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Publication numberUS3231924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1966
Filing dateDec 27, 1963
Priority dateDec 27, 1963
Publication numberUS 3231924 A, US 3231924A, US-A-3231924, US3231924 A, US3231924A
InventorsLofgren Charles W
Original AssigneeSanford Res Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marking device
US 3231924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb- 1, 1956 c. w. LoFGRl-:N 3,231,924

MARKING DEVICE Filed Dec. 27, 1963 INVENTOR.

United States Patent O 3,231,924 MARKING DEVICE Charles W. Lofgren, Oak Park, Ill., assignor to Sanford Research Company, Bellwood, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed Dec. 27, 1963, Ser. N o. 333,827 Claims. (Cl. 15-563) The present invention relates to a novel marking or coloring device, and more specifically a novel device of the type including a container for a quantity of marking or coloringfluid and a marking element or a wick extending from the container through an opening for applying the iiuid to a desired surface.

Marking devices of the type contemplated herein generally inclurle a wick-like marking element formed from felt or other self-supporting absorbent material and disposed so as to extend through an opening in a bottle or container. While certain of the heretofore proposed structures have functioned generally satisfactorily, ditiiculties have been encountered in assembling the parts of prior devices and in securing the marking or wick-like element in a manner promoting the free flow of huid from the Wick-like element while at the same time assuring proper contact between the wick-like element and the marking fluid or marking iiuid retaining means within the container. r

An important object of the present invention is to provide a novel marking device of the above described type which is constructed so as to enable the marking or wick element to be retained securely and in a predetermined manner while promoting. the free flow of marking Huid through the wick-like element. l

A more specific object of the present invention is to provide a novel marking element of the above described type having a body of absorbent material for retaining marking fluid Within a container, which device is coustructed for facilitating assembly of a marking or wicklike element with the container and for securely retaining the Wick-like element in firm engagement with the body of absorbent materialfor promoting transfer of fluid from the absorbent material to the wick-like element.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel marking device of the above described type which may be manufactured and assembled quickly and economically.

Still another important object of the present invention is to provide a novel marking device of the above described type having a container and closure therefor constructed for providing a releasable seal therebetween in a manner which permits the closure or cap to be repeatedly removed and replaced and which substantially pre` cludes evaporation of the marking uid when the closure or cap is assembled with the container.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings wherein:`

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view showing a marking device incorporating features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a view showing theV marking device with the cap or closure removed and positioned for accomplishing a marking operation.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical cross sectional view of a marking device incorporating `features of the present invention;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are fragmentary sectional views respectively showing successive steps in a method of assembling the marking or wick-like element with the container of the device;

FIG. 6 is a further enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing structural features in greater detail;`

Ace

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along line 77 in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along line 8 8 in FIG. 3.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, wherein like parts are designated by the same numerals throughout the various figures, a marking device 10 incorporating features of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 and comprises a container 12 and a removable closure or cap 14.

The container 12 is of one-piece seamless construction and is formed from metal which is extruded to provide a cylindrical body 16 and a transverse bottom wall 18. A body of absorbent material Ztl is disposed within the cylinder 16 for retaining a quantity of marking fluid or ink. A wick-like marking element 22 formed from felt or other suitable self-supporting absorbent material is disposed with the lower end thereof in iinm engagement with the body 20 of absorbent material and an opposite end thereof extending above the upper end of the container. Thus when the cap 14 is removed, the marking device may be used for applying ink or coloring fluid to a workpiece in the manner shown in FIG. 2.

After the body 20 of absorbent material is inserted into the cylinder 16 during the assembly of the marking device, an upper end portion of the cylinder is reduced in diameter to provide an elongated generally cylindrical neck section 24 joined to the remainder of the cylindrical body by a tapering section 26. The internal diameter of the neck section 24 is similar to a major transverse dimension of the wick or marking element 22. As shown best in FIGS. 7 and 8, the wick or marking element 22 preferably has a generally rectangular cross sectional configuration which is such that the wick element substantially traverses the neck section 24 in one direction While leaving air passageways 28 and 30 at opposite sides of the wick.

