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Publication numberUS3235307 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1966
Filing dateJun 1, 1964
Priority dateJun 1, 1964
Publication numberUS 3235307 A, US 3235307A, US-A-3235307, US3235307 A, US3235307A
InventorsKnabusch Edward M, Shoemaker Edwin J
Original AssigneeLa Z Boy Chair Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining chair
US 3235307 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 15, 1966 E. M. KNABUscH ETAL 3,235,307

RECLINING CHAIR Filed June 1, 1964 s sheets-sheet 1 a 27A/5x51 Feb. 15, 1966 E. M. KNABUscH ETAL 3,235,307

RECLINING CHAIR Filed June l, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet z Feb. 15, 1966 E. M. KNABUSCH ET AL 3,22fl,307

REGLINING CHAIR @www N @C M M ma@ a ,d

Filed June l, 1964 United States Patent O 3,235,307 RECLINING CHAIR Edward M. Knabusch and Edwin I. Shoemaker, both of Monroe, Mich., assignors to La-Z-Boy Chair Company, Monroe, Mich., a corporation of MichiganV Filed June 1, 1964, Ser. No. 371,730 8 Claims. (Cl. 297-321) This invention relates generally to chairs :and particularly to a chair which is movable between an upright sitting position and a reclining position; and is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Serial No. 333,281, filed December 26, 1963.

The reclining chair yof this invention is one where the chair seat and back are supported on a base and counterbalanced so that the user may, by leaning back in the chair and applying pressure by his shoulders and upper back, pivot the chair back rearwardly and move the chair seat forwardly and upwardly, simultaneously, into a reclining position. Reclining chairs of this type are well known as illustrated by applicants U.S. Patent No. 2,781,823, issued February 19, 1957, for Reclining Chair, and U.S. Patent No. 2,779,392, issued January 29, 1957, for Reclining Chair with Exte-nsible Footrest. However, these reclining chairs as well as others heretofore known, utilized complex linkages for supporting the chair back and seat. Thus, they had the drawback of being not only more costly to manufacture but also they were heavy, and bulky and more difcult to style.

Applicants U.S. Patent No. 3,096,121, for Reclining Platform Rocker Chair, issued July 2, 1963, illustrates a chair having a relatively light and simple linkage farrangement supporting the seat and back for reclining movement. However, the chair illustrated therein is a rocking chair and is rocked rearwardly by the user when it is actuated to its reclining position in order Ito provide a comfortable reclining chair which does not pull on the users clothing and which does not tend to cause the user .to slide forwardly in the chair.

The chair which is the subject of the present invention is not Vof the rocking' type but is provided with a rigid frame pivotally mounted on a fixed base. A relatively light, simple, and inexpensive linkage interconnects the chair back, seat, frame and base in such a manner that as the user applies rearward pressure by his shoulders and upper back to the chair back, the rigid frame will tilt rearwardly on the base, the chair back will pivot rearwardly on the frame and the chair seat will move forwardly and upwardly to a reclining position which herein is intended to include any position from .the upright sitting to and including a fully reclined position. This rearward tilt-movement ofthe rigid frame during actual reclining of the seat and back will prevent the users clothing from being pulled and the user from feeling as though he is sliding forwardly in an uncomfortable manner when the chair is