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Publication numberUS3230598 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1966
Filing dateNov 9, 1964
Priority dateMay 31, 1950
Also published asCA528962A, CA646676A, CA658540A, DE1195429B, US2715309, US3164882, US3273220, US3351993, US3429018
Publication numberUS 3230598 A, US 3230598A, US-A-3230598, US3230598 A, US3230598A
InventorsRosenstein Nathan, Abraham J Rosenstein
Original AssigneeSpunize Company Of America
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for crimping of natural and synthetic textile materials
US 3230598 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1966 N. ROSENSTEIN ETAL 3,230,598 APPARATUS FOR CRIMPING OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC TEXTILE MATERIALS Original Filed Sept. 19. 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet l Fig. 1

37 .L A I I 57 v 35o l 3 INVENTORS. NATHAN ROSENSTEIN & 49 BY ABRAHAM J. ROSENSTEIN T7 ATTORNEY5.

Jam 1966 N-. ROSENSTEIN ETAL 3,230,598

APPARATUS FOR CRIMPING OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETI C TEXTILE MATERIALS Original Filed Sept. 19. 1960 Fig. 5

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 BEFORE CRIMPING INVENTORS- NATHAN ROSENSTEIN 86 ABRAHAM J. ROSENSTEIN ATTORN EYS.

AFTER CRIMPING 25, 1966 N. ROSENSTEIN ETAL 3,230,598

APPARATUS FOR CRIMPING OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC TEXTILE MATERIALS Original Filed Sept. 19, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 63 Fla Y United States Patent 3,230,598 APPARATUS FOR CRIMPING OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC TEXTILE MATERIALS Nathan Rosenstein, West Hartford, Conn., and Abraham J. Rosenstein, New Marlboro, Mass., assignors to Spunize Company of America, Incorporated, Unionville, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Original application Sept. 19, 1960, Ser. No. 57,070, now Patent No. 3,164,882, dated Jan. 12, 1965. Divided and this application Nov. 9, 1964, Ser. No. 409,829

12 Claims. (Cl. 28-1) This application is a division of our co-pending US. application, Serial No. 57,070, filed September 19, 1960, now US. Patent No. 3,164,882 which application was in part a continuation-in-part of our then co-pending application, Serial No. 556,589, filed December 30, 1955 (now abandoned), which application was a continuat-ion-in-part of our then co-pending application, Serial No. 519,052, filed June 30, 1955 (now abandoned). This invention relates generally to the subject matter of our U.S. Patent No. 2,715,309, and is an improvement thereof. While this Patent No. 2,715,309 discloses certain apparatus and processes for crimping a plurality of continuous filament yarns that have been brought together to form a rope, it is often desirable to maintain the various yarns in a flat web-like form. However, in crimping a plurality of separate and independent continuous filament yarns in the continuous filament yarn state, it has been found that the yarns develop an electrostatic charge which results in ballooning of the individual filaments of each yarn thereof causing entangling of the same.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide means and methods for continuously processing synthetic continuous filament yarn to forma permanently fixed crimped yarn while keeping the various yarn components separate, but in a web-like form.

It is another object of the present invention to provide means for continuously dividing and leasing a plurality of continuous filament yarns while being individually cn'mped in anantielectrostatic field to prevent the entangling of the yarns.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, inwhich:

FIG. 1 is a plan view showing a device for processing synthetic continuous filament yarns according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of FIGURE 1 including a setting oven used according .to the process hereinafter described;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmental view taken on the line III-III of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged front view of a portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 shows an exaggerated somewhat enlarged view of a yarn comprising aplurality of filaments before and after it has been crimped in the apparatus of the present invention, and wherein the constituent filaments of the yarn appear substantially in overlapping and web-like form;

FIG. 7 is a detailed fragmental sectional'view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a view in perspective of a modification of the leasing and dividing device as constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fraginental view partly in section showing a detailed'portion of the crimping apparatus as constructed according to this invention and illustrated in FIG. 7.

