the mating parts are then pressed together. As the mating parts are being pressed together, the ridge 29 of the rear portion 12 telescopes inside the ridge 25 of the front half 11 so as to form -a seal 15 surrounding the chamber 13, for substantially preventing the ingress of air into the chamber 13. When it is desired to remove an object from the chamber 13, the mating parts 11 and 12 are separated from each other by pushing the projection 38 of the mating part 12 away from the projection 39 of the mating part 11.

Referring to FIGURES 8, 9, 12 and 13, an alternate coin holder 60 is illustrated. Generally, the alternate coin V holder 60 differs from the above-described container 10 only in the means provided for sealing the coin display chamber 62 and in the means used for maintaining a coin in place within the container 60. In most other features, the embodiment 60 is substantially the same as the first embodiment 10.

The container 60 includes a first part or half 64 and a second or mating part 66 which together define the display chamber 62. The chamber 62 is peripherally sealed by I cooperation between the forwardly projecting concentric ly less than semicircular alignment with the inner surface are maintained in place against a portion of the inner surface 43 by being positioned between the ribs 48 of the surface 43 and the projections 14a. The ribs 48 are integral with the inner surface 43 and project slightly therefrom. Adv-antageously, three ribs 48 are utilized in association with two projections 14a, as shown in FIGURE 5, whereby two ribs 48 oppose the pressure exerted by one projection 14a against the stressed spring member 14b. In effect, the holding force exerted by the stressed spring 14b against the projection 14a is enhanced by the tendency of ribs 48 to force the spring 14b tighter against the projection 14a.

Referring to FIGURE 7, preferably the terminal portions 50 of the fingers 42 are dished inwardly at 52 so as to provide additional gripping contact with thin coins. Also, the tapered leading edges 51 of the fingers 42 are adapted to grip the serrations on the periphery of a coin so as to provide additional gripping strength.

ridges 68 and 70 of the rear part 64 and the rearwardly projecting ridge 72 of the front part 66. The ridge 72 is adapted to be receive in the circular groove 74 formed between the concentric ridges 68 and 70 of the front part 64. Specifically, the outer cylindrical surface 76 of the ridge 72 is adapted to frictionally seal against the inner cylindrical surface 78 of the outer ridge 68, while the inner cylindrical surface 80 of the ridge 72 frictionally seals against the outer cylindrical surface 82 of the inner ridge 70. Thus, a peripheral seal is provided for the display chamber 62. v

In order to maintain a coin in place in chamber 62, the inner diameter of ridge 70 is constructed substantially equal to the diameter of a coin to be received therein. Further, in order to firmly grip a coin within the chamber 62, a plurality of small projections or strips 84 are provided, preferably equally spaced, along the inner cylindrical surface 86 of the ridge 70. The strips 84 are provided for firmly grasping a coin, and are particularly useful for firmly engaging serrations on the outer surface of a coin. In maintaining a coin within the chamber 62, the ridge or wall 70 may flex a slight degree in order to more firmly hold a coin therein.

Referring to FIGURES 10, 11, 14 and 15, there is shown another alternate embodiment 90 of a coin display container. The embodiment 90 differs from the previously described embodiments primary in the means used for sealing the coin display chamber 92 and in the means used for maintaining a coin in the chamber 92.

In order to peripherally seal the chamber 92, there is co-operation between the rearwardly projecting ridge 94, of the front or first mating part or half 96 and the frontwardly projetcing ridge 98 of the rear or second mating part 100. The ridge 94 includes a depressed inner step 101 having an edge which is adapted to abut the edge 102 of the frontwardly projecting ridge 98; in a similar manner, the ridge 98 of the rear part includes a depressed outer step 104 having an edge which is adapted to abut the edge 106 of the ridge 94. Furthermore, the inner cylindrical surface 108 of the ridge 94 is adapted to frictionally seal against the outer cylindrical surface 110 of the ridge 98. Thus, a peripheral seal is provided for the coin display chamber 92.

