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Publication numberUS3232423 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1966
Filing dateNov 17, 1964
Priority dateNov 17, 1964
Publication numberUS 3232423 A, US 3232423A, US-A-3232423, US3232423 A, US3232423A
InventorsMorton Smiler
Original AssigneeHoward G Fleisher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Phonograph record jacket
US 3232423 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. SMILER Feb. 1, 1966 PHONOGRAPH RECORD JACKET 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 17, 1964 INVENTOR. MORTON SMILER flZZI V A TORNEY Feb. 1, 1966 Filed Nov. 17, 1964 M. SMlLER PHONOGRAPH RECORD JACKET 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 72 Fig INVENTOR.

Y MORTON SMILER United States Patent P 3,232,423 PHONOGRAPH RECORD JACKET Morton Smiles, 9993 Woodfern Road, Philadelphia, Pa.,

assignor of one-half to Howard G. Fleisher, Meadowbrook, Pa.

Filed Nov. 17, 1964, Ser. No. 411,815 14 Claims. (Cl. 20662) This invention relates to phonograph record jackets, and it particularly relates to such jackets constructed of cardboard, chip board or similar inexpensive but relatively rigid material.

The adequate protection of phonograph records during storage, or when otherwise not in use, is becoming of ever-increasing importance since the advent of the socalled long-playing records, because not only are such records relatively expensive, but they are easily damaged by any slight scratch or nick, and they have a tendency to easily warp.

Warpage is an especial problem with such records be cause they are of relatively large diameter with the thickness decreasing from the central area toward the outer peripheral edge. Since the recorded matter is situated in the area between the central labeled portion and the outer peripheral edge, and since this area is extremely thin relative to its diameter, any slight distorting pressure for any substantial period of time often causes a warpage in this area.

Jackets of this general type heretofore available had various disadvantages or defects. For example, they usually consisted of an upper and a lower wall or panel having a front open end or mouth therebetween and a rear closed end or spine of substantial thickness. The two side edges were connected by an integral fold line or by adhesive or other connecting means.

The spine may have been formed in any one of several ways, as for example, by folding in a flap at an edge of one of the panels so that it lay between the two panels to form a spacer, or by inserting a separate spacer strip between the corresponding edge portions of the panels. In either case, the marginal portions at the side, being connected only by a fold line or the like, would not open square when the upper and lower walls were forced apart for insertion of the record, but would move away from each other angularly to form wedge-shaped marginal areas.

In such jackets, the open end or mouth had to be pried open by forcing the two panels away from each other in order to insert or remove a record. This was not only an annoyance to the customer or user, who often had to grapple with both the jacket and record in order to insert or remove the record, but was a serious problem in the assembly of the entire unit at the manufacturing or packaging plant. Furthermore, since the wedge-shaped side marginal areas were narrower than the mouth portion, the peripheral edge of the record would bind therein during insertion or removal. This was even a greater problem where the record was encased in a flexible envelope because the envelope not only increased the thickness of the insert but tended to wrinkle and tear under the force of the binding friction. It was, therefore, necessary to make the jackets substantially wider than the diameter of the records in order to compensate for these wedge-shaped marginal areas which became, in effect, dead spaces or Waste portions. This substantially increased the amount of materials used, and the consequent cost of manufacture was thereby also substantially increased.

The aforesaid type of prior construction also interfered with the effective stacking of the jacketed records, one upon the other. This is important to the manufacturer or packager because it is extremely diflicult to handle or store these items, thousands at a time, without a means of stack- 3,232,423 Patented Feta-1, 196$ ing them. They were diflicult to stack, however, because records are relatively thick at their center and taper radially outward to a thin edge. Since the construction of these jackets was such that the records were held tightly therein with the upper and lower walls held apart only by the records therebetween, the jackets followed the contour of the records and were thicker at the centers than at the edges. These differences in thickness, although slight for each jacketed record assembly, became appreciable when multiplied many times over in the stack. This made the stack unstable and often caused it to wobble and wall.

In addition, since only the rear edge of these prior jackets had any appreciable dimension, identifying indicia could only be printed on that edge. Consequently, if a record were horizontally or vertically stacked with any other edge showing, it could not be identified unless it were removed from the stack.

