Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3234941 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1966
Filing dateJan 22, 1964
Priority dateJan 22, 1964
Publication numberUS 3234941 A, US 3234941A, US-A-3234941, US3234941 A, US3234941A
InventorsTucker Annabelle D
Original AssigneeTucker Annabelle D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective shield
US 3234941 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 15, 1966 A. D. TUCKER PROTECTIVE SHIELD 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 22, 1964 Feb. 15, 1966 A. D. TUCKER 3,234,941

PROTECTIVE SHIELD Filed Jan. 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. FIG-IO //V/V/9BAL Q Tor/(t7? 71%, azflwmm United States Patent ()fifice 3,2343% Patented Feb. 15, 1966 3,234,941 PROTECTIVE Sit-HELD Annabelle D. Tucker, 4480 Sherman Oaks Ave, Sherman Oaks, Calif. Filed Jan. 22, 1964, Ser. No. 339,414 14 Claims. (Cl. 128154) This invention relates generally to protectors for afilicted areas of flesh and more particularly the invention relates to shields and bandages for the protection of wounds, sores, abrasions, etc.

Some wound protectors or shields of the prior art are formed from a base, which may be curved to generally fit a body portion, the base having a bulged central area or dome in order to accommodate the aifiicted area. Such shields are made of a generally rigid material and are further provided with means to secure them to the afflicted area. Such shields, while possessing the necessary strength to resist crushing or other deformation in use are bulky and hence are often not easily packaged or stored.

Other wound protectors, shields, or bandages of the prior art are formed from generally flat pliant material, such as rubber, or medicated material, for example, paper, and are later bent, pressed, or otherwise formed into shape to fit over the afflicted area. Such shields are com pact, inasmuch as they are initially flat, and are easily packaged or stored as a result, but lack the strength to resist deformation in use and must be provided with additional supports to secure the needed strength.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a wound protector, shield, or bandage which is generally flat until used and which is thus easily packaged and/ or stored as a consequence.

Another object is to provide a wound protector, shield, or bandage of the aforementioned type which is easily formable into a structure having a raised portion to accommodate the wound or affiicted area when used.

Still another object is to provide a wound protector, shield, or bandage having the foregoing advantages which has sufiicient strength to resist deformation in use and thus offers good protection to the wound or afflicted area to be protected.

A wound protector in accordance with the present invention includes a generally flat piece of a resilient semirigid material, for example polyethylene plastic, having at least one primary notch or wedgeshaped cut out portion which permits the fiat piece of material to be formed into a wound cover by manipulating the material in the neighborhood of the at least one primary cut out portion. Means for attaching the wound cover to an afflicted area is also provided to complete wound protector or shield.

The primary wedge-shaped cut out portion has its apex disposed in the interior of the fiat piece of material and is the origin of a pair of sides which extend to the outer periphery of the flat piece of material, subtending an angle therebetween. The angle preferably is acute, ranging from essentially zero, in the case of a mere cut, slit, or seam in the material, up to but not including a right angle. Thus the outer periphery of the flat piece of material may be constricted by bringing the sides of the at least one primary cut out portion together, with or without overlapping thereof, and in response thereto at least a portion of the fiat piece is forced into a raised position. The fiat piece may have additional or secondary cut out portions to compensate for overlapping to form smooth contours.

Wound covers thus formed may be used by themselves, solely as protectors or shields for afllicted areas, or may be used in conjunction with medicated material for the treatment of afflicted areas, thus forming part of a bandage.

A wound protector or shield is defined as a wound cover plus means to attach it to a wearers flesh and a bandage is defined as a wound protector or shield plus medicated material attached thereto.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which are presented by way of example and illustration only and are not intended as a limitation to the present invention as defined in the appended claims, like parts being indicated by like numerals throughout the various views, and in which:

FIG. 1a is a top plan view of a wound protector or shield according to the present invention prior to its being applied to an afliicted area;

FIG. lb is a sectional view of the wound protector of FIG. la taken along line bb thereof;

FIG. 10 is a view like FIG. 1b but showing the wound protector as applied to an afiiicted area;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view disclosing details of relationship of mating parts of FIG. 1a, but different from those disclosed in FIG. 1a;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of a wound protector according to the present invention prior to being applied to an afflicted area, but showing a different manner of attachment than FIG. 1;