With reference to the drawings, a plurality of separate yarns 11 are passed through a guide bar arrangement 10 which serves to maintain the yarns separate and independent and in relatively parallel relation. The yarns are then passed through a perforated guide bar 12 of a cramping device 15 which includes a bed or table 16 supported by a plurality of legs 17. The guide bar 12 is mounted on an adjustable upright 18 so that its position and location may be precisely adjusted to properly guide the yarns through the leasing and crimping device as hereinafter more fully described. Said device 15 is provided with a pair of relatively adjustable, horizontally disposed, peripherally smooth pressure rollers 26 and 27 which are mounted to shafts 28 and 29, respectively. The roller shafts are rotatively mounted in bearings 30 and 31, respectively, which in turn are secured to the framework of device 15. Shaft 29 is driven by means of a power unit 32 through a drive belt 33, interconnecting pulley 34, affixed to said shaft, and the pulley 25 afiixed to the shaft of motor 32. Said motor drives a gear 36 which in turn drives intermediary gear 36' meshed with a gear 35 driving a gear 35 aflixed to shaft 28, so as to simultaneously rotate rollers 26 and 27. Gears 35 and 36 are affixed respectively to shafts 35a and 36a journalled in suitable bearings mounted in the frame of the apparatus. With the above described gearing arrangements, roller 26 will rotate in a clockwise direction while roller 27 rotates in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 2.

It will be noted that said rollers are in tangential relation with each other on their point of contact with the yarns as shown more clearly in FIG. 4. Said rollers may be placed in face-to-face contact, but are not in actual contact because of the presence of the yarns 11 as will become apparent hereinafter. The pressure of one roller can be relatively adjusted with respect to the other by means of a springor other suitable tension regulating unit 37 which is provided with a handle 37a, a threaded shaft 37b extending through a threaded opening in bracket 37c. Roller 26 is pressure urged against roller 27 by means of a pressure spring or suitable device which presses against a' housing 37 By operating the handle, the housing 37 containing shaft 28 can be moved laterally with respect to the other shaft 29. Said unit 37 is provided in order to permit a slight yielding movement of roller 26 with respect to roller 27 as the yarns pass between them, Adjustment of the handle 37a turns the threaded shaft 37b extending through the opening in bracket 37c, thereby compressing the spring 37e which in turn presses against the housing 37 containing shaft 28. Clearance is provided for the movement of shaft 28, and only a slight movement of the roll 26 toward or away from the roll 27 is contemplated in the practice of this invention. The only adjustment that is required is the small one needed to accommodate yarns of different denier, and sufficient play has been provided in the gear train to accommodate such slight movement of the roll 26 as is contemplated. The rolls are never positioned with a distance between them greater than that necessary to accommodate the denier of the particular yarns to be crimped. The guide bar 12 which is clearly shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 has a series of perforations or holes bored therethrough. Each yarn 11 after passing through the guide bar arrangement 10 is directed through an individual hole in the guide bar 12. The yarns then pass downwardly through a novel leasing and dividing device 38 which is located directly below the guide bar 12 and above the tangential point of adjacency of rollers 26 and 27. The lease divider 38 is suitably mounted to the crimping device 15 and includes a rectangular framework comprising side members 0 39, 40 and a pair of end members, one of which 41a is clearly shown in FIG. 3. This rectangular framework supports a plurality of thin fiat sheet metal strips 42 which together define a series of slots 43 through which the individual yarns 11 pass. In the divider 38, the plates or strips 42 may be so set or adjusted with respect to each other in the framework to allow for change in size of the intermediate slots 43 to provide for different deniers of the yarns.

