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Publication numberUS3230734 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1966
Filing dateJul 25, 1963
Priority dateJul 25, 1963
Publication numberUS 3230734 A, US 3230734A, US-A-3230734, US3230734 A, US3230734A
InventorsAlan J Koch
Original AssigneeWhirlpool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Unitary wall member for use in refrigeration apparatus
US 3230734 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 25, 1966 A. J. KOCH UNITARY WALL MEMBER FOR USE IN REFRIGERATION APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 25, 1963 Jan. 25, 1966 A. J. KOCH UNITARY WALL MEMBER FOR USE IN REFRIGERATION APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 25, 1963 Jan. 25, 1966 KOCH 3,230,734

UNI'IARY WALL MEMBER FOR USE IN REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Filed July 25, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 l m /i 45 /5 V 7 g9 3- United States Patent 3,230,734 UNITARY WALL MEMBER FOR USE IN REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Alan J. Koch, Evansville, Ind., assignor to Whirlpool Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed July 25, 1963, Ser. No. 297,545 6 Claims. (Cl. 62-298) This invention relates to refrigeration apparatus, and in particular to refrigerated structures.

One well known form of refrigerated cabinet structure comprises a combination refrigerator-freezer apparatus wherein a cabinet is provided defining a refrigerator chamber and a freezer chamber. It has been desirable to provide a single refrigeration unit for cooling the respective chambers to the desired refrigerating and freezing temperatures, and to this end, a substantial number of different refrigeration systems have been devised. One such attempt to solve this problem has been the drawer or air conditioner type refrigeration system wherein a separate insulated housing was provided to house the evaporator. The known structures have not proven completely satisfactory because of the substantial cost thereof and the difficulties and resulting high cost in providing duct means for delivering the refrigerated air to and from the chambers.

The present invention comprehends an improved'refrigeration apparatus wherein a central refrigeration unit is provided in a novel and simple manner. Thus, a principal feature of the present invention is the provision of a new and improved refrigeration apparatus.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of such refrigeration apparatus having new and improved means for providing refrigerated air to a plurality of chambers to be refrigerated.

A further feature of the invention is the provision of such a refrigeration apparatus including means defining a chamber to be refrigerated, the chamber having a wall portion, an evaporator, a blower, and an insulating wall member insulating the wall portion of the chamber means and defining an evaporator space receiving the evaporator, a blower space receiving the blower, and duct means for conducting air from the blower to the chamber and from the chamber through the evaporator to the blower.

Still another feature of the invention is the provision of such refrigeration apparatus wherein the Wall member is formed of a foamed plastic material.

A yet further feature of the invention is the provision of such refrigeration apparatus wherein the insulating wall member further defines a condenser space and duct means for conducting air from the blower to the condenser space.

Yet another feature of the invention is the provision of such refrigeration apparatus wherein the wall member further defines a compressor space and duct means for conducting air from the blower means to the compressor space.

A further feature of the invention is the provision of such refrigeration apparatus wherein the blower means comprises a pair of blowers and a single drive motor carried in a dividing wall between the spaces in which the blowers are disposed.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of a refrigeration apparatus having improved air circulating means providing for facilitated servicing and interchangeability between diiferent refrigeration models.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a rear elevation of a refrigeration apparatus embodying the invention with portions thereof broken away to facilitate illustration thereof;

3,239,734 Patented Jan. 25, 1966 FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary vertical section taken sub-' stantially along the line 5-5 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary vertical section taken substantially along the line 66 of FIGURE 2; and

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary vertical section taken substantially along the line 77 of FIGURE 2.

In the exemplary embodiment of the invention as disclosed in the drawing, a refrigeration apparatus generally designated 10 is shown to comprise a cabinet 11 having a top wall 12, a left side wall 13, and a right side wall 14. The cabinet includes an upper liner 15 which may be formed of a suitable material, such as a plastic, and defining a freezer space 16. A second liner 17 similarly formed of a suitable material such as a plastic is disposed in the cabinet below the freezer space 16 to define a refrigeration space 18. The liners 15 and 17 are insulated by means of an insulating Wall member generally designated 1-9, herein comprising a foamed in place, or molded, plastic wall member.