In order to maintain a coin in place within the chamber 92, a frontwardly projecting ridge or wall 112 is provided in the chamber 92, integral with the rear part 100; the upper surface 114 thereof is in close proximity to the inner surface or the window 116. Similar to the embodiment of FIGURES 8, 9, 12 and 13, a plurality of small strips or projections 118 are provided along the inner cylindrical surface 120 of the wall 112 so as to more firmly grip a coin. As a coin is inserted into the chamber 92 and as contact is made with the strips 118, the wall 112 may flex outwardly slightly, in order to firmly receive a coin therein. As with the second embodiment of the present invention, the inner diameter of wall 112 is adapted to substantially conform to the diameter of the coin desired to be stored therein.

It is readily seen from the foregoing description that all of the foregoing purposes and objects have been accomplished by the described container. First, coins being displayed in the container will not become readily tarnished or damaged from the atmosphere since ingress of air into the coin chamber is substantially prevented by the seal which surrounds the display chambers. Furthermore, the container is exceptionally well suited for displaying coins since both front and rear windows are substantially transparent so as to permit clear viewing of the coin in the chamber. Also, by recessing the windows, scratching and smudging of the windows are reduced so as to assist in providing a clear view of the coin. Still further, the coin is firmly held in place within the chamber by suitable means, and if desired the coin may be centrally located within the chamber, despite the particular size or shape of coin being shown.

While there has been shown and described a particular embodiment of this invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention and, therefore, it is intended in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall Within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim as new, and desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

1. An improved container for both displaying and protecting a coin and the like, said container being formed by a pair of generally flattened mating parts of plastic material, each mating part having projecting from one side thereof a peripheral side wall and a circular ridge spaced laterally inwardly of said peripheral side wall, the peripheral side walls of the pair of mating parts abutting each other along their lengths to provide a substantially uniform'exterior periphery for the container, at least one of said circular ridges on the pair of mating parts projecting beyond the plane of the edge of its associate periph eral side wall and telescoping with the other cincular ridge to define a circular coin display chamber centrally arranged on said container and laterally surrounded by valley means composed of the spaces located laterally between the mating peripheral side walls and the mating circular ridges, the said valley means serving as dead-air space means, said circular telescoping ridges frictionally engaging each other to retain the mating parts together and to effect a seal surrounding said chamber which substantially prevents ingress of air into said chamber, whereby tarnishing of said coin is substantially avoided, and means provided in said coin display chamber for engaging and securing a coin in place therein so as to prevent movement of the coin therein.

2. A device as in claim 1 wherein each mating part is constructed and arranged to define a clear transparent window that is integral with the mating part and is positioned to bound one side of the coin display chamber, which window is recessed relative to the exterior of the mating part to protect the window from scratching or smudging.

3. A device as in claim 1 including an elongated substantially flat wall defined on the exterior of at least one of the mating parts adjacent the peripheral edge of said part, said fiat wall being inclined relative to the plane of abutment of the mating parts so as to define a display surface adapted for receiving identification indicia thereon.

4. A device as in claim 1 including a tab formed on each mating part and projecting outwardly of the periphery thereof to provide means for selectively separating the mating parts.

5. A device as in claim 1 wherein the means for engaging the coin includes at least one leaf spring element removably positioned in said coin display chamber.

6. An improved container for both displaying and protecting a coin and the like, said container comprising front and rear mating parts of generally flat appearance and formed of plastic material, each mating part having projecting from one side thereof a peripheral side wall and a circular ridge spaced laterally inwardly of said peripheral side wall, the peripheral side walls of the pair of mating parts abutting each other along their lengths to provide a substantially uniform exterior periphery for the container, at least one of said circular ridges on the pair of mating parts projecting beyond the plane of the edge of its associate periphery side wall and telescoping with the other circular ridge to define a circular coin display chamber centrally arranged on said container and laterally surrounded by valley means composed of the spaces located laterally between the mating peripheral side walls and the mating circular ridges, the said valley means serving as dead-air space means, said telescoping circular ridges frictionally engaging each other to retain the mating parts together and to effect a seal surrounding said chamber which substantially prevents the ingress of air into said chamber in order to avoid tarnishing of said coin, and means including a plurality of spaced elements formed integrally on at least one of said mating parts and being positioned peripherally of a circle disposed coaxially within said coin display chamber for centrally locating a coin within said coin display chamber.

7. A device as in claim 6 including a pair of flexible spring members engaged by certain of said spaced elements for maintaining a coin in place within said chamber when said coin is of a diameter significantly less than the inner diameter of said chamber.