In order to insure proper operation of the marking device, it is desired that the Wick or marking element 22 be retained in rm engagement with the body 20 of absorbent material whereby to promote free transfer of ink or marking fluid from the body 20 to the wick-like marking element. At the same time, the wick-like element must be secured in a manner which leaves the passageways 28 and 30 substantially open so that during dispensing of the ink or marking fluid air can enter the container for equalizing the air pressure and promoting the free flow of lluid. In accordance with a feature of the present invention the container 12 is formed for securing the wick or marking element 22 firmly against the body 20 of absorbent material and so as to leave the air passages open. In addition the construction is such that the wick-like element may be secured rapidly and economically.

As shown best in FIG. 4, the neck like section 24 of the container is initially formed so that it is of substantially uniform diameter and so that an outer side and end surface 32 is bevelled for providing a relatively sharp terminal edge 34. After the neck section 24 has been formed in this manner, the wick-like element 122 is inserted through the neck portion so that a lower end 36 of the wick-like element which is preferably pointed is pressed against and at least partially embedded in the body 20 of absorbent material. Then the upper end of the neck section 24 is axially engaged and swaged by a die 38.

The die 38 which may be mounted on and actuated by any suitable punch press apparatus or the like comprises an elongated tubular section 40 having an internal diameter closely similar to but slightly greater than the external diameter of the neck section 24 as shown in FIGS.

` 4 and 5. The tubular section 40 merges with a bore 42 which provides clearance for the wick-like marking element and an annular tapering surface 44 is formed at the junction between the sections 40 and 42. The surface 44 is inclined at an angle of about thirty degrees with respect to the longitudinal axis of the die and is formed with a rounded or concave configuration.

When the die 38 is moved from the position shown in FIG. 4 into ingagement with the neck section as shown in FIG. 5, the curved annular surface 44 initially engages the upper terminal edge 34 and the bevel surface 32 of the neck section and causes the upper end portion of the neck section to curl inwardly as shown in FIG. 5 and also as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6 for providing an annular inturned ilange 46. It will be observed that a free marginal portion of the flange 46 projects substantially in a plane generally perpendicular to the axis of the wick-like or marking element 22 and the sharp terminal edge 34 is substantially embedded in the opposite narrow edges of the wick-like element. This construction assures positive and secure anchoring of the wick-like element 22 against longitudinal movement whereby a wick-like element is maintained in aggressive engagement with the body of absorbent material.

It is further important to note that when the upper end of the neck section 24 is swaged and curled, the previously mentioned clearance between the dies section 4t) and the neck enables an annular portion 48 of the neck section immediately adjacent the llange 46 to be deflected radially outwardly. In other words, the annular portion 4S is formed to provide an annular bead around the neck section which bead is substantially located at the extreme upper end of the neck section. This bead aids in securing the cap member and providing a seal in the manner described below.

The cap member 14 is formed from a tough resilient material and is preferably formed from a plastic such as polyethylene or nylon. The cap member includes elongated central generally cylindrical portion 50 having an internal diameter substantially the same as the external diameter of the neck section 24 and less than the external diameter of the annular bead 48. The cylindrical section 50 of the cap has a length suillcient to provide clearance for the upper end of the wick or marking element 22 and a transverse wall 52 is formed integral with the cap body 50 for closing the upper end thereof. A plurality of longitudinally extending and radially projecting ribs 54 are formed integral with the cap body 50 and extend substantially throughout the length thereof for facilitating holding and turning of the cap member and for reinforcing the body 50.

