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Publication numberUS3232004 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1966
Filing dateJan 15, 1963
Priority dateJan 15, 1963
Publication numberUS 3232004 A, US 3232004A, US-A-3232004, US3232004 A, US3232004A
InventorsWilliam Felsher
Original AssigneeWilliam Felsher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical flashing and sounding toys
US 3232004 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 1, 1966 w. FELSHER 3,232,004

ELECTRICAL FLASHING AND SOUNDING TOYS Filed Jan. 15, 1963 Bzl K Wi ma.

ATTORNE United States Patent O 3,232,004 ELECTRICAL FLASHING AND SOUNDING TOYS William Felsher, 8512 Fayette St., Philadelphia, Pa. Filed Jan. 15, 1963, Ser. No. 251,645 8 Claims. (Cl. 46-227) trolling such outward manifestation of circuit energization as sound and light. Applications which are most obvious include the simulation of an animal heart beat, pseudoscientific toys such as Geiger counters, dosimeters, radio and radar apparatus, mine detectors and the like wherein it is desirable to have a combined periodic audible and visual signals. In fact, so universal are the applications of the instant invention that all embodiments shown and discussed herein are to be treated only as exemplary thereof.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a toy wherein, automatically, lights are flashed and a sounder is activated with predetermined periodicity.

Another object of the invention is to provide a toy which produces periodic sounding and flashing in response to the proximity of a magnetic field of force.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a doll which flashes its eyes and emits a realistic heart beat with a predetermined periodicity.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a circuit wherein a light producing means also acts as a time delay switch which is normally closed.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an action-initiator comprising a permanent magnet which will cause a magnetically responsive toy to emit both light flashes and sound when in proximity to said initiator.

Other objects of the invention are to provide flashing and sounding toys, the periodicity of which is predetermined and automatically regulated, which are easily and V economically produced, sturdy in construction, highly efiicient in operation, long-lived and made of readily available inexpensive non-sophisticated components.

These and other related objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the toy making art from a consideration of the following detailed description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 represents a perspective view, partially in phantom of a doll embodying the invention.

FIGURE 2 represents a side view of the head of the doll shown in FIGURE 1, partially in section.

FIGURE 3 represents an action-initiator, in the form of a toy stethoscope, which may be used in conjunction with the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG- URE 1.

FIGURE 4 represents a section through a telegraphtype sounder useful in connection withthe invention.

FIGURE 5 represents an incandescent flasher filament bulb which, in connection with the invention, serves as a normally-closed automatic time delay switch.

FIGURE 6 is a section through a normally open magnetically-responsive switch useful in connection with the invention.

FIGURE 7 is a section showing the switch of FIG- 23 is connected to the other.

ICC

initiator, which is also shown.

FIGURE 8 is an elevation of another magneticallyresponsive switch useful in connection with the invention, shown in open position.

FIGURE 9 shows the switch of FIGURE 8 in closed position under the influence of an action-initiator, which is also shown.

FIGURE 10 represents a generic circuit diagram embodying the invention.

Referring now the drawings, wherein like numerals designate like parts and referring particularly to FIGURE 10, the circuit diagram, it will be observed that the invention comprises a series circuit including an on-otf switch A, an incandescent flasher filament bulb B having a normally-closed bi-metallic strip, a direct-current signal means C and a battery D. Various embodiments of the invention may also use an action-initiator E for causing switch A to close. Such an initiator is illustrated in FIG- URE 3.

Essential to an understanding of the invention is a consideration of the incandescent flasher filament bulb shown in FIGURE 5 and, accordingly, this component will be discussed first. This bulb is not to be confused with neon globe lamps or similar gaseous tubes which do not flash and through which current does not flow unless and until a predetermined firing voltage, often as high as volts DC, is reached. This bulb is a normally-closed bulb which lights when normal battery voltages are applied. Such bulbs comprise a bare 20, an evacuated glass envelope 21 within which is a filament 22, and a bi-rnetallic strip 23. As is well known in the art, the base includes a portion 24, insulated from the rest of the base, which serves as one polarized connection whereas the outside wall of the base itself serves as the other polarized connection. The filament is connected to one of these polarized connections whereas the bi-metallic strip The base may also be provided with a lug 25 which is used in connection with bayonet type sockets. In the normally-closed position, strip 23 is in contact with filament 22 and, thus, as soon as voltage is applied across the bulb contacts the filament is energized and the lamp lights. Heat from the filament causes the bi-metallic strip 23 to bend away from the filament and, as shown in FIGURE 5, the lamp goes out. As the bi-metallic strip 23 cools, it bends back to its original, normally-closed position wherein it is touching the filament 22 and the lamp again lights. This cooling and heating cycle is repeated and keeps the light flashing. Such bulbs are described in the Miniature Lamp Bulletin No. 3-9027 published by the General Electric Co. of Schenectady, New York. The bulbs can be supplied to give a predetermined number of flashes per minute varying from 50 to and may be supplied to operate on a wide variety of conventional dry cell batteries including, for instance, AA, C, D, and F cells.

