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Publication numberUS3232370 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1966
Filing dateJun 2, 1964
Priority dateJun 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3232370 A, US 3232370A, US-A-3232370, US3232370 A, US3232370A
InventorsChristopher Jaffe John
Original AssigneeStagecraft Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-facet portable acoustic panel structure
US 3232370 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 1, 1966 J. c. JAFFE 3,232,370

MULTI-FACET PORTABLE ACOUSTIC PANEL STRUCTURE Filed June 2, 1964 FIG. I. u x

' l MW 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR J. CHRISTOPHER JAFF'E ATTORNEYS.

Feb. 1, 1966 3,232,370

J- C. JAFFE MULTI-FACET PORTABLE ACOUSTIC PANEL STRUCTURE Filed June 2, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 6.

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39 36 39 INVENTOR J. CHRISTOPHER JAFFE 39 u/Wu, flwva ,Q/WJWQIO,

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Feb. 1, 1966 J. c. JAFFE MULTI-FACET PORTABLE ACOUSTIC PANEL- STRUCTURE Filed June 2, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4- INVENTOR J. CHRISTOPHER JAFFE m /lawn FIG. II.

AT TORNEVS.

United States Patent 3,232,370 MULTI-FACET PORTABLE ACOUSTIC PANEL STRUCTURE John Christopher Jaife, Norwalk, Conn., assignor to Stagecraft Corporation, Norwalk, Conm, a corporation of New York Filed June 2, 1964, Ser. No. 371,925 13 Claims. (Cl. 18130) This invention relates to an acoustical shell and, more particularly, to a novel modular portable acoustical shell construction comprising multi-facet acoustical panels having sections whichlie in different planes.

- Portable or removable acoustical shell structures are used to improve the sound-reflecting acoustical properties of armories, gymnasiums, and similar types of large rooms which have inherently poor acoustical properties for instrumental or vocal concert purposes, as well as being used for outdoor performances of the same type.

Thus, for example, one known construction involves a series ,of substantially vertical panels which must be mounted and braced in upright positions and a second series of ceiling panels which must be suitably supported by an overhead structure or the like. Obviously, a construction of this type is cumbersome and time consuming to erect. Additionally, and of more importance, the transportation of the panels which comprise the shell from one point to another is unnecessarily expensive since the panels must be trucked from place to place and they take up a large amount of storage space.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a portable acoustic shell comprising a plurality of multifacet panels which can be folded to take up a minimum amount of space when transporting same and which unfolds to provide an efiicient acoustical structure which improves the acoustical properties of a room.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a portable acoustic shell structure which is simple to erect, easy to handle and is relatively inexpensive to produce.

In accordance with the present invention, an acoustic shell construction is provided comprising a plurality of multi-facet relatively rigid panels of sound-reflecting material arranged to be secured together in substantially abutting juxtaposed relation to form the shell, the assembled shell and the individual panels being supported upon stands which allow the overall height of the individual panel constructions to be varied.

A particular feature of the invention is the acoustical construction of each panel. Thus, each panel includes a first or lower portion comprising a first pair of substantially identical segments which are hinged to one another along adjacent or inner side edges. Means are provided on the rear of the panels, connected to the outer side edges of the segments to connect the sections to maintain the panels in a position wherein the panels taper outwardly rearwardly from the hinged connection. The panels further comprise a second or upper portion comprising a second pair of substantially identical segments which are similarly hinged together along adjacent inner side edges. The respective top and bottom edges of the first and second portions which comprise the panel are provided with cooperating hinge locks which receive removable hinge pins so the top portion may be releasably secured to the bottom portion. The top edge of the lower pair of segments taper outwardly upwardly from the inner side edges and the bottom edges of the upper pair of sections taper outwardly downwardly from the inner side edges; the respective top and bottom edges of the portions being formed complementary to one another so, in the assembled condition, the top segments will likewise taper outwardly and rearwardly and will respectively fiberglass. and rigidly connected to aluminum support frames. In

3,232,370 Patented Feb. 1 1966 overhang the segments of the lower section to form respective obtuse angles therewith. Thus, each segment will lie in a different plane when the panel is assembled.