Some attempts were heretofore made to overcome the aforesaid problems. One such attempt consisted of forming flanges on the side edges of the jackets, overlapping these edges and then gluing them together. However, it was necessary to have the outer flange extend completely across the width of the inner flange and to have the inner flange extend completely across the inner surface of the outer flange in order to provide a smooth outer surface suitable for printing and a smooth inner surface which would not damage the periphery of the record. This meant that much material had to be wasted in the manufacturing process. Furthermore, in order to use a single blank and yet provide a rear spine of suflicient thickness to correspond to the thickness of the mating flanges, it was necessary to form the spine of a complex double fold. No effective and practical automatic machinery could be devised to make this intricate double fold in conjunction with the forming of the remainder of the jacket, and unless these jackets could be effectively mass-produced by automatic machinery, they would be too expensive to compete in the market for such goods.

It is, therefore, one object of the present invention to overcome the above difiiculties of the prior art by providing a record jacket having a uniform thickness throughout its area, and one which permits easy insertion and removal of a record, whether by itself or encased in a flexible envelope.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a record jacket of the aforesaid type which is easily and inexpensively constructed from a single blank.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a record jacket of the aforesaid type which is constructed with a minimum of material and a minimum of waste.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a record jacket of the aforesaid type which is simpler in construction and yet more sturdy than most record jackets heretofore available, and which permits easy and effective stacking thereof when filled.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a record jacket of the aforesaid type which is adapted for easy manufacture by automatic machinery.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a blank used in forming a jacket embodying the present invention, the blank being shown in fully opened position.

FIG. 2a is an enlarged, fragmentary, perspective view of the portion of the blank encircled in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2b is a fragmentary view similar to FIG. 2a but showing a portion of the blank folded into operative position.

FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of the blank folded into operative position and provided with a wrapper, the wrapper being shown in a position prior to being sealed.

FIG. 4 is a top perspective view similar to FIG. 3 but showing the wrapper and a top cover in position, the cover being partially pulled away to expose the adhesive.

FIG. 5 is a front elevational view of the jacket.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a blank illustrating an alternative form of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a top perspective view showing the blank folded into operative position.

FIG. 8 is an exploded, top perspective view showing the folded blank of FIG. 6, the wrapper and the outer cover prior to assembly.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified form of jacket.

Referring now in greater detail to the various figures of the drawings wherein similar reference characters refer to similar parts, there is shown in FIG. 1 a blank, generally designated 10, made of chip board, and comprising a bottom panel 12 integral with a top panel 14. The two panels 12 and 14 are integrally connected by a strip 16. The strip 16 is defined by two score lines 18 and 20, the score line 18 connecting the strip to the bottom panel 12 and the score line 20 connecting the strip to the top panel 14. The width of the strip 16 is shown in somewhat exaggerated size relative to its actual width, but this is only for the purpose of better illustrating the invention.

The score lines 18 and 20 are not cuts or slits but are impressions into the chip board whereby a groove is formed on the inside and a rib on the outside. In contrast to cuts or slits, which form lines of weakness, these impressed score lines actually form lines of strength because the scoring not only compresses and mats the fibers of the chip board whereby the fibers are more strongly interlocked but the outside ribs formed thereby are, themselves, elements of strength.

The bottom panel '12 is further provided with oppositely-disposed side flaps 22 and 24 that are integrally connected to the panel 12 by respective strips 26 and 28. The strips 26 and 2-8 are similar to the strip 16 and are similarly connected to their respective flaps by corresponding score lines 30 and 32 and to their respective edges of the panel 12 by corresponding score lines 34 and 36. The score lines 30, '32, 34 and 36 are similar to the score lines 18 and 20 and form the same inner grooves and outer ribs.