8. A device as in claim 6 wherein said front and rear mating parts include cooperating means which engage each other and align said front and rear parts for proper positioning, and integral outwardly projecting means are provided on the side walls of each of said parts for effecting a separation of said mating parts for opening said container for gaining access to the coin stored therein.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 478,947 7/ 1892 Ames. 2,013,485 9/1935 Bary et a1. 2,289,872 7/1942 Brinkmann 2204 X 2,389,312 11/1945 Honza 206-082 2,457,998 1/ 1949 Hayes et a1 206-083 2,484,248 10/1949 Roehrl 2204 X 2,755,954 7/ 1956 Antritter 2204 2,803,865 8/1957 Eljanian et al 2204 X 3,028,949 4/ 1962 Sohosky 206-08" FOREIGN PATENTS 1,074,246 3/1954 France.

457,262 5/ 1950 Italy.

THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

J. M. CASKIE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US478947 *Apr 13, 1892Jul 12, 1892 Field
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US2289872 *May 17, 1940Jul 14, 1942Harry A C BrinkmannMethod of forming tenpins
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US2457998 *Mar 22, 1946Jan 4, 1949Winter FrankCoin-holding device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3331497 *Oct 23, 1965Jul 18, 1967Lunsford Thomas JElectrical component package
US3367157 *Sep 9, 1966Feb 6, 1968Vernon CompanyKeyholder
US3448850 *Nov 30, 1967Jun 10, 1969Gen Numismatics CorpOrnamental coin holder
US3624832 *Feb 27, 1969Nov 30, 1971Dunn John MalcolmDisplay holder for discs
US3788464 *Jun 26, 1972Jan 29, 1974M Eng & Mfg IncHolder for disc-like objects
US3837475 *Nov 29, 1971Sep 24, 1974Bolanz GStorage device for coins and similar objects
US3844410 *Apr 30, 1973Oct 29, 1974Cook LMounting of coins in the pages of coin albums
US4010845 *Apr 28, 1975Mar 8, 1977Samuel BloomfieldCoin holder
US4114754 *Nov 29, 1976Sep 19, 1978The Boeing CompanyContainer integrated work stand
US4129211 *Sep 7, 1976Dec 12, 1978Monsanto CompanyWafer packaging system
US4171740 *Nov 3, 1978Oct 23, 1979Monsanto CompanyWafer packaging system
US4878579 *Apr 24, 1987Nov 7, 1989Robert M. PaulTamper-proof coin case
US4915214 *Oct 31, 1988Apr 10, 1990Wieder Horst KHolder for numismatic items
US5011005 *Jul 20, 1989Apr 30, 1991Amos Press, Inc.Protective coin holder
US5133451 *Apr 18, 1991Jul 28, 1992Amco Certification ServicesProtective coin holder
US7434684 *May 1, 2006Oct 14, 2008Mabra Robby LBroad head cover device
US7997789Dec 18, 2007Aug 16, 2011Smith Judd CClock for displaying collectibles
US9334094 *Apr 30, 2012May 10, 2016Patrick ZacardResealable packaging device and method for packaging collectible items
US20090154302 *Dec 18, 2007Jun 18, 2009Smith Judd CClock for displaying collectibles
US20100301105 *May 19, 2010Dec 2, 2010Mcclung Iii Guy LamonteContainer with flyer disc member
US20130067866 *Apr 30, 2012Mar 21, 2013Patrick ZacardResealable packaging device and method for packaging collectible items
CN103108566A *Sep 16, 2011May 15, 2013锡克拜控股有限公司Tamperproof case
CN103108566B *Sep 16, 2011Nov 25, 2015锡克拜控股有限公司防伪套盒
CN103518229A *Apr 13, 2012Jan 15, 2014皇家澳大利亚造币公司Coin capsule
DE3510505A1 *Mar 22, 1985Oct 2, 1986Pressstoff Mechanik R DuerrmanContainer, in particular for a coin
WO2012149593A1 *Apr 13, 2012Nov 8, 2012Royal Australian MintCoin capsule
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/.82, 220/4.21
International ClassificationA47G1/12, A47G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G1/12
European ClassificationA47G1/12