The segment surfaces are of a suitable sound-reflecting material, such as, for example, polyester resin-reinforced These fiberglass panels may be individually the preferred embodiment, the outermost side-s of the supporting frame form hollow tubes having an aperture in the bottom thereof which is adapted to receive a leg of the supporting structure. Two transverse apertures are provided in these sides of the frames and releasably receive a pin therein which is adapted to be received on the respective legs to mount the lower portion of the acoustic panel in upright position on the legs. The legs may be connected to castered bases and suitable reinforcing members between the base and the leg may be provided to add an overall structural rigidity to the particular panel. The shell is formed by placing a number of these panels in juxtaposed relation and securing these together along the outer side edges. When it is desired to store or transport the acoustic shell, the panels are separated and the upper and lower portions of each panel are taken apart and the segments of the respective portions are foldedover the associated segment to form a compact unit which is approximately the size of the overall panel unit when assembled. The individual portions may be laid on top of one another to conserve space. As a subsidiary feature, the legs and castered bases may be separated to facilitate storage of the supporting structure.

It is a feature of the present invention to provide a multi-facet portable acoustic shell construction comprising a plurality of panels wherein each segment of a panel lies in a different plane.

It is a further feature of this invention to provide a multi-facet portable acoustic shell structure wherein the panels which comprise the shell may be disassembled and folded to a size which is approximately 4 the size of the overall unit when it is assembled.

It is another feature of this invention to provide a plurality of multi-facet panels, each having interlocking means along their outermost side edges so a number of such panels may be connected together to form the portable acoustic shell construction.

Still another feature of the present invention is to provide a multi-facet portable acoustic panel structure whose height can be very easily varied in accordance with the acoustical properties desired.

The above and other objects and features of the present invention will become more apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view, as viewed from the right, of an acoustical shell embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a front perspective view, as viewed from the left, of a single panel unit comprising the acoustical shell of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top elevational view of a single panel unit;

FIG. 4 is a top elevational view of a single panel unit when disassembled;

FIG. 5 is an exploded front elevational view of a panel preparatory to assembly;

FIG. 6 is a rear elevational view of a first embodiment of the top portion of the panel preparatory to assembly;

FIG. 7 is a rear elevational view of the bottom portion of the panel in assembled condition;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the of the panel;

FIG. 9 is a front elevational view of a second ernbodiment of the top section of a panel preparatory to assembly;

bottom section 1010 in FIGS. 6 and 7 of the connection between the frames;

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of a panel unit construct ed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken along the lines 12-12 in FIG. 11;

FIG; 13 is a cross-sectional view taken along the lines 13 13 in FIG. 11; and

FIG. 14 is an enlarged detail view of the hinge locks aiid pins connection of the present invention.

FIG. 1 illustrates an acoustical shell 10 made up of a plurality of separate panel units 21 comprising the panels 20 embodying the invention and secured together at adjacent side edges in upright juxtaposed relation. Each panel 20 is supported by a base structure 11 which maintains the panels in the upright position.

1 In a preferred embodiment, the individual panels 20 comprises an upper section 30 and a lower section 40 (FIG. Lower section 40 comprises a pair of segments 40a and 40b of sound-reflecting material such as a polyester resin reinforced Fiberglas. As shown in FIG. 7, panels 40a and 4012 are connected to suitable frames 41 and 42, respectively, adjacent their peripheral edges by any conventional means such as rivets 42, to maintain the segments taut over the area defined by the frame. Hence, the shape of the segments conform to the shape of the frame. In the preferred embodiment frames 41 and 42 will be made of extruded aluminum tubular members so the overall expense of the shell will be kept at a minimum and the complete structure will be lightweight. Gusset plates 43 may be provided at the corners of each frame to reinforce the frame and add a structural rigidity to the overall lower section 40. Gusset plates 43 may be connected to the respective frame by rivets or any other conventional means.