The invention comprehends a novel arrangement of the wall member 19 permitting the installation of the refrigeration unit generally designated 2% therein and providing for the circulation of the refrigerated air to the freezer and refrigerator chambers. More specifically, as best seen in FIGURE 7, the wall member 19 defines an evaporator space 21 wherein is disposed an evaporator 22. The wall member 19, as shown in FIGURE 4, further defines a first blower space 23, and as shown in FIGURE 6, defines a second blower space 24. As shown in FIGURE 7, the wall member 19 still further defines a condenser space 25, and as shown in FIGURE 6, defines a duct 27 for returning air from the condenser space to the blower space 24. Still further, as shown in FIGURE 4, the Wall member 19 defines a first duct 28 for delivering refrigerated air from the blower chamber 23 through a first inlet passage 29 to the freezer chamber 16, and a second inlet 30 to the refrigerator chamber 18. As shown in FIGURE 5, the wall member 19 further defines a second duct 31 cooperating with a first outlet 32 from freezer chamber 16 and a second outlet 33 from refrigerator chamber 18 to return the air from the freezer and refrigerator chambers to the evaporator space 21. i

As best seen in FIGURES 4 through 7, the rear of the evaporator space 21 and first blower space 23 is closed by an access panel 35 which may be similarly formed of foam molded plastic.

An excellent example of an evaporator suitable for use as evaporator 22 is that disclosed and claimed in copending United States application Serial No. 264,280, filed March 11, 1963, to which reference may be had for specific details of construction thereof. Briefly, how ever, the evaporator 22 includes an outer tubular housing 37 and an inner, tubular evaporator sheet 38 defining therebetween an air flow passage 39. A small diameter accumulator tube 40 inwardly defines an axial refrigerant passage 41 and outwardly defines with evaporator sheet 38 an annular air flow passage 42. A- fin structure 43 extends across passage 42 in serpentine fashion to provide improved heat transfer between the evaporator sheet 38 and accumulator tube 40 and the air flowing through the passage 42. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 1, air is passed longitudinally through the evaporator 22 to the first blower chamber 23. A first blower 44 is disposed within the chamber 23 for circulating the air from the evaporator 22 through duct 28 to the freezer chamber 16 and refrigerator chamber 18, as best seen in FIG- URE 4. As indicated briefly above, the air is then returned to the evaporator chamber 21 through duct 31, as shown in FIGURE 5.

As shown in FIGURE 1, a drain 45 extends from the lower end of the cylindrical evaporator space 21 and is inclined downwardly to the left as shown therein. During a defrosting operation, the melt is delivered from the evaporator space 21 through the drain 45 into a pan 46 defining the bottom of the compressor space 34.

The blower 44 is driven by suitable means such as an electric motor 47 which is mounted in a dividing wall 48 between blower spaces 23 and 24, respectively. As shown in FIGURE 1, the blower 44 is mounted on a shaft 49 extending through the dividing wall 43 from the motor 47. A fan 50 is disposed within a suitable shroud 51 defining one wall of the second blower space 24 and is driven from motor 47 by a suitable shaft 52 to draw the air from blower space 24 and deliver air to the compressor space 3 as shown in FIGURE 1. Wall 48 comprises an insulating wall which may be formed integrally with the wall member 19 for maintaining the two air streams circulated by the respective lower 44 and fan 50 thermally independent of each other.

The refrigeration unit 20 further includes a convenventional compressor 53 in space 34 above collecting pan 46. The compressor is connected in conventional fashion by means of a suitable conduit 54 to the accumulator 40 of the evaporator 22 and by suitable conduit means 55 to a serpentine tube condenser coil 56 disposed within condenser space 25. The condenser coil 56 is in turn connected to the evaporator 22 by a suitable interconnecting conduit 57. Still further, the compressor 53 is connected to a precooler conduit 58 extending vertically upwardly from the compressor in a direct space 59 which leads to the fan shroud 51. As shown in FIG- URE 1, air is circulated by means of fan 50 upwardly through condenser space 25 to the top of the wall member 19, and then downwardly through the space 59 to the blower space 24 for delivery to the compressor space 34. The heat developed by the compressor and condenser during its operation serves to evaporate the collected melt in pan 46 and the resultant water vapor is then discharged from the compressor space 34 with the air passed by fan 50 through space 34 to externally of the cabinet.

As shown in FIGURE 3, the condenser coil 56 is carried on a metal panel sheet 60 which defines the outer.

rear wall member of the cabinet. As shown in FIG- URES 4 through 7, the sheet 60 extends in facial engagement with the rear surface of the wall member 19. The lower end 61 of sheet 60 terminates slightly below the level of the refrigerator chamber 18 permitting installation of the access panel 35 therebelow to rearwardly close the evaporator space 21 and blower space 23. The rear of the compressor and condenser space 24 is closed by an access panel 60a. The sheets 60 and 60a may be secured to the side walls of the cabinet by suitable means such as screws 62, as shown in FIGURE 1.