I The'jacket 'is' formed by first folding the strip 16, together with the top panel 14, around the score line 18 until the strip is perpendicular to the bottom panel 12. The top panel 14 is then folded around the score line 20 until it lies in spaced parallel relation to the bottom panel 12. In this position, as can best be seen in FIG. 2b, the ribs formed by the score lines 18 and 20 extend outwardly from the plane of the folded blank. They, therefore, not only provide lines of strength at the hinge portion but also have a biasing effect on the top and bottom panels whereby these panels are biased away from each other. This is very important because the opposed biasing force prevents the panels from collapsing toward each other and maintains the squared-off effect on either side of the strip 16. As a result, it is not necessary to use adhesive or other connecting means to maintain the jacket square, just so long as the panels are maintained in their folded position. Their maintenance in this folded position is accomplished by the wrapper 38 which is, in any event, always provided in this type of record jacket.

The two edge flaps 22 and 24 are then similarly folded into overlying position relative to the bottom panel 12, with the strips 26 and 28 similarly squared and the ribs formed by the score lines 30, 32, 34 and 36 similarly outwardly extending and biasing the flaps away from the bottom panel.

The flaps, in the folded position, have inner edges which are in butt contact with the side edges of the top panel 14. No overlapping is necessary because the bias of the parts alone maintains them in position. This results in a saving of material and also provides a smooth inner surface which will not tend to damage the records.

The wrapper 38 comprises a sheet of flexible material, which is usually glazed paper but may equally as well be any other desired flexible material. It is illustrated in FIG. 3 as being of a size to cover the bottom panel 12 and to have extension flaps 40 on three sides. Adhesive 42 is provided on the inner surface of preferably the entire sheet, although, if desired, the adhesive may be provided only on the inner surface of the flaps 40. In either case, the flaps 40 are folded around and over the marginal portions of the top wall 14 to secure the blank in its folded position. It is also possible, although less preferable, to make the sheet 38 of such dimensions that it completely overlies both the top and bottom panels.

Although the wrapper is illustrated as having adhesive on its inner surface and this adhesive may incidentally act to hold the folded-over flaps in position, with the present construction, it is possible to use other securing means or to use adhesive only on the margins so that no adhesive is present at the area of the flaps, yet the flaps would be held in the desired position by their own inherent bias, as explained above. Even in the jacket illustrated, where adhesive is used, if the adhesive should become worn or split away, the bias of the flaps would still maintain them in proper position so that there would be no inwardly-collapsed edges which might scratch the record.

After the illustrated blank has been folded into form and the wrapper applied (as shown in FIG. 4), a cover sheet 44 is applied over the top surface. This cover sheet, which is provided with adhesive 46 on its undersurface, is generally decorative in character, usually having color printing, designs, photographs, etc. depicting or relating to the contents. This cover sheet is generally of varnished or glazed paper, but may be constructed of any other desirable material.

FIG. 5 illustrates the completely rectangular opening at the mouth of the jacket which permits a record, either by itself or encased in a flexible envelope, to be easily slid into and out of the jacket, with no manipulation of the mouth required. Furthermore, the rectangular side and rear walls of the assembled jacket provide three separate surfaces for the printing of identifying indicia. Consequently, the jacket, with the record enclosed therein, may be stacked either horizontally or vertically, with any one of these three sides open to view, and the record therein can still be identified by the indicia.

In FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 there is shown a modified form of the invention wherein the blank, generally designated 50, comprises a bottom panel 52 substantially identical with the top panel 54, each panel being provided with oppositely disposed side flaps, as at 56 and 58 for the bottom panel and at 60 and 62 for the top panel. Each side flap is hingedly connected to a corresponding strip, as at 63 and 64 for the bottom panel and 66 and 68 for the top panel.

The strip 63 is connected to the flap 56 by a score line 70 and to a side extension 72 of the bottom panel by a score line 74.. The strip 64 is connected to the flap 58 by a score line 76 and to an extension of the bottom panel 78 by a score line 80. In similar manner, the strip 66 is connected by score lines 82 and 84 to respectively the flap 60 and extension 86 of the top panel while strip 68 is connected by score lines 38 and 90 to respectively the flap 62 and extension 92 of the top panel. These score lines are all identical to those in the jacket of FIGS. 1-5 and all provide for outwardly-extending ribs which serve to bias the parts away from each other.

The flaps, strips and extensions of the panels 52 and 54 form oppositely-disposed side wings on each panel. The

. side wings of one panel (here illustrated as the upper panel) are longer than those of the other panel, but all have inclined rear surfaces, as indicated at 94, 96, 98 and 100 respectively.