A direct-current operated signal means C, suitable for use in the invention, is shown in FIGURE 4. This particular signal means is a telegraph-type sounder which comprises an electromagnet 26, which is wired into the circuit shown in FIGURE 10 using leads 27 and 28. The electromagnet may be provided with a pole piece 2? and is mounted on a non-conductive bracket 30. The bracket also serves to support a spring-arm 31, a spacer 32, and a spring-stop 33. Mounted on spring-arm 31, in proximity to pole piece 29, is a paramagnetic plate 34 On the other side of spring-arm 31 is resiliently mounted a striker as sembly 35. As shown in FIGURE 4, the sounder is de-energized and plate 34 and pole piece 39 are spaced apart. When current flows through the electromagnet 26, plate 34 and along with it spring-arm 31 is drawn into sound-making contact with pole piece 29 to produce a distinct audible click. No further action will result while the electromagnet is energized. However, upon de-energization of the electromagnet plate 34, which has no inherent magnetism, will no longer be held to piece 29 and spring-arm 31 will thus be released. The energy stored therein will cause it to fly upward so that striker 35 will hit springstop 33 to produce a second audible indication or click. Obviously, the device can be modified so that it produces sound only on energization of the electromagnet.

Having considered the nature of the incandescent flasher filament bulb and the direct-current operated signal means it will now be possible, in conjunction with FI URE 10, to appreciate the potential of the instant invention before proceeding to discuss a few of the more obvious embodiments of it.

FIGURE represents a series circuit of the invention comprising an on-ofi" switch A, which may be any of a wide variety of single-pole, single-throw switches as well as switches of the type which will be described hereinafter. Switch A is connected by lead 36 to the bi-metallic strip 23 of bulb B. Filament 22 of bulb B is connected, by lead 28, to an electromagnet 26 and lead 27 connects the other side of the electromagnet to battery D. Finally, a lead 37 completes the circuit by connecting battery D to the other side of switch A. On closure of switch A, bulb B will light and, simultaneously, signal means C will emit a sound. When bi-metallic strip 23 bends away from filament 22, the circuit is opened, coil 26 is deenergized, and the sounder C again operates.

When a circuit of the type shown in FIGURE 10 is employed using a bulb B which flashes 100 times per minute and a double sounding means of the type shown in FIGURE 4, the action will produce 100 flashes per minute and 100 double soundings per minute as well. These double soundings, which may be termed strike and rebound, bear a strong resemblance to the systolic and diastolic beats of the heart. Further, the rate of beating is of the same order of magnitude as that of the human heart. Accordingly, one obvious utilization of the device is to simulate a human heart beat and such an embodiment is shown in FIGURES l and 2.

Considering these figures, it will be noted that the invention comprises a doll, generally 40, which includes eyes 41 behind which is a comomn eye cavity 42. Within the eye cavity 42 is mounted, as with socket 43, a flasher bulb B. Thus light from bulb B will be visible through both eyes 41. As shown in FIGURE 1, the doll also includes a normal heart area 44 delineated, if desired, by a heart shaped marking on the dolls body or garment. Positioned in proximity to the heart are a switch A and a sound producing device C. The doll also contains a battery D. As indicated in FIGURE 1 the leads and wiring are as shown in the circuit diagram of FIGURE 10. Switch A may be of a manually-operated on-off type, in which case there will be a continuous heart beat and flashing of the eyes as long as the switch is closed. However, an interesting variation of the invention may be obtained when switch A is a normally-open magnetically-responsive switch which closes in response to lines of magnetic force emanating, for instance, from the action-initiator shown in FIGURE 3.