As shown in FIGURE 5, the access panel is arranged to define an inlet 63 to the evaporator space 21 communicating with the duct 31. As further shown in FIG- URE 4, the access panel 35 is arranged to define an outlet 64 from the blower space 23 to the duct 28.

Thus, the refrigeration apparatus comprises an improved structure wherein the rear wall including wall member 19, panel 60a, and sheet 60 defines a plurality of spaces for respectively housing the evaporator, air moving means, condenser, and compressor means of the apparatus. The wall member 19 may be formed in a simple manner by being foamed in place, whereby substantial economy of construction is effected. The use of the wall member permits standardization of the refrigeration unit for readily interchangeable use with refrigerators having different refrigeration chamber arrangements. Further, the wall member 19 provides for facilitated assembly and improved compact arrangement of the refrigeration unit. The wall member provides improved defrosting efiiciency as a result of the improved remote insulated disposition of the evaporator. Still further, the invention provides for facilitated servicing of the refrigeration unit. Further, improved heat transfer and air distribution efficiency is provided.

While I have shown and described one embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. In a refrigeration apparatus; an evaporator; blower means; a condenser; means defining a chamber to be refrigerated including an insulating wall member formed of a single piece of insulating material and defining (a) an evaporator space receiving said evaporator, (b) a blower space receiving said blower means, (0) a condenser space receiving said condenser, (d) duct means defined substantially fully by said insulating material for conducting air from said blower to said chamber and from said chamber through said evaporator to said blower, and (e) an access opening to said evaporator and blower spaces; and panel means removably closing said access opening.

.2. The refrigeration apparatus of claim 1 wherein said duct means is further arranged to conduct air from said condenser space to said blower.

3. In a refrigeration apparatus; an evaporator; blower means; a compressor; means defining a chamber to be refrigerated including an insulating wall member formed of a single piece of insulating material, said wall member including an outer sheet element and defining (a) an evaporator space receiving said evaporator, (b) a blower space receiving said blower, (c) a compressor space receiving said compressor, (d) duct means defined substantially fully by said insulating material for conducting air from said blower to saidv chamber and from said chamber through said evaporator to said blower, and (e) an access opening to said evaporator and blower spaces; and panel means removably closing said access opening.

4. The refrigerationv apparatus of claim 3 wherein said duct means is further arranged to conduct air from said blower means to said compressor space.

5. In a refrigeration apparatus; an evaporator; a first blower; a second blower; a condenser; means defining a chamber to be refrigerated including an insulating wall member formed of a single piece'of insulating material and defining (a) an evaporator space receiving said evaporator, (b) a first blower space receiving said first blower, (c) a second blower space receiving said second blower, (d) a dividing wall separating the two blower spaces, (e) first duct means defined substantially fully by said insulating material for conducting air from the first blower to said chamber and from said chamber through said evaporator to said first blower, (f) second duct means. defined substantially fully by said insulating material for conducting air from said second blower to said condenser, and (g) an access opening to said evaporator and first blower space; and panel means removably closing said access opening.

6. The refrigeration apparatus of claim 5 wherein a drive motor is mounted in said dividing wall and is References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Jones 62-450 X Hill 62-450 X Bixler 62-283 Corhanidis 62-448 X Reverman 62-450 X Mann et a1 62-419 X Devery 62-450 X Preotle et a1. 62-419 X Jacobs 62-419 Mann et a1 62-283 Kesling 62-465 Gelbard 62-419 X Harle 62-283 ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2576665 *Dec 8, 1949Nov 27, 1951Gen ElectricAir circulating arrangement for refrigerators
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3433031 *Nov 8, 1967Mar 18, 1969Whirlpool CoRemovable unitary refrigeration system
US3524329 *Oct 28, 1968Aug 18, 1970Gen Motors CorpRefrigerant condenser with key connector
US3736768 *Jun 29, 1971Jun 5, 1973Westinghouse Electric CorpMachine compartment arrangement for a refrigerating device
US4490990 *Dec 29, 1983Jan 1, 1985General Electric CompanyHigh-side refrigeration system assembly adapted to be mounted in a refrigerator machinery compartment
US4917256 *Jul 12, 1988Apr 17, 1990Whirlpool CorporationInterlocking and sealing arrangement for modular domestic appliances
US5428973 *Nov 13, 1992Jul 4, 1995Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaRefrigerator with meandering air duct for wire and tube condenser
WO2003062721A1 *Jan 21, 2003Jul 31, 2003BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHInner wall for a refrigerator housing
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/298, 62/450, 62/277, 62/444, 62/291, 62/455
International ClassificationF25D17/06, F25D23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/003, F25D17/065, F25D2317/0683, F25D2400/04
European ClassificationF25D17/06A1, F25D23/00B