The top and bottom panels 52 and 54 are connected by a strip 102 similar to strip 16 and similarly defined by score lines 104 and 106, each of which provides an inner groove and an outer rib.

In forming the jacket from blank 50, the strip 102, together with top panel 54, is folded around score line 104 into a perpendicular position relative to bottom panel 52. The top panel 54 is then folded around score line 106 into a parallel, spaced position above bottom panel 52. In this position, the wings on the top panel overlie the straight edges of the bottom panel while the wings of the bottom panel underlie the straight edges of the top panel, the inclined edges 98 and 109 being complementary to and adapted to mate in edge-toedge abutment with the inclined edges 94 and 96.

The strips 63 and 64 are then turned up and the strips 66 and 68 are turned down into perpendicular positions relative to their respective panels, after which the flaps 56, 53, 60 and 62 are folded into spaced parallel position relative to their respective panels.

The wings of one panel are preferably smaller than the wings of the other panel because the mating inclined edges of the wings, when the blank is folded into position, form a slight line of weakness, and it is preferred that this line of weakness should be oil-center of the jacket. In the jacket illustrated, the wings of the upper panel are shown larger than those of the lower panel, but this may be reversed. The disadvantage of the line of weakness formed by the mating edges of the wings in the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 6-8 is, however, offset by the fact that each side comprises two flaps which are oppositely biased relative to each other. Therefore, if one of the flaps should be damaged or warped, or if its inherent bias should be otherwise lost, the other flap would continue to hold the upper and lower panels in the same parallel relationship at their side margins.

After the blank 50 is folded into its operative position, as shown in FIG. 7, the jacket is completed by applying the wrapper 108 and then the cover 110. It should here be noted that the parts to be assembled are reversed rela tive to the corresponding parts in FIG. 4, the folded blank being shown bottom uppermost and the wrapper being shown on top with the cover on the bottom. In all other aspects, however, the wrapper 108 and cover 110 are substantially identical to their corresponding elements in FIG. 4 and are applied in the same manner.

FIG. 9 shows a modified form of the invention wherein a record jacket, generally designated 112, in all other ways identical to that of either FIGS. 1-5 or 68, is provided with a slot 114 at its rear marginal portion. This slot 114 cuts through the rear wall 116 and partially through the top wall 118 and bottom Wall 120.

The purpose of slot 114 is to permit insertion of the fingers to push the record partly out of the mouth of the jacket to permit easy grasping whereby it can then be pulled out of the jacket.

Although the invention has here been illustrated in its preferable embodiments wherein the overfolded flaps are in butt contact with the corresponding edges of the panels, it is within the scope of the invention to make the fiaps overlap the outer surface of the panel. This is less preferable because it uses more material and provides an uneven outer surface at the marginal portions of the jacket. However, it may sometimes be desirable where additional strength is required at these marginal portions.

Obviously, many modifications of the present invent-ion are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is, therefore, to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced other wise than as specifically described.

The invention claimed is:

1. A jacket assembly comprising a blank constructed of 6 relatively rigid but bendable material, said blank being folded into a generally rectangular container having a top wall, a bottom wall, a rear wall, a pair of oppositely-dis posed side walls and an open end, said open front end comprising a rectangular mouth, said rear wall and said side walls being each defined at their opposite edges'by a pair of spaced, parallel score line and each being relatively rigid and extending in a fiat plane between the corresponding parallel score lines, each of said side walls being integral with a selected one of said top and bottom walls and having a flap portion in a plane common with the other of said top and bottom walls, and a flexible wrapper encompassing at least one of said top and bottom walls and said rear and side walls, said wrapper also at least partially encompassing the other of said top and bottom walls.

2. The jacket assembly of claim 1 wherein a cover sheet is secured in overlying position on the outer surface of that wall which is at least partially encompassed by said wrapper.

3. The jacket assembly of claim 1 wherein each of the score lines on the blank comprises an inner groove coincident with an outer ri-b, said score lines forming hinges for the folding of said blank.

4. The jacket assembly of claim 1 wherein each of said flap portions comprises a single flap which extends substantially the entire length of the corresponding side wall.