It is to be noted that between alternate metal strips 42, there are set filler members 43a which act as stops whereby certain of the yarns can be segregated from the others by moving some of the yarns over to either unblocked ends of the slots 43 whereas movement of other yarns in the alternate slots is impeded. In other words, the device 38 acts both as a guide for the individual yarns and also as a divider for the individual yarns so that the ends thereof may be leased at certain intervals for subsequent separation or treatment. The flat strips 42 are generally V-shaped as more clearly seen in FIGS. 2 and 4. The points of the depending V-shaped strips are aligned and directed toward the tangential line of the rollers to direct the yarns therebetween. It is seen then that by means of the guide bar arrangement 10, guide bar 12 and leasing device 38, the yarns are maintained separate and parallel with each other before they pass through the crimping rollers 26 and 27. It is, of course, noted that these rollers are elongated and of such length as to accommodate the series of parallel adjacent yarns 11. Disposed beneath the rollers is a housing 44 as more clearly seen in FIG. 4. As the yarns are drawn down between the rollers they enter the housing 44, where they are crimped and are retained in the housing in a crimped or folded condition, that is, disposed angularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the individual continuous filament yarns. The yarns thus accumulate in the housing. In lieu of the divider 38 as shown, there may be provided a-unit merely showing individual plates extending downward over one roller and of half the shape shown in FIG. as appears in FIG. 8 in which the elements 39', 41, 42 and 43' correspond to the similarly numbered elements of FIG. 5.

As the yarns pass through the crimping device 15 as above explained, the friction between the yarns and the various elements of the device over which they pass cause electrostatic charges to build up. With the yarns thus electrically charged, they tend to repel each other after passing between the rollers and thereby cause bunching and tangling. In order to prevent this, the present apparatus provides a plurality of static eliminators 45, 46 and 47, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. These eliminators are suitably mounted on the crimping device by means of supports 48. The supports are preferably made of insulating material so that the eliminators are insulated from the framework of the crimping device 15. Eliminators 45, 46 and 47 are connected to a source of electricity, not shown, and are thereby charged. Each eliminator comprises a straight, circular shaped bar having a series of projections thereon as more clearly seen in FIG. 1. It is readily understood then that with the eliminators connected to a source of electricity, an antistatic field will be set up in the area of the yarns 11. In this manner, any charge that would normally build up on the respective yarns will be drawn off leaving the yarns in an electrically neutral condition so that they will not repel each other and become entangled.

The housing 44 is open at the top thereof as shown in FIG. 7 while a front wall 50, part of which is pivoted to the housing, forms a movable portion or door 44a. A rear wall 48a of the housing 44 is fixed and has a curved recess 48b at the upper end thereof for accommodating a disc member 49 which is disposed in the area of tangential contact of said rollers 26 and 27 with the yarns. Said disc is retained in position by means of a bolt member 49a extending through the rear of bracket 56. The upper part of said front wall 50 is also provided with an annular recess 53 similar to recess 48b and is adapted to accommodate a disc 54 held in position against rollers 26 and 27 by means of a bolt or screw pin 55 mounted on bracket 56. It is to be noted that the front of bracket 56 is firmly held in position by means of a hinged locking member 57 shown in FIG. 2.

In order to keep pivotal wall 44a in relatively inclined position as shown in FIG. 7 in the housing 44, there is provided a lever arm 58 pivoted at 59 intermediate end 61 to a portion 60 of frame or table 16. The end 61 of said arm presses against said wall 44a while the other end 62 of said arm is provided with a groove adapted to retain one or more Weights 63.

As may best be seen in FIG. 9, walls 48a and 50 of the housing 44 are positioned adjacent the rolls 26 and 27 and are provided, respectively, with curved recesses 48b and 53 in their upper portions. Within the aforesaid curved recesses, 48b and 53, are positioned the discs 49 and 54, respectively, which lie adjacent the fiat surfaces of the rolls 26 and 27 at the point of which the yarns to be crimped pass therebetween, thereby preventing the aforesaid yarns from sliding out sideways between the rolls and cooperating with the aforesaid rolls to move the yarns downward into the crimping chamber or housing 44. The disc 49 is maintained in position against the aforesaid rolls by the bolt member 49a which passes through the rear of bracket 56, while the disc 54 is maintained in a similar position on the opposite side of said roll by a bolt member 55 which passes through the front portion of bracket 56.

After the yarns, having passed between the crimping rollers 26 and 27, have filled up housing 44, they press against the walls thereof, and force the front door 44a to yield against such pressure whereupon the crimped yarns then drop into box 49 or are collected in any suitable manner adjacent the crimping device, for example, as described in Us. patent to Rosenstein et al., No. 3,715,309.