When the cap is assembled with the container as shown best in FIGS. 3 and 6, the body 50 closely surrounds the neck section 24 and rmly engages the annular bead 48. Since the diameter of the bead 48 is greater than the normal internal diameter of the cap body 50, the cap body is resiliently deformed around the annular bead and is continuously and aggressively urged against the bead for providing an air-tight seal. It is to be noted that this seal is located substantially at the extreme upper end of the neck section so as to minimize the volume of the air chamber within the cap and minimize any tendency of the ink or coloring lluid to evaporate. Furthermore it has been found that there is a tendency for the ink or coloring tluid which has evaporated into the air chamber in the cap to condense on the exposed outer wall of the neck section and the aforementioned location of the seal between the bead 48 and the cap prevents any of the evaporated lluid from condensing on the radial sides of the neck section. In other words, any of the fluid which may condense on the container will be located on the exposed axially facing surface of the end flange 46. This feature not only minimizes loss of the ink or marking fluid, but also maintains the neck section in a clean condition so as to minimize any possibility of the 4. ink or marking fluid staining the hands of a person using the device.

While the resiliency of the plastic or other material from which the cap 14 is formed causes the cap to engage the bead 48 aggressively, the bead 48 will cause a complementary groove 56 to be impressed in the wall of the cap body member 50. The groove 56 and bead 48 provide a mechanical interlock between the cap and the container 12 which positively prevents the cap from being accidentally loosened from the container. It has been found that this construction substantially prevents the cap from being removed merely with a straight axial pull and generally requires rotation of the cap relative to a container as well as an axial pull on the cap in order to remove the cap from the container.

While the preferred embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described herein, it is obvious that many structural details may be changed without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A marking device comprising: a container including a body portion and an elongated tubular metal neck section having predetermined internal and external diameters; a 'body of fluid retaining material in said body portion; an elongated wick-like marking element having predetermined major and minor transverse dimensions and extending through said neck portion, said marking element having an inner end in engagement with said marking lluid retaining material and an outer end projecting vbeyond said neck section, said neck section including a substantially continuous annular inturned flange presenting an inwardly facing annular terminal edge having a diameter substantially less than said major dimension and greater than said minor dimension, said edge being embedded in opposite edges of said wick-like element, said neck section including an axially limited annular radially outwardly projecting bead immediately adjacent to and merging directly with said flange, said bead having a maximum diameter greater than said predetermined exterior diameter of said neck section; and a cap comprising a tubular body of resilient material removably telescoped over said neck section, said tubular cap body having an internal diameter similar to said external diameter of said neck section and less than said maximum diameter of said bead and sealingly engaging said `bead immediately adja-cent said flange.

2. A marking device comprising: a one piece extruded metal seamless container comprising a cylindrical body portion having a relatively large diameter and a reduced elongated tubular neck section having predetermined internal and external diameters; a body of marking iluid absorbing and retaining material in said body portion; an elongated wick-like marking element having a generally rectangular transverse cross-sectional configuration and predetermined major and minor transverse dimensions, said major transverse dimension being similar to said predetermined internal diameter 'of said neck section, said minor dimension being substantially less than said predetermined internal diameter, said marking element having an inner end in engagement with said marking fluid retaining material and an outer end projecting beyond said neck section, said neck section including a substantially continuous annular inturned tlange presenting an inwardly facing annular terminal edge having a diameter substantially less than said major dimension and greater than said minor dimension, said edge being embedded in opposite edges of said wick-like element, said neck section comprising an axially limited, radially outwardly projecting annular bead immediately adjacent to and merging directly with said flange and having a maximum diameter slightly greater than the external diameter of said neck section; and a cap member removably telescoped over and sealingly engaging said neck section, said cap member being formed of resilient material and having an internal diameter similar to the external diameter of said neck section and less than said maximum diameter of said bead `whereby to sealingly engage said bead.

3. A marking device, as defined in claim 2, wherein said cap comprises a substantially cylindrical internal surface and annular groove means in said surface to matably receive said Ibead.