FIG. illustrates in detail the connection between the gusset plates, the sound-reinforcing segments, and the tubular aluminum frame; it being understood that each portion of'the frame is similarly connected to the respective acoustical panel segment and gusset plate. Member 42a of tubular frame 42 comprises a longitudinally extending outer wall 45a and laterally extending rear and front walls 45b and 450, respectively, which are parallel to one another and are connected at their remote ends by inner wall 45d which is parallel to wall 45a. Wall 45a is provided with an extended portion which forms downturned flanges 45c and 45 which are respectively spaced from and parallel to laterally extending walls 45b and 450 to form receiving channels. Gusset plate 43 is received within the channel defined by flange 45c and Wall 4512 in abutting relation to the connection between wall 45a and flange 45a and is secured in place by rivet 44. Acoustical panel segment 40B is similarly received within the space defined by flange 45f and wall 45c in abutment with the extension between rear wall 45a and flange 45 and is similarly affixed in place by a rivet 44. This type of reinforcing construction contributes to the strength of the entire structural arrangement of the present innvention. In the preferred embodiment, all panel segments are connected to the respective tubular frame in a similar manner.

The outer wall of adjacent side members 42a and 41a of the respective frames 42 and 41 are connected together by hinges 46'adjacent the top and bottom members of the frame. As shown in FIG. 10, plate 46a of hinge 46 is connected to wall 45a of member 42:; by rivet 44 and plate 46b is similarly connected to member 41a by a rivet 44. Thus, segment 404 may be folded over and superposed on segment 40b to form a compact unit, as illustrated in FIG. 4, when the panels are disassembled and stored. Additionally, the extent that the segments may be rotated or opened away from each other will be limited since the outer walls of members 41a and 42a will abut each other.

The respective top members 4112 and 42b of respective frames 41 and 42 tap'er upwardly outwardly from the hinged members for reasons which will be set out hereinbelow. Side members 410 and 420 of the respective tubular frames 41 and 42 are provided with the hinge locks 47 which cooperate with complementary placed hinge locks 011 adjacent panels to receive the hinge pins 48 to securely lock adjacent panel units together in juxtaposed relation to form acoustical shell 10.

Eye bolt 12 (FIG. 7) extends through member 41c and is secured thereto by any conventional means such as a nut. A cable 13 is connected to eye-bolt 12 in any conventional manner and, at its other end, is connected to. a turnbuckle 14. A second eye-bolt 15, which is located in the same plane as bolt 12, is similarly connected to the tubular member 420 and is adapted to receive the hook end of the turnbuckle, as noted below.

In a first embodiment, upper section 30 of panel 20 comprises segments 30a and 30b of sound-reflecting material which are respectively connected to the tubular frames 31 and 32 adjacent their peripheral edge, so the: sound-reflecting surfaces 30a and 30b assume the contours of the respectively associated frames, by any conventional means such as rivets 34. Gusset plates 33 are connected to each frame at the corners thereof to reinforce and strengthen the tubular frame. Side members 31a and 32a of respective frames 31 and 32 are hinged together by the hinges 36 which are spaced from the respec'tive upper and lower members of the frame in the same manner as lower section was connected. Thus, surface 30a may be folded over and superposed on surface 30b when the upper section is disassembled to take up a minimum of space as shown in FIG. 4, thereby facilitating storage and transportation of the unit. Similar to section 40, the opening of separation of segments 30a and 30b will be limited by the abutting of members 3101 and 32a.