The resultant, relaxed, crimped yarns are now in a web-like form in container 49 which is then moved into a setting oven 51. After the door thereof has been closed and the temperature in the oven raised to the proper setting temperature for the particular material being treated, the web-like yarns are kept in the setting oven for the length of time required by the inidvidual material being treated. The heat-setting may be accomplished by use of steam, infra-red rays, heat coils, ultrasonic or high frequency means or other suitable means. It will be noted that a setting oven is customarily used in the textile art and that there is an application of heat, pressure and moisture on the yarns or material therein. It has been found that the temperature range to be used may vary depending upon the type of yarns being treated in the setting oven. The range may be anywhere from to 350 F. or higher as required. It has been found, for example, that the desired temperature for setting one type of nylon is about 270 F. and for Saran from 180 F. to F. The length of time required for setting may vary anywhere from fifteen minutes or less to one and a half hours or more up to three hours, while the steam pressure in said oven may be varied from 30 to 50 pounds per square inch. By the aid of this setting operation the crimp is permanently formed in the continuous filament yarns. A yarn with a permanent crimp therein is shown in FIG. 6.

After the setting operation has been completed, the continuous filament yarns are then separated and wound upon bobbins ready for subsequent twisting, Winding and fabrication. The yarns may be directly placed on warp beams ready for weaving, tricot or warp knitting. It will be noted that said continuous filament yarns are in a permanently crimped condition and may be retained in single yarn form or may be made into multiple plies of spun-like yarns or manipulated into plied yarns of novelty twist.

From the foregoing description, taken in conjunction with the drawings, it will be noted that by our invention there is provided a device and process for obtaining a relatively flat web of crimped yarns which remains as such until separated. Such a web of yarns makes for greater ease in subsequent permanent crimp setting and facilitates separation and handling of the individual yarns comprising the web.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes other than those referred to above may be made, that equivalent elements may be substituted for those illustrated in the drawings, that parts may be reversed, and that certain features of the invention may be used to advantage independently of the useof other features, all within'the spirit of the invention as defined in the annexed'claims.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. A device for crimping individual continuous filament yarns comprising a pair of relatively adjustable pressure counter rotary members, means for operating said members, V-shaped means disposed above and between said rotary members to form a shed for leasing said yarns, means for directing at least one yarn between the members in a fixed line of movement, means beneath the exit portion of said members for containing said yarn against the continued influx of said yarn from the members into the means, said last named means being constructed and arranged to release said yarns therefrom in response to the pressure of said yarn contained therein, and antistatic generating means adjacent the rotary members and the exit portion of the means beneath the exit portion of said rotary members for preventing entangling of yarn.

2. Means for crimping a plurality of continuous filament yarns comprising a plurality of pressure counter rotary means, means for operating said rotary means, guide means to direct said plurality of yarns between said rotary means, said guide means including a guide bar having a plurality of holes through which the yarns separately pass, a lease divider having a plurality of slotted openings located adjacent said guide bar whereby the plurality of yarns are separately leased and directed between said rotary means, housing means adjacent the rotary means, pressure means associated with said housing means adapted to retain the yarns in said housing means to effect a crimping action on the yarns, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a limp and relaxed condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns contained in said housing means, and antistatic means for the rotary means and the pressure means to prevent bundling of the yarns during the processing.

3. Means for crimping a plurality of continuous filament yarns comprising at least two pressure exerting rotary means rotatable relatively counter to each other, means for operating said rotary means, guide means to direct said plurality of yarns between said rotary means, said guide means including a lease divider having a plurality of spaced parallel V-shaped plates set above and between the rotary means and providing a plurality of slotted openings located adjacent said rotary means whereby the plurality of yarns are leased and separately directed between said rotary means, housing means located below the rotary means for collecting the yarns, pressure means associated with said housing means adapted to retain the yarns in said housing means to effect a crimping action on the yarns, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in response to the pressure of said yarns collected therein, and antistatic means for the pres sure means and the rotary means to prevent bundling of the yarns during the processing.

