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Publication numberUS3233608 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1966
Filing dateNov 19, 1962
Priority dateNov 19, 1962
Publication numberUS 3233608 A, US 3233608A, US-A-3233608, US3233608 A, US3233608A
InventorsScaler Jr Frank
Original AssigneeScaler Jr Frank
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bandage with adhesive free areas
US 3233608 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 8, 1966 F. SCALER, JR

BANDAGE WITH ADHESIVE FREE AREAS Filed NOV. 19, 1962 W" R mo NE WA m 5 K N m F A 7' TOP/VEVS United States Patent F This invention relates to surgical bandages and more.

particularly to a bandage which is adapted to be applied very easily to parts of the body without applying adhesive tape directly to the skin. i

The application of surgical dressings to body wounds is often a time consuming task particularly in the treatment of burn cases and the like where it is necessary to employ bandaging techniques which do not require the direct application of adhesive material to the patients skin. Thus, the person applying the dressing may provide a very satisfactory dressing by successively applying a pluralitygof materials, such as, gauze pads, wrapping strips, and finally adhesive, but the procedure requires such a large number of steps and selection of different materials that excessive time is thereby consumed; doctors are delayed, and other patients are kept waiting.

It is ar object of this invention to provide surgical bandages which may be applied to parts of the body very rapidly and will form secure and effective bandages.

It is another object of the invention to provide such bandages which can be applied to a patient without applying any adhesive materials directly to the patients skin.

It is another object of the invention to provide such bandages which can be prepared very economically by surgical supply houses so that they can be available in large quantity in hospitals and doctors oflices where the time saved with efiicient bandaging operations may be very valuable.

It is another object of the invention to provide such a bandage which is very versatile in its uses in order that it will be practical to keep bandages available for immediate use when the occasions for their use arise.

Other bbjects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description read in conjunction with the attached drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a bandage constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is an edge view of the bandage of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a schematic view illustrating the manner of application of the bandage of FIGS, 1 and 2 to a patients arm for instance; and

FIG. 4 is an edge view of the bandage of FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrating the manner in which the bandage is prefolded and packaged in accordance with this invention so that the bandage may be used most efficiently.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, the bandage illustrated therein comprises an elongated strip of surgical dressing cloth having a surgical dressing pad 12 attached thereto at a position where the pad 12 divides the strip 10 into a short portion 14 at one end of the strip and a long portion 16 at the other end of the strip. The pad 12 may be formed of any desired surgical dressing material, such as layered gauze which is either treated or untreated as desired, and the strip 10 may be formed of the same or different surgical material but is preferably formed of the specially woven gauges which are conforming, that is which are sufliciently flexible to permit them to be wrapped around non-cylindrical members. The pad 12 may be attached to the strip 10 'by any means which the surgical supply house prefers, as for instance by the application of adhesive to the back of the pad 12.

As can be best seen from FIGS. 1 and 2, two patches of adhesive material 18 and 20 are applied to the strip 10 in selected areas of the short portion 14 and long portion 3,233,608 Patented Feb. 8, 1966 16 respectively. The adhesive patch 18 is applied to the opposite side of the strip 10 from the pad 12, and the adhesive patch 20 is applied to the same side of the strip 10 as the patch 12. As indicated in FIG. 3, the positioning of the two patches of adhesive 18 and 20 in this manner permits the bandage to be wrapped very effectively around a patients arm or the like with the adhesive patch 18 holding the first turn of the bandage in place while the remainder of the bandage is wrapped and with the adhesive patch 20 holding the outermost turn of the bandage in place. In this" regard, the bandage may be made in a number of different lengths depending upon the part of the body to which'it is intended to be applied, but regardless of the length of the bandage, the bandage is held together effectively by the two adhesive patches 18 and 20 Without requiring the direct application of any adhesive material to the patients skin.

As indicated in FIG. 4, the bandage is pre-folded and packaged to permit its very rapid use in applying it to a wound. Thus, the long and short portions 16 and 14 respectively of the strip 10 are folded in aplurality of accordion folds to thereby form a pile made of a plurality of superposed and connected layers of the strip 10 with the pad 12 positioned on one end of the pile and with the short portion 14 of the strip 10 extending along one side of the pile and forming the layer 22 of the pile which is on the opposite end of the pile from the pad 12. In this folded arrangement of the bandage, the two adhesive patches 18 and 20 are positioned in the pile of accordion folds so that they contact adjacent layers of the pile which do not carry adhesive so that the adhesive patches may be separated from the pile easily. The entire bandage, folded as indicated in FIG. 4, is enclosed in. a sterile envelope which is indicated schematically at 24; obviously, the envelope has a thin dimension along the length of the pile of bandage but is illustrated in enlarged condition to facilitate illustration of the folding of the bandage.