The bottom members 31b and 32b of the respective tubular frames 31 and 32 taper outwardly, downwardly from the hingedly connected side member 31a and 32a for the reasons noted below. Moreover, the side mernbers 31 and 320 of frames 31 and 32 taper upwardly inwardly toward the hinged members from bottom to top. Members 3112 and 32b are provided with hinge locks 39 spaced from each end and are formed comple mentary to the hinge lock 49 on the top edge of members 41b and 32b of section 40 so the respective locks 39 and 4% may be aligned with each other and hinge pin: 48 inserted therethrough to releasably secure upper section 30 to lower section 40.

Base structure 11 (FIGS. 11 and 12) comprises a horizontally projecting tubular bar 16 provided with downturned portions at each end which are adapted to receive the respective shafts of casters 17 therein in the well known manner so the panel units will be movable when assembled. Strap 18 may be welded to bar 16 adjacent one end thereof and is in the shape of a U as viewed from the front with the bight of the U engaging the undersurface of bar 16, aligned apertures 19 are provided in the legs of strap 18 adjacent the end thereof. Supporting strut 22 is pivotally connected to bar 16 at the downturned end adjacent strap 18 by such means; as, for example, a screw and wing nut so strut '22 may be tightened in place. beg 23 is connected to bar 16 and supports panel 20 thereon. Thus, tubular leg 23" is provided with an aperture 24 adjacent the bottom thereof. This aperture is adapted to be aligned with aperture 19 in strap 18 so a bolt 25 may pass therethrough to receive wing nut 26 on the end thereof which may be tightened in place to secure leg 23 to horizontal bar 16. A second aperture 27, which is spaced approximately one-third of the length of leg 23 from the bottom end thereof, isadapted to be aligned with a cor-- responding aperture (not shown) in the "top of strut 22 see screw or bolt may be passed through aperture 2'1 5. and the aperture in strut 22 and aflixed in place by a wing nut which engages the threaded end of the bolt to form a rigid base structure. It is noted that the axis of aperture 27 is transversed to the axis of aperture 24. The top of leg 23 is provided with a slot 28 for reasons which will become apparent.

Tubular members 41c and 420 of lower portion 40 are provided with bores at the bottom thereof (not shown) which are adapted to receive respective legs 23 therethrough from the respective base structures 11 with leg 23 projecting vertically within the interior of hollow members 410, 42c (FIG. 13). Apertures 50a and 51a provided through tubular member 410 in a direction transverse to the axis of member 41c and are respectively aligned with similarly placed apertures 50b and 51b in tubular member 42c. These apertures are spaced from one another in a vertical direction and are spaced from the bottom edge of respective frames 41 and 42 for a reason which will become apparent hereinbelow.

Assembling the unit During transportation or storage of a panel unit, the segments of the respective upper and lower portions will be superimposed on each other in the manner illustrated in FIG. 4 while the base structure 11 will be disassembled as similarly shown in FIG. 4, it being understood that a second basic structure is provided. When it is desired to erect the multi-facet panel of the present invention, the segments 40:: and 40b of lower section 40 are unfolded and turnbuckle 14 is connected to eyebolt 28. The length of cable 13 is such that segments 40a and 40b cannot be opened to lie in the same plane but must form a V-shape as viewed from above with segments 40a and 40b tapering outwardly rearwardly from hinged members 41a and 42a. Turnbuckle 14 may be adjusted in the conventional manner to vary the degree of taper within limits. That is, the length of the cable and turnbuckle is less than the total longitudinal length of the two segments but greater than the longitudinal length measured from 41c to 42c when members 41a and 42 are abutting one another.

' Upper section 30 may then be opened and placed upon lower section 40 with the holes in adjacent hinge locks 39 and 49 in alignment. Hinge pins 48 may then be inserted through the respective hinge locks to secure upper portion 30 to lower portion 40. Due to the taper of the respective upper and lower tubular members of upper and lower portion 30 and 40, respectively, upper portion 30 will assume an outwardly rearwardly taper as that of lower portion 40 but will overhang lower portion 40 to some extent with respective hinges 36 and 46 lying in the same vertical plane. Segment 30a will make an obtuse angle with respect to segment 40a (FIGS. 2 and 3) and, similarly, segment 30b will make an obtuse angle with respect to segment 401). Thus, segments.