4. Means for crimping a plurality of continuous, separate filament yarns comprising a plurality of pressure rotary means rotatable relatively counter to each other and having a common line of tangency, means for operating said rotary means, guide means to separately direct individual yarns between said rotary means, said guide means including a guide bar having a plurality of holes through which the yarns separately pass, a lease divider having a plurality of spaced parallel V-shaped plates forming a plurality of slotted openings, and alternate stopping block portions forming a shed for said yarns, said divider being located below said guide bar whereby the individual yarns are separately directed between said rotary means, housing means associated with the rotary means, pressure means associated with said housing means adapted to retain the individual yarns in said housing means to effect a crimping action on the yarns, and said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a relaxed, limp condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns retained in said housing means.

5. Means for crimping individual continuous filament yarns comprising a pair of rollers located adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, means for rotating said rollers relatively counter to each other, guide means located above said rollers for individually receiving yarns, means having a plurality of slotted openings located below said guide means, said slotted openings being adapted to receive the individual yarns passing through the guide means whereby the yarns are selectively separated and directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, and having a plurality of alternate stopping block portions forming a shed, housing means located below the rollers for collecting said yarns, pressure means associated with said housing means, said'housing means being adapted to release said yarns in response to the pressure of said yarns collected therein, and antistatic means for said rollers and pressure means.

6. Means for crimping a plurality of continuous filament yarns comprising a-pair of rollers located. adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, means to rotate said rollers relatively counter to each other, yarn guide means including a lease divider having a plurality of spaced parallel plates providing a plurality of slotted openings and alternate stopping block portions, said plates having pointed ends being aligned and directed toward the line of tangency of said rollers, said slots being adapted to receive individual yarns and permit leasing thereof whereby the yarns are directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, housing means located below the rollers for collecting said yarns, and pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a weblike condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns collected within said housing means.

7. Means for crimping continuous filament yarns comprising a pair of rollers, said rollers having a common line of tangency, means to rotate said rollers relatively counter to each other, yarns guide means having a plurality of aligned holes adjacent said rollers, the holes in said guide means being adapted to receive individual yarns, lease dividing means having a plurality of spaced, parallel plates providing a plurality of slotted openings located below the guide means, said slotted openings being adapted to receive the individual yarns passing through the guide means and permit leasing thereof whereby the individual yarns are directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof to be squeezed therebetween, housing means located adjacent said rollers for collecting said yarns, pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in response to the pressure of said yarns collected therein, and antistatic means adjacent the rollers to prevent entangling of the individual yarns.

8. Means for crimping individual continuous filament yarns comprising a pair of counter rotatable rollers located adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, filament yarn guide means including lease dividing means having spaced slotted openings located above said rollers, said slotted openings being alternately provided with stopping blocks, said openings being adapted to receive individual yarns whereby the yarns are directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, housing means located at the rollers for collecting said yarns, pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a limp and relaxed condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns contained in said housing means, and means to prevent entangling of said yarns, said last named means comprising a plurality of electrically charged electrodes located adjacent said rollers and said guide means whereby an antielectrostatic field in provided to prevent the individual yarns from acquiring an electric charge.

9. In a device for crimping a plurality of individual continuous filament yarns, a pair of rollers located adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, means for rotating said rollers relatively counter to each other, yarn guide means including a plurality of spacers located above said rollers, the spacers in said guide means being adapted to individually receive a plurality of yarns, a lease divider having a plurality of slotted openings and stopping blocks located below said guide means forming a shed for leasing said yarns, said slotted openings being adapted to receive the individual yarns passing through the guide means whereby the plurality of yarns are directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, housing means located adjacent said rollers for collecting said yarns, pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a crimped, relaxed, limp condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns contained in said housing means, and means to prevent entangling of said yarns, said last named means comprising a plurality of electrically charged electrodes located adjacent said rollers and said guide means whereby an antielectrostatic field is provided to prevent the yarns from acquiring an electric charge.