FIG. 4a is a top plan view of a wound protector according to the present invention as applied to an affiict-ed area showing a manner of attachment different from either FIG. 1 or FIG. 3;

FIG. 4b is a sectional view of the wound protector of FIG. 4a taken along line bb thereof;

FIGS. 5a and 5b are schematic top plan views of species of wound covers different from the one shown in FIGS. 1-4, shown prior to application to an afflicted area;

FIG. 50 is a schematic top plan view of the wound cover of FIG. 511 but shown as applied to an afflicted area;

FIGS. 6a, 6b, and 6c are schematic top plan views of species of wound covers different from those previously disclosed, shown prior to application to an afliicted area;

FIGS. 7a, 7b, and 7c are schematic top plan views of the wound covers of FIGS. 6a, 6b, and 60 respectively, shown as applied to an afflicted area;

FIGS. 8a and 8b are schematic top plan views of species of wound covers different from those previously disclosed, prior to application to an afflicted area;

FIG. is a schematic top plan view of the wound covers of FIGS. 8a and 812, shown as applied to an afflicted area;

FIGS. 9a, 9b, and 9c are schematic top plan views of wound covers different from those previously disclosed, shown prior to application to an affiicted area;

FIGS. 10a, 10b, and are schematic top plan views of the wound covers of FIGS. 9a, 9b, and 9c respectively, but shown as applied to an afiicted area;

FIGS. 11a and 1112 are top plan and elevational views respectively of a bandage having medicated material attached to the wound cover of FIG. 5b, shown prior to application to an afflicted area;

FIGS. 12a and 12b are views like FIGS, 11a and 11b respectively, but shown as applied to an afflicted area;

FIG. is a sectional view along line 0-0 of FIG. 12a;

FIG. 12d is a sectional view like FIG. 12c, but disclosing an additional element; and

FIGS. 13a and 13b are bottom plan and elevational views respectively of an element present in the bandage of FIGS. 11a and 11b.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIG. 1, there is shown a wound protector or shield generally designated 10 and being made up of a generally fiat disc-shaped wound cover generally designated 12 and adhesive strips 24, 26, 28 and 30 to secure the cover 12 in place.

Wound cover 12 is preferably perforated with apertures 14, preferably has a turned up periphery 16 for the comfort of the wearer, and has a wedge-shaped cut out portion 18 which has a pair of edges 20 and 22. Edges 20 and 22 are brought together to transform the flat cover 12 into a cone having an apex 32, as best seen in FIG. 1c, and strips 24, 26, 28 and 30 are then affixed to the wearer. Edges 20 and 22 are normally brought into abutting relationship in practice, but need not necessarily abut, and may overlap to some extent; if they overlap, they may be locked by reversing the direction of turn of the periphery 16 in the neighborhood of one of the edges, whereby the locking arrangement of FIG. 2 is produced.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there is shown a wound protector generally designated 34 and being made up of generally flat disc-shaped wound cover 12 and generally parallel adhesive strips 36 and 38. Wound cover 12 is formed into a cone as previously described, causing strips 36 and 38 to overlap somewhat, generally, whereupon the strips are affixed to the wearer.

Referring now to FIG. 4, a wound protector is generally designated 40 and includes an adhesive strip generally designated 42 and a conical cover generally designated 50; preferably the protector includes a member 60 hinging the conical cover to the adhesive strip.

Adhesive strip 42 has a generally centrally disposed well or orifice 44 extending therethrough and preferably has a reinforcing collar 46 attached thereto, the collar 46 having a well or orifice 48 of the same size and generally aligned with well 44 to form a continuous well or orifice therewith. Disposed within said continuous well is constricted conical cover 50 which is split at seam 52, has an apex 54, preferably has a pair of tabs 56 to aid in installing and removing it, and is preferably perforated by apertures 58. Adhesive strip 60 connects the portion of the conical cover behind the split to collar 46. Conical cover 50 is initially generally flat and disc-shaped and has a wedge-shaped cutout portion like cover 12, but is formed into a conical shape by forcing the edges of the cut out portion together, preferably with the aid of the tabs. Then the comically shaped cover is placed into the well and released, whereupon it spreads laterally due to its resiliency to contact the sides of the well. Adhesive strip 60 is then affixed to act as a hinge, if desired.

FIG. discloses other species of conical covers which may be employed in the present invention. FIG. 5a shows a generally flat disc-shaped cover 62 preferably having apertures 64, and having a wedge-shaped cut out portion 65 having edges 66 and 68, but lacking a turned up periphery. FIG. 5b discloses a generally flat discshaped cover 70, preferably having apertures 72, and being split at seam 74. As best seen in FIG. 5c, seam 74 has a first edge 74a and a second edge 74b, the two edges being overlapped to form a flap 76 and to form the fiat cover into a cone having an apex 78.

FIGS. 6 and 7 disclose other non-conical covers which may be employed in the present invention. FIG. 6a discloses a generally fiat polygon having corners 81, 82, 83, 84 and 85, apertures 86 and which is split at seam 87, with an overlapping or flap portion 88 being indicated by means of the broken line. In FIG. 7a, the fiat polygon has been formed into a rectangular pyramid by overlapping portion 88 thereof. The pyramid has an apex 89 and generally flat sides 90, 91, 92 and 93.

FIG. 611 discloses a generally flat polygon 94 having corners 95, 96, 97, 98 and 99, being split at seam 100 and having an overlapping or flap portion 101 indicated by the broken line. Polygon 94 preferably is perforated with apertures 102. In FIG. 7b, the polygan has been formed into a triangular pyramid by overlapping portion 101 thereof, the pyramid having an apex 103 and fiat sides 104, 105 and 106.

FIG. 60 discloses a generally fiat polygon 107 having corners 108, 109, 110, 111, 112 and 113, is split at seam 114 and has an overlapping or flap portion 115 as indicated by the broken line. The polygon preferably has apertures 116. In FIG. 70 the polygon has been formed into a square pyramid by overlapping portion 115 thereof, the pyramid having an apex 117 and fiat sides 118, 119, 120 and 121.

FIG. 8 discloses still other species of wound covers which may be employed in the present invention. A generally flat strip of material having generally semicircular end portions is split at seams 123 and 124 at opposite ends and has overlapping or flap portions 125 and 126 as indicated by the broken lines. The fiat strip is preferably perforated with apertures 127. Alternatively, the flat strip may have wedge-shaped cut out portions 128 and 129 instead of overlapping portions. In FIG. 80, the flat strip has been formed into a raised cover by overlapping the fiap portions or by bringing the edges of the cut out portion together, the cover having semi-conical end portions 131 and 132, and faces 133 and 134 with a reinforcement such as ridges 135 therebetween. Such reinforcement may be used in other embodiments such as those in FIGURE 10.

FIGS. 9 and 10 disclose still other species of wound covers which may be employed in the present invention. FIG. 9a discloses a generally fiat polygon having corners 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, and 146, being split at seams 147, 148 and 149, and having overlapping or flap portions 147a, 148a, and 149a adjoining the respective seams, and indicated by the broken lines. In FIG. 10a, the flat polygon has been formed into a frustrum of a triangular pyramid having flat sides or faces 150, '151, and 152 as well as a flat triangular top 153 by overlapping the flap-portions.

FIG. 9b discloses a generally flat polygon 155 having corners 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162 and 163, being split at seams 164, 165, 166, and 167, and having overlapping or flap portions 164a, 165a, 166a, and 167a adjacent the respective seams and indicated by the broken lines. In FIG. 10b, the fiat polygon has been formed into a frustrum of a square pyramid by overlapping the flap H portions, the pyramidal section having flat side faces 168,

169, 170 and 171 and flat square top 172.

FIG. 90 discloses a generally flat strip having ends which are segments of a circle and having corners 176, 177, 178, and 179. The ends are split at seams 180, 181, 182 and 183 and have overlapping or flap portions a, 181a, 182a, and 183a adjacent the respective seams and indicated by the broken lines. In FIG. 100, the fiat strip has been raised by overlapping the flap portions into a frustrum-like structure having curved sides or faces 184, 185, 186, and 187, and a fiat rectangular top 188.

Referring now particularly to FIGS. ll-l3, a wet bandage is generally designated and includes a generally fiat disc-shaped cover 70 being split at seam 74, inert flexible tubes generally designated 192 attached thereto near the outer periphery thereof, and an inner liner of absorbant or medicated material 210.

Tubes 192 each have a sealed end 194 attached to the top of cover 70 near the outer periphery thereof, and an open end 196, the tubes being arranged radially to form a focus of open ends 196 at 208, with the tubes being compressed together and flattened as is necessary to form the focus. All of the cover is so covered except overlapping portion 76 thereof. Tubes 192 each further have a mouth 198, a wall 200, an underside 202 which is perforated by apertures 204 and is positioned abutting the top of the cover, being filled with packing 206 of an absorbant material, preferably cotton. As aforesaid, the tubes focus their open ends about point 208 and the wound cover is preferably provided with an inner liner 210 of absorbant material. Thus liquid or wet medicant may be introduced through the mouths 198 of the open ends of the tubes where it will be absorbed and retained by the packing 206 but from which it may trickle through apertures 204 of the tubes, especially if squeezed, through apertures 72 of the cover to inner liner 210 which will absorb the liquid medicant and keep it in close proximity to the afflicted area. Alternatively, the cover may be employed with the inner liner only which has dry or Wet medicants associated therewith, the liner being absorbant in the case of a wet medicant. A closure member may be provided for the mouths of the tubes if desired.

The Hat piece of material initially forming the wound cover may have any peripheral shape, but preferably is a circle having a primary cut out or split, which becomes a cone upon being forced into final constricted position. Also preferred is a polygon having a primary split extending generally from one corner to the center thereof, permitting overlapping and becoming a pyramid upon being forced into final constricted position; the polygon preferably also has a secondary cut out portion permitting it to have a smooth base when so overlapped. Further preferred are polygons having primary splits extending generally from the corners thereof to the interior, permitting overlapping at each corner and becoming a frustrum of a pyramid when forced into final constricted position; the polygon preferably has a secondary cut out portion at each corner permitting it to have a smooth base in the final o-r constricted position. For elongated afflicted areas are preferred strips having ends which are either semi-circular or are segments of circles and having at least one primary cut out or split at each end, and becoming inverted V-shaped covers having semi-conical ends and which may be sharp or fiat on top upon being forced into final constricted position.

The periphery of the flat piece of material initially forming the wound cover is preferably enlarged or turned, preferably up, in order to present a smooth surface to the wearer. Overlapping portions may be locked in place by reversing the direction of the turn of the periphery on opposite portions which overlap, causing the oppositely turned peripheries to interengage.

Medicated material, wet or dry, may be attached to the top or bottom of the cover in any convenient manner, the function of the cover being to lend stiffness to the bandage and to act as a support. An inner liner inside the cover, if thin enough, may have a seam, split, or cut aligned with the seam, split or cut of the cover and may be overlapped therewith. If too thick, the inner liner may be separately placed inside the constricted cover prior to attachment to an afflicted area.

Any of the wound covers with or without medicated material attached disclosed hereinbefore may be attached to an affiicted area in any convenient manner, as by adhesive running thereover, or about the periphery thereof, or may be attached to the adhesive strip 42 of the protector of FIG. 4 by making the well 44 thereof of a configuration to accept the cover when constricted and placed therein.

Although several embodiments of a wound protector in accordance with the present invention have been illustrated in detail and described above, it should be expressly understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the present invention as set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A wound protector or shield comprising a generally flat piece of resilient semi-rigid material having an outer periphery, an interior, and at least one wedge-shaped cut out portion having an apex and a pair of sides, the apex being disposed in the said interior and the pair of sides originating at said apex and extending to the said outer periphery and subtending an angle therebetween, whereby the said periphery may be constricted and at least a portion of the interior raised by bringing the material of at least one side portion of said cut-out portion into close proximity of a second side portion thereof, thereby forming an elevated wound cover; and securing means on said protector for attachment thereof to an afflicted area.

2. The wound protector or shield as defined in claim 1 in which the said periphery of the said flat piece of material is at least partly circular.

3. The wound protector as defined in claim 2 in which the flat piece is generally a strip having ends which are segments of a circle.

4. The wound protector as defined in claim 3 in which the strip has generally semi-circular ends.

5. The wound protector as defined in claim 1 in which the generally flat piece of material is a polygon.

6. The wound protector as defined in claim 5 in which the polygon is generally pentagonal.

7. The wound protector as defined in claim 5 in which the polygon is generally rectangular.

8. The wound protector as defined in claim 5 in which the polygon is generally triangular.

9. A wound protector or shield comprising a generally flat piece of resilient semi-rigid material having an outer periphery, an interior, and at least one wedge-shaped cut out portion having an apex and a pair of sides, the apex being disposed in the interior of the shield and the pair of sides originating at said apex and extending to the said outer periphery and subtending an angle therebetween; whereby said periphery may be constricted by overlapping said sides thereby forming an elevated portion in the interior of said shield; and strip means engageable with said shield for attachment thereof to an afllicted area, said means including a well portion contoured to receive the periphery of said shield.

10. A bandage including the wound protector or shield as defined in claim 1 and as an additional element a liner positioned inside the wound cover thereof.

11. A bandage according to claim 11 in which the wound cover is perforated and the liner is of absorbant material.

12. A bandage according to claim 11 in which the additional element of a source of liquid medicant is provided, the said source being attached to the wound cover.

13. A bandage according to claim 12 in which the source of liquid medicant is a multiplicity of flexible tubes filled with absorbant material.

14. A bandage according to claim 13 in which the tubes are perforated in such a manner as to allow liquid medicant to trickle therethrough.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,443,140 6/1948 Larsen 128154 2,646,795 7/1953 Scholl 128153 2,711,166 6/1955 Digate 128153 X 2,771,877 11/1956 Kligman et al. 128l53 2,875,758 3/1959 Fuzak et al 128157 3,062,210 11/1962 Scholl 128156 ADELE M. EAGER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2443140 *Apr 11, 1946Jun 8, 1948Robert E LarsenBoil cup
US2646795 *Dec 21, 1950Jul 28, 1953Scholl William MCorn cushion
US2711166 *Sep 18, 1953Jun 21, 1955Scholl Mfg Co IncSurgical pad with digit loop and method of making the same
US2771877 *Jan 10, 1955Nov 27, 1956Johnson & JohnsonPad
US2875758 *May 29, 1957Mar 3, 1959Boles Bernard JFingertip bandage
US3062210 *Aug 21, 1958Nov 6, 1962William M SchollMedicated pad or bandage and method of making the same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3971374 *May 5, 1975Jul 27, 1976Wagner William HSymmetric padded bandage for injured palm of either hand
US4212296 *Apr 20, 1978Jul 15, 1980The Kendall CompanyBandage with protective member
US4516968 *Sep 28, 1982May 14, 1985Marshall Charles ACatheter shield and method of use
US4856504 *Oct 15, 1987Aug 15, 1989Vitaphore Corp.Antimicrobial wound dressing and skin fixator for orthopedic pins
US4971066 *Jun 28, 1989Nov 20, 1990Mobil Oil CorporationApparatus and method for conducting mammalian dermatological studies
US4972829 *Nov 23, 1988Nov 27, 1990Knerr Richard PAir cure bandage
US5060662 *Jul 6, 1990Oct 29, 1991Farnswoth Iii Kenneth FOpen air bandage
US5080661 *Apr 18, 1991Jan 14, 1992Hollister IncorporatedFixation pin entry site dressing and method
US5144958 *Aug 22, 1990Sep 8, 1992Mobil Oil CorporationApparatus for conducting mammalian dermatological studies
US7628767 *Sep 18, 2007Dec 8, 2009Simmons Kathy AMethod for preventing infection and maintaining aseptic epidermal areas using a reusable non-deforming flexible protective cover
US7695444 *Sep 18, 2007Apr 13, 2010Simmons Kathy AFlexible protective cover for preventing fluid from entering an open epidermal site
US8237008 *May 24, 2010Aug 7, 2012Alessandrini Jose APartially rigid bandage apparatus
US20100228172 *Mar 2, 2010Sep 9, 2010Kent BiddingerToe protectors, shrouds, and protective covers for shrouds
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/888, 604/307
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/02
European ClassificationA61F13/02