5. The jacket assembly of claim 1 wherein each of said flap portions comprises at least two flaps, one of said two fiaps being integral with said top wall and being positioned in the plane of said bottom wall and the other of said two flaps being integral with said bottom wall and being positioned in the plane of said top wall, said flaps being in linear alignment with each other along the length of the corresponding side wall.

6. The jacket assembly of claim 1 wherein each flap portion is provided with a free edge in butt contact with the corresponding side edge of the wall with which it shares a common plane.

7. The jacket assembly of claim 1 wherein the rear wall of the blank and that portion of the wrapper that encompasses said rear wall are perforated to provide an access slot.

8. In combination, a phonograph record jacket and a record releasably positioned within said jacket, said jacket comprising a blank constructed of relatively rigid but bendable material, said blank being folded into a generally rectangular container having a top wall, a bottom Wall, a rear wall, a pair of oppositely-disposed side walls and an open front end, said open front end comprising a rectangular month, said rear wall and said side walls being each defined at their opposite edges by a pair of spaced, parallel score lines and each being relatively rigid and extending in a flat plane between the corresponding parallel score lines, each of said side walls being integral with a selected one of said top and bottom walls and having a flap portion in a plane common with the other of said top and bottom walls, and a flexible wrapper encompassing 'at least one of said top and bottom Walls and said rear and side walls, said wrapper also at least partially encompassing the other of said top and bottom walls.

9. The combination of claim 8 wherein a cover sheet is secured in overlying position on the outer surface of that wall which is 'at least partially encompassed by said Wrapper.

10. The combination of claim 8 wherein each of the score lines on the blank comprises an inner groove coincident with an outer rib, said score lines forming hinges for the folding of said blank.

11. The combination of claim 3 wherein the rear wall of the blank and that portion of the wrapper that encompasses said rear wall are perforated to provide an access slot.

12. The combination of claim 8 wherein each flap por- 7 tion is provided with a free edge in butt contact with the corresponding side edge of the wall with which it shares a common plane.

13. The combination of claim 8 wherein each of said flap portions comprises a single flap which extends substantially the entire length of the corresponding side Wall.

14. The combination of claim 8 wherein each of said flap portions comprises at least two flaps, one of said two flaps being integral with said top wall and being positioned in the plane of said bottom wall and the other of said ,two fia-ps being integral with said bottom wall and being positioned in the plane of said top wall, said flaps being in linear alignment with each other along the length of the corresponding side wall.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 24,962 4/ 1961 Loderhonse 206-62 X 1,676,238 7/1921 Batty 22987 2,219,526 10/1940 McLaren 22968 FOREIGN PATENTS 120,609 5/ 19.01 Germany.

THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1676238 *Mar 29, 1926Jul 10, 1928Eastman Kodak CoPackage for photographic mounts
US2219526 *Dec 6, 1938Oct 29, 1940Mclaren John HGusset type envelope or file
USRE24962 *Jun 25, 1958Apr 4, 1961 Record jacket with detachable photographs
*DE120609C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3307772 *Jul 27, 1965Mar 7, 1967John Garrod NormanGramophone record sleeves
US3340999 *Feb 15, 1966Sep 12, 1967Modern Album And Finishing IncPhonograph record album
US3344978 *Aug 5, 1966Oct 3, 1967John Garrod NormanGramophone record sleeves
US4119198 *Feb 11, 1976Oct 10, 1978Modern Album And Finishing Co., Inc.Phonograph record album or similar item
US6762988Mar 27, 2002Jul 13, 2004David B. WoodCD card
US6802419Oct 11, 2002Oct 12, 2004Bert Co Industries, Inc.Package form and method of making a package
US6899223May 9, 2002May 31, 2005Bert-Co Industries, Inc.Form for a package and method of making same
US7100180Feb 11, 2004Aug 29, 2006Serious Ip, Inc.CD business card with container and/or adapter
US7387203Jan 26, 2004Jun 17, 2008Time Warner, Inc.Grooved board packaging and blank therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/312, 229/68.1, 229/75
International ClassificationB65D85/57
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/544
European ClassificationB65D85/54C