When the bandage is kept available at a dressing station in the packaged condition illustrated in FIG. 4, it may be applied very rapidly and efficiently to a wound which is to be dressed. Thus, the bandage may be removed from the envelope and the gauze pad 12 placed on the wound before the unfolding of the strip 10 is started. With the pad 12 in place on the wound, the short portion 14 of the strip may be removed from the accordion folded pile and held at one side of the wound while the long portion 16 of the strip is wound around the patients arm or the like to bring it in contact with the adhesive patch 18. In this regard, it should be noted that it is desirable to space the adhesive patch 18 slightly inwardly from its adjacent end of the strip 10 to provide a non-adhesive end portion on the strip which may be grasped and held while the first turn of the bandage is made. Once the first turn of the bandage is made around the patient and adhesively secured to the patch 18, the remaining turns of the bandage may be made very simply, and the upper turn may be secured in place by pressing the adhesive patch 20 onto the outermost turn of the bandage.

While one specific embodiment of this invention has been illustrated and described in detail herein it is obvious that many modifications thereof may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A folded bandage adapted to be applied easily to parts of the body which comprises an elongated strip of surgical dressing having first and second ends and first and second side faces extending between said ends, a surgical dressing pad attached to said strip on said first face thereof adjacent to said first end, a patch of adhesive material attached to said strip on said second face thereof adjacent to said first end, and a second patch of adhesive material attached to said strip on said first face thereof adjacent to said second end with said strip folded in a series of accordion folds with said strip defining a pile of connected superposed layers with said pad on one end of said pile and with said patches of adhesive material on layers of said pile and contacting adjacent layers which do not carry adhesive material.

2. A folded bandage adapted to be applied easily to parts of the body which comprises an elongated strip of surgical dressing having first and second ends and first and second side faces extending between said ends, a surgical dressing pad attached to said strip on said first face thereof at a position defining a short portion of said strip between said pad and said first end of said strip and a long portion of said strip between said pad and said second end of said strip with said long portion being at least twice as long as said short portion, a first patch of adhesive material attached to said second face of said strip in said short portion thereof, and a second patch of adhesive material attached to said first face of said strip adjacent to said second end of said strip, said strip being folded in a series of accordion folds defining a pile of connected superposed layers of said strip with said pad on one end of said pile and with said patches of adhesive material on layers of said pile and contacting adjacent layers which do not carry adhesive material, and with said short portion of said strip extending from said pad along the side of said pile and forming the layer of said 4 pile which is on the opposite end of said pile from said pad.

3. A folded bandage adapted to be applied easily to parts of the body which comprises an elongated strip of surgical dressing and a surgical pad attached to said strip intermediate of the ends of said strip and dividing said strip into a short portion between said pad and one endof said strip and a long portion between said pad and the other end of said strip with said long portion being at least twice as long as said short portion, said strip being folded in a series of accordion folds defining a pile of connected superposed layers of said strip with said pad on one end of said pile and with said short portion of said strip-extending from said pad along the side of said pile and forming the layer of said pile which is on the opposite end of said pile from said pad.

References Cited by the Examiner I UNITED STATES PATENTS 688,354 12/1901 Sonneborn 128t167 X 866,666 9/1907 Mace 12 8169 2,815,752 12/1957 Forman 128170 FOREIGN PATENTS 370,222 12/1906 France.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. I JORDAN FRANKLIN, Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US688354 *Jan 7, 1901Dec 10, 1901Stafford Hydropathic Company Of Baltimore CityBandage or compress.
US866666 *Aug 16, 1906Sep 24, 1907Homer Monroe MaceSurgical bandage.
US2815752 *Dec 22, 1954Dec 10, 1957Everett W FormanCircular adhesive bandage
FR370222A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3930506 *Jun 3, 1974Jan 6, 1976Overend Thomas FDisposable phlebotomist's tourniquet
US4088133 *Sep 13, 1976May 9, 1978Products International CompanyElectrode for electrosurgical procedure
US4205674 *Aug 23, 1977Jun 3, 1980Amir PoratSurgical dressing
US5107826 *Oct 12, 1990Apr 28, 1992Roland AnderssonCorrective posture device
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/58, 206/440
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0273
European ClassificationA61F13/02H