10. Means for crimping a plurality of individual continuous filament yarns comprising a pair of rollers located adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, means for rotating said rollers relatively counter to each other, yarn guide means including a lease divider having a plurality of spaced parallel generally V-shaped plates providing a plurality of slotted openings with alternate stopping block portions to permit formation of a shed for leasing said yarns, the points of said V-shaped plates being aligned and directed toward the line of tangency of said rollers, said slotted openings being adapted to receive the individual yarns whereby the yarns are directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, crimping housing means located below the rollers, pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a limp, relaxed, crimped and web-like condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns contained within said housing means, and means to prevent entangling of said yarns, said last named means comprising a plurality of electrically charged electrodes located adjacent said rollers'and said guide means whereby an antielectrostatic field is provided to prevent the yarns from retaining an electric charge.

11. Means for crimping a plurality of individual, continuous filament yarns comprising a pair of rollers located adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, means for rotating said rollers relatively counter to each other, yarn guide means including a lease divider having a plurality of spaced parallel plates with alternately arranged stopping blocks at the terminal portions of said divider to permit formation of a shed for leasing said yarns, and providing a plurality of slotted openings, said slotted openings being adapted to receive the individual yarns whereby the yarns are leased and directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, crimping housing means located below the rollers, pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in response to the pressure of said yarns collected therein, and means to prevent entangling of said yarns.

12. Means for continuously crimping a plurality of individual continuous filament yarns in the form of a web comprising a pair of horizontally disposed rollers located adjacent each other and having a common line of tangency, means to rotate said rollers relatively counter to each other, yarn guide bar means located at said rollers, said guide bar means being adapted to individually receive a plurality of yarns, a lease divider having a plurality of spaced parallel plates with alternate blocked ends to permit formation of a shed for leasing said yarns, and providing a plurality of slots located below said guide bar means, said slots being disposed above and intermediate the rollers and being further adapted to receive the individual yarns passing through the guide bar means whereby the individual yarns may be leased and directed between said rollers at the line of tangency thereof, housing means located adjacent said rollers for forming with the rollers a crimp in the yarns, pressure means associated with said housing means, said housing means being adapted to release said yarns in a limp, relaxed, crimped and web-like condition whenever the pressure exerted by said pressure means is overcome by the pressure of said yarns contained in said housing means, and means to prevent entangling of said yarns.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,154,127 9/1915 Rasehorn et al.

2,181,777 11/1939 Asbelle 19-157 2,311,174 2/1943 Hitt 19--66 2,394,165 2/1946 Getaz 1966 2,420,035 5/ 1947 Fairbairn 19--65 2,502,129 3/ 1950 Brabander 19-66 2,793,418 5/1957 Pfau 1966 X DONALD W. PARKER, Primary Examiner.

ROBERT R. MACKEY, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1154127 *Jan 15, 1913Sep 21, 1915Siemens AgApparatus for neutralizing electric charges in fibrous materials.
US2181777 *Jul 26, 1937Nov 28, 1939Asbelle Julius ArthurSplit drawing
US2311174 *Dec 6, 1940Feb 16, 1943Du PontTextile crinkler
US2394165 *Apr 23, 1943Feb 5, 1946Louis Getaz JamesProcessing of synthetic fibers
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US2502129 *Jul 29, 1944Mar 28, 1950American Viscose CorpMethod of treating filamentary materials
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7309461 *Apr 12, 2004Dec 18, 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Ultrasonic crimping of a varied diameter vascular graft
US20120013036 *Feb 18, 2010Jan 19, 2012Rhodia Acetow GmbhMethod for Producing Multiple Fibre Strips in Parallel and Apparatus for Executing Said Method
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/268, 28/269, 19/66.00R
International ClassificationD02G1/12, G01R33/07, B65H57/16, D01G1/10
Cooperative ClassificationG01R33/07, D01G1/10, B65H2701/31, B65H57/16, D02G1/12
European ClassificationB65H57/16, D02G1/12, G01R33/07, D01G1/10