In FIGURE 3 the initiator is embodied in a toy stethoscope. As shown therein the stethoscope comprises ear tubes 45 and a head 46 which includes a permanent magnet portion 47. When such an initiator is placed in proximity to the heart area 44 the magnetically responsive switch A closes to energize the circuit and cause the heartsimulating action to begin. This action ceases when the head 46 is withdrawn.

FIGURES 6 and 7 illustrate a magnetically-responsive switch suitable for use in the invention. This switch is encapsulated in a glass envelope 43 which permits ease of mounting within the toy figure and also protects the blades from mechanical damage and corrosion. Resilient conductive blades 49 and 50 are provided which are kept in insulated normally spaced-apart relationship by internal plugs 51 and 52 which may be made, for instance, of a ceramic material. One or both of these blades may be made of paramagnetic material. Further, both blades may be made of magnetic material and oppositely polarized. Such polarization tends to keep the blades in spaced-apart relationship and yet, the field emanating from an action-initiator E when it is in proximity to the switch, as shown in FIGURE 7, overcomes the fields of the blades and allows them to come into contact with each other.

In FIGURE 6 the switch is shown in open position and in FIGURE 7, under the influence of action initiator E, the blades are in contact and a circuit exists between leads 36 and 37. Other suitable normally-open magnetically responsive switches for use in the invention are described in the 196l62 E.E.M. Catalogue, published by Tee Publishers Inc. of Hempstead, N.Y., on page 1462 thereof. Thus, the switch described and shown in the figures is merely exemplary.

FIGURES 8 and 9 illustrate another suitable magnetically-responsive switch. This switch comprises a first spring blade 53, preferably made of paramagnetic material and a second blade 54, preferably made of electrically conductive non-magnetic material such as copper. These blades may be held in place in a toy by a peened stud 55 made of non-magnetic non-conductive material and a spacer sleeve 56, also made of non-conductive material, may be used to keep the blade in spaced-apart relationship.

As shown in FIGURE 9, under the influence of actioninitiator E, blades 53 and 54 are in contact thus completing a circuit between leads 36 and 37. Thus it is seen that the action-initiator, in the form of a stethoscope, bears a natural relationship to the doll from which the heart beat-simulating sound emanates. Alternatively, the functions of each may be reversed and area 44 may be defined by a magnet with the entirety of the circuit contained in the stethoscope.

Although the invention has been described in considerable detail, such description is intended to be illustrative rather than limiting, since the invention may be variously embodied and its extent, consequently, is to be determined by the appended claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A toy comprising an electrical oscillator series circuit, producing both audible and visual signals, which series circuit includes: (a) a battery; (b) a normally-open magnetically-activated switch adapted to be closed by a magnetic field of force; (0) an incandescent flasher filament bulb having a normally-closed bi-metallic strip in series with its filament which opens after the filament heats and closes after the filament cools; and (d) an electro-magnetic sounding device which both upon energization and de-energization causes sound making juxtaposition of magnetic and non-magnetic portions thereof; closure of said switch causing said bulb to light and said sounder to emit a sound; subsequent heating of said filament causing said series circuit to be de-energized and said sounder to emit another sound, the cycle of intermittent sounding and illumination continuing until said switch is opened.

2. The toy of claim 1 wherein, further, said switch comprises a first resilient blade connected to one side of said circuit, a second resilient blade connected to the other side of said circuit, means for keeping said blades in normally spaced-apart and electrically-insulated relationship; permitting a field of magnetic force to cause said blades to make electrical contact and complete said circuit.

3. The toy of claim 2 wherein one of said blades is made of paramagnetic material and the other blade is made of non-magnetic electrically-conductive material.

4. The toy of claim 2 wherein both of said blades are made of magnetic material and are oppositely polarized.

5. In a toy having a normal heart area and eyes, an electrical oscillator series circuit producing both audible signals from the heart area and visual signals from the eye area which series circuit includes: (a) a battery; (b) a normally-open magnetically-activated switch adapted to be closed by a magnetic field offorce which switch is located proximate said heart area; (c) an incandescent flasher filament bulb positioned proximate the eyes, having a normaly-closed bi-metallic strip in series with its filament which opens after the filament heats and closes after the filament cools; and ,(d) an electro-magnetic sounding device, positioned proximate the normal heart area, which both upon energization and de-energization causes heartbeat simulating sound making juxtaposition of magnetic and non-magnetic portions thereof; closure of said switch causing said bulb to light the eyes and said sounder to emit a sound reminescent of a systolic heartbeat; subsequent heating of the filament causing said series circuit to be de-energized and said sounder to emit another sound reminiscent of a diastolic heartbeat; the cycle of intermittent heartbeat simulating sound and eye illumination continuing until said switch is opened.