4. A marking device, as dened in clai-m 3, wherein said cap is molded in one piece from tough resilient plas- -tic material and the exterior of which comprises a plu- -rality of .circumferentially spaced axially extending and radially outwardly projecting ribs.

5. A marking device comprising: a container including a body portion and an elongated tubular metal neck `section having predetermined internal and external diameters; a body of fluid retaining material in said body portion; an elongated wick-like marking element having predetermined major and minor transverse dimensions and extending through said neck portion, said marking element having an inner end in engagement with said marking iluid retaining material and an outer end projecting beyond said neck section, said neck section including a substantially continuous annular inturned iiange presenting an inwardly facing annular terminal edge having a diameter substantially less than said major dimension Vand greater than said minor dimension, said edge Ibeing embedded in opposite edges of said wick-like element, said neck section including an axially limited annular radially outwardly projecting bead immediately adjacent to and merging directly with said flange, said bead having a maximum diameter greater than said predetermined exterior diameter of said neck section; and a cap comprising a tu'bular body of resilient material removably telescoped over said neck section, said tubular cap body having an internal diameter similar to said external diameter of said neck section and less than said maximum diameter of said bead and sealingly engaging said bead immediately adjacent said flange, said tubular cap body having a bore whose length is sufliciently greater than the exposed portion of said marking element to pass a substantial surface ybeyond said bead when said cap is tted onto said container in closing relationship therewith.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2713176 *Apr 22, 1953Jul 19, 1955Rosenthal Sidney NMarking device
US3089182 *Feb 11, 1960May 14, 1963Sanford Corp Of LiberiaMarking device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3814526 *Sep 13, 1971Jun 4, 1974Gillette CoSabotage-proof marking instruments and elements therefor
US4466452 *Dec 20, 1982Aug 21, 1984Del Laboratories, Inc.Fingernail treatment arrangement
US4666709 *Jan 17, 1986May 19, 1987A.W.Faber-Castell Gmbh & Co.Nail coating material and device for applying the same
US5074455 *Oct 9, 1990Dec 24, 1991Motorola, Inc.Solder flux dispenser suitable for use in automated manufacturing
US5154193 *Mar 13, 1989Oct 13, 1992Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AktienContinuous hair dye dispensing device
US5743959 *Nov 26, 1996Apr 28, 1998Libbey-Owens Ford Co.Reusable applicator tip
US5909978 *Nov 15, 1993Jun 8, 1999Porex Surgical Inc.Marker pen
US5964226 *Sep 12, 1997Oct 12, 1999Sobel; Joan LaskerHair product application system
US6010263 *Sep 22, 1997Jan 4, 2000Henkel CorporationApplicator for flowable materials
US6322269 *Feb 4, 2000Nov 27, 2001Sanford I L.P.Free ink system
US6632041Aug 9, 2001Oct 14, 2003Sanford L.P.Free ink system
US6695517Mar 26, 2002Feb 24, 2004Sanford, L.P.Free ink system
US7101104Dec 8, 2003Sep 5, 2006Sanford, L.P.Free ink system
US8915662 *Mar 15, 2013Dec 23, 2014Michael KildevaeldMarking blade
US9039315 *Mar 12, 2013May 26, 2015Junior's Bullet Pen CompanyWriting apparatus
US20040170465 *Dec 8, 2003Sep 2, 2004Wolfgang WitzFree ink system
US20130333232 *Mar 15, 2013Dec 19, 2013Michael KildevaeldMarking blade
US20140270893 *Mar 12, 2013Sep 18, 2014Junior's Bullet Pen CompanyWriting Apparatus
WO2001066267A1 *Mar 9, 2001Sep 13, 2001James MichaelInstruments for producing edible colored indicia on food substrates and medicaments
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/198, 29/511, 29/516
International ClassificationB43K8/06, B43K23/00, B43K23/12, B43K8/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43K8/06, B43K23/12
European ClassificationB43K8/06, B43K23/12