30a and 30b will lie in diflerent planes and these planes will be different from the planes that segments 40a and 40b lie in. Hence, each segment will lie in a different plane thereby affording 4 differently oriented sound-reflecting or disbursing surfaces. When fully assembled, the weight of the various segments will tend to cause the segments to fold on one another in the normal manner; however, the connection of cable 13 between members 410 and 420 prevents this from occurring.

The base structure may then be assembled with leg 23 being received in strap 18 and screw 25 inserted through the respective apertures 19 and 24 with strut 22 holding leg 23 upright by means of the connection through aperture 27. Legs 23 will be received in tubular members 410 and42c, as shown in FIG 13. Respective pins 52 are adapted to extend through tubular members 410 and 420 through either apertures 50a and 50b or 51a and 51b. Pins 52 are provided with a ring 53 at the end thereof to facilitate grasping of the pin by the hand. A spring loaded ball 54 is received adjacer'it the end of pin 52, the end of which may be tapered as at 55 to facilitate the insertion of pin 52 into the desired bore. Thus, in FIG. 11, pin 52 is shown inserted in aperture 51b. Pin 52 is inserted until spring loaded ball 54 extends past the inner wall of the tubular member and is biased outwardly to maintain the pin in place. Legs 23 may then be inserted into the tubular member with pin 52 being received within slot 28 to thereby mount panel 211 to the base structure 11.

The height of panel 20 from the floor may be varied depending upon whether the pins 52 are received in apertures 50a, 5%, or apertures 51a, 51b. When the pins are received in apertures 51a, 51b, the height of panel 20 will correspond to the solid line portion of FIG. 2. When the pins are received within apertures 50a, 50b, the height of the panel 20 will be as indicated by the dotted line portion of FIG. 2. Legs 23 are spaced close to one end of horizontal bar 16 to overcome the turning moment generated by the top heavy panel 20.

The assembled units 21 may be joined to each other to form a shell 10 by placing the lower portions 40 of each unit together so the holes in the complementary hinge locks 47 are aligned with each other and inserting hinge pins 48 therethrough to maintain the panels in.

upright juxtaposed position.

In accordance with the objects of the present invention, I have provided a novel and extremely portable multi-facet acoustic panel which may be joined to similar panels to form a shell.

FIG. 9 illustrates a second embodiment of the present invention which comprises an upper portion having segments 130a and 13Gb which are respectively connected to frames 132 and 131 adjacent their outer peripheral edge by any conventional means such as rivets 134 so segments 130a and 13611 conform to the shape of the respective mounting frames.

In this embodiment, members 131a and 132a of respective frames 131 and 132 are vertical rather than tapering upwardly and inwardly from the bottom member as shown in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6.

It should be noted that the bottom edges of upper section 130 similarly taper outwardly, downwardly as shown in conjunction with upper section 30. Thus, upper section 130 will assume essentially the same position as upper section 30 did when the upper section 130 is mounted upon lower section 40.

When it is desired to disassemble the unit, the above noted steps relating to the assembling of same are reversed and the unit may be compactly folded for transportation or storage, as shown in FIG. 4.

By using the panel units comprising the invention, a shell can be easily and quickly erected. Moreover, the panels may be readily supported on accompanying stands which allow their height to be varied in accordance with the desired arrangement. The segments of each panel lie in separate planes to define a multi-facet acoustical structure which is relatively light in weight and which folds up to a compact size so the entire shell or individual units of same are fully transportable, and it will be further noted that the panels may be compactly superimposed on each other for storage and transportation purposes. The acoustical properties, due to the multifaceted segments which lie in different planes of the shell are excellent.

While specific embodiments of the invention have been shown and described in detail to illustrate the application of the principles of the invention, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied otherwise without departing from such principles.

What is claimed is:

1. For use in assembling an acoustical shell, a panel of sound-reflecting material arranged to be secured to similar panels in substantially abutting juxtaposed upright relation to form said shell; said panel including a lower section comprising a first pair of substantially identical segments each having side and top and bottom edges, said first pair of segments having cooperating elements along adjacent side edges to hingedly secure one segment to the other so one of said segments may be superimposed over the other of said segments for storage of said lower section; first means connected to the remote side edges of said segments adapted to maintain each of said segments in a predetermined position wherein each of said segments extends outwardly rearwardly from the hingedly connected edges when said lower section is in use; said panel further including an upper section comprising a second pair of substantially identical segments each having side' and top and bottom edges, said second pair of segments having cooperating elements along adjacent side edges to hingedly secure one segment to the other so one of said segments may be superimposed over the other of said second pair of segments for storage of said upper portion; cooperating elements connected to the respective top and bottom edges of said first and second pair of segments adapted to releasably connect said upper and lower portions together; the respective top and bottom edges of the lower and upper sections having complementary tapers such that the segments of said upper section respectively make an obtuse angle with respect to a different one of said segments of said lower section when said sections are releasably connected together.

2. For use in assembling an acoustical shell, a panel of sound-reflecting material arranged to be secured to similar panels in substantially abutting juxtaposed upright relation to form the shell; said panel including a lower section comprising a first pair of substantially identical rectangular segments each having side and top and, bottom edges; said first pair of segments having cooperating elements along adjacent side edges to hingedly secure one segment to the other, said segments extending outwardly rearwardly from the hinged side edges, first means connected to the remote side edges of said segments to maintain said segmentsin said position; said panel further including an upper section comprising a second pair of substantially identical segments, each having side and top and bottom edges, said second pair of segments having cooperating elements along adjacent side edges to hingedly secure one segment to the other, means for releasably connecting said upper section to said lower section, the top edge of asid bottom section and the bottom edge of said top section having complementary tapers so respective segments of said upper portion form obtuse angles with respective segments of said lower portion and the segments of said upper section taper outwardly rearwardly from said hinged side edges.

3. An acoustical shell forming panel, as defined in claim 2, wherein the top edges of said lower section taper upwardly outwardly from the hingedside edges and said bottom edges of said upper section tapers outwardly downwardly from the hinged side edges.

4. An acoustical shell forming panel, as defined in claim 2, wherein the remote side edges of said upper section taper upwardly inwardly toward said hinged edges.

5. An acoustical shell forming panel, as defined in claim 2, wherein said-means for releasably securing said top and bottom sections comprises complementary formed hinge locks-adjacent the ends of each segment of the respective top and bottom edges of said lower and upper sections, and hinge pins secured in each of said hinge locks, said hinge pins being provided with a handle to facilitate removal of same.

6. An acoustical shell forming panel, as defined in claim 2 and means connectedto the remote side edges of said lower section for connecting adjacent panels together, said means comprising hinge locks adjacent the ends of the side edges adapted to be aligned with complementary formed hinged locks on other panels, and hinge pins adapted to be inserted through said hinge locks when the panels are placed together and the hinge locks aligned to maintain the panels in place.

7'. For use in assembling an acoustical shell, a panel of sound-reflecting material arranged to be secured to similar panels in substantially abutting juxtaposed relation to form the shell; said panel including a lower section having a first pair of substantially identical tubular frames including side and top and bottom members, sound-reflecting material secured to each of said frames so said material conforms to the shape of said frames, adjacent side members of said frames having cooperating elements to hingedly secure one frame to the other, said frames lying in vertical planes that extend outwardly, rearwardly from said hinged members, first means connected to the remote side members of said frames to maintain each of said frames in its respective plane; said panel further including an upper section having a second pair of tubular frames comprising side and top and bottom tubular members, sound-reflecting material secured to each of said second pair of frames whereby said soundreflecting material conforms to the shape of said frames, said second pair of frames having cooperating elements along adjacent side members to hingedly secure one frame to the other, means connected to the top members of asid lower section and complementarily formed means connected to the bottom members. of said, upper section for releasably securing said lower section to said upper section, the bottom members of each of said frames comprising the upper section and the top members of each of said frames comprising the lower section being com.- plementarily tapered so respective frames of said upper section form obtuse angles with respect to respective frames of said lower section, and the frames of said upper section lie in planes which extend. outwardly rear.- wardly, from said hinged members, and supporting means for maintaining and supporting said panel in an upright position.

8. An acoustical shell forming panel as defined in claim 7, wherein the remote side tubular members ofthe frames forming the lower section are provided with apertures at the bottom thereof, said base structure including respective legs which are received through said apertures, within said tubular side members, and means extending across the tubular side member and engageable with said legs to prevent further penetration of the legs in said tubular side members beyond said means'to mount said panel on said legs.

9. An acoustical shell forming panel, as defined in claim 8, wherein each of said remote'side tubular members of the frames comprising the lower section are provided with aligned apertures which are spaced from each other along the height of the unit, said apertures having axes which are perpendicular to the axis of the tubular members, and a pin adapted to be inserted through an aligned pair of said apertures in the remote side members and engageable with the leg to mount the panel on said leg at a predetermined height with respect to the bottom of said base structure.

10. An acoustical shell comprising, in combination, a plurality of panels of sound-reflecting material, arranged to be secured together in substantially abutting uxtaposed relation to form the shell; each of said panels 1ncluding a lower section comprising a first pan of substantially identical segments each having side and top and bottom edges, said first pair of segments having cooperating elements along adjacent side edges to hingedly'secure one segment to the other, said segments being in a predetermined position wherein the segments extend outwardly, rearwardly to form a V as viewed from above, means connected to the remote side edges of said segments adapted to maintain each of said segments in a predetermined position; each of said panels further including an upper section comprising a second pair of substantially identical segments each having side and top and bottom edges; said second pair of segments having cooperating elements along adjacent side edges to hingedly secure one segment to the other, and cooperating elements connected to the respective top and bottom edges of said first and second pair of sections for releasably connecting said upper and lower sections together; the top edge of said lower section and the bottom edge of said upper section being provided with complementarily formed tapers such that respective segments of said upper section form obtuse angles with respect to respective segments of said lower section and each of the upper segments extend outwardly rearwardly from the hinged edges, means provided along the remote side edges of said lower sections for connecting adjacent side edges of adjacent panels together to form the acoustical shell, and a base structure for supporting said shell.

11. An acoustical shell as defined in claim 10, wherein the bottom edges of the upper section of each panel taper outwardly downwardly from said hinged edges, and the upper edges of said lower sections of each panel taper outwardly upwardly.

12. An acoustical shell as defined in claim 10, wherein the side edges of each of said top sections taper upwardly inwardly toward said hinged edges.

13. An acoustical shell as defined in claim 10, wherein complementarily formed hinges are connected to the remote edges of adjacent panels adjacent the .top and bottom of said lower section and are adapted to be aligned with complementarily located hinge locks on adjacent panels, and hinge pins adapted to be received within said hinge locks when so aligned for securing said panels to each other in juxtaposed relation.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,675,102 6/ 1928 Holland 18130 1,751,807 3/1930 Ford 160135 2,406,729 8/1946 White et al 160135 X 2,565,905 8/ 1951 Belau 160135 2,827,955 3/ 1958 Hurley 160-351 X 3,028,706 4/ 1962 Falconer.

FOREIGN PATENTS 346,792 4/ 1931 Great Britain.

LEO SMILOW, Primary Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification181/30, 160/135
International ClassificationG10K11/00, G10K11/20
Cooperative ClassificationG10K11/20
European ClassificationG10K11/20