6. The device of claim 5 which further includes, in combination, action-initiator means for closing said switch, said means comprising a permanent magnet.

7. The device of claim 6 wherein said action-initiator means is in the form of a stethoscope with said permanent magnet concealed in its head, said magnet creating a field of magnetic force sufiiciently strong to close said magnetically-activated switch When said action-initiator means is proximate said switch.

8. A toy comprising an electrical oscillator series circuit producing both audible and visual signals, which series circuit includes (a) a battery; (b) a normally-open magnetically-activated switch adapted to be closed by a magnetic field of force; (c) an incandescent flasher fila- References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,749,663 6/1956 Lemelson 46236 2,933,853 4/1960 Laval 46-228 2,957,273 10/1960 Hughes et a1 46227 3,024,568 3/1962 Barnett 46232 3,119,200 1/1964 Curtin et a1 46232 DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2749663 *May 16, 1955Jun 12, 1956Lemelson Jerome HToy mine detector
US2933853 *Aug 30, 1956Apr 26, 1960Laval Jr Claude CToy figure
US2957273 *Oct 17, 1958Oct 25, 1960Hughes Elbert LAmusement device
US3024568 *Mar 9, 1960Mar 13, 1962Barnett Harry EToy stethoscope with electronically simulated heartbeat
US3119200 *Mar 10, 1961Jan 28, 1964Curtin William JPulsing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3361902 *Jun 1, 1965Jan 2, 1968Arthur E. CardenasOrnament combining audio and visual effects
US3422566 *Mar 29, 1965Jan 21, 1969Wolf TobinMiniature ringing and talking telephone
US3531890 *Feb 8, 1968Oct 6, 1970Mattel IncSwitch means for controlling an animation device in a figure toy
US3531891 *Mar 18, 1968Oct 6, 1970Mattel IncSwitch means for controlling an animation device in a figure toy
US3691680 *Dec 30, 1971Sep 19, 1972Katzman Allison WIlluminated figure toy
US3846934 *Mar 1, 1973Nov 12, 1974Ideal Toy CorpKissing doll actuated by pressure applied to lips
US3867786 *Sep 27, 1973Feb 25, 1975Tseng PeterMagnetically-controlled animated toy
US4075782 *Nov 25, 1975Feb 28, 1978Neuschatz Joseph JDoll showing sickness, and means for "curing"
US4155196 *May 12, 1977May 22, 1979General Mills Fun Group, Inc.Play method and apparatus for producing a heartbeat-like sound
US4166337 *Jul 7, 1977Sep 4, 1979Horsman Dolls Inc.Doll with heartbeat simulator
US4237647 *Jan 11, 1979Dec 9, 1980Maurice ShawSoft toy containing sounding device
US4307539 *Jan 30, 1980Dec 29, 1981Klein Claus DieterToy simulating a physician's instrument
US4601668 *May 15, 1985Jul 22, 1986Vladimir SirotaDoll heart monitoring toy
US4605380 *Mar 13, 1985Aug 12, 1986Samuel A. CammHeartbeat doll
US4938730 *Jun 9, 1988Jul 3, 1990Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Toy house with magnetically actuated light
US5092811 *Sep 19, 1990Mar 3, 1992Irwin Toy LimitedMechanism for the crying and sucking motion of dolls
US5190492 *Aug 27, 1991Mar 2, 1993Berenguer Juan JMechanism for dolls allowing sucking movement
US5603652 *Jun 22, 1995Feb 18, 1997Rothschild; OmriDoll assembly
US6623326Dec 19, 2001Sep 23, 2003Hasbro, Inc.Sound-effects generating device with bipolar magnetic switching for activity devices
US6937152Apr 8, 2003Aug 30, 2005Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcWireless interactive doll-houses and playsets therefor
DE2927593A1 *Jul 7, 1979Aug 14, 1980Klein Claus Dieter Dipl WirtscSpielzeugdoktorgeraetezusammenstellung
DE4302572A1 *Jan 29, 1993Aug 4, 1994Scharrer & Koch SigikidEye operating arrangement for eg. teddy bear
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/130, 40/455
International ClassificationA63H3/00, A63H3/28
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/28, A63H3/006, A63H3/001
European ClassificationA63H3/28, A63H3/00B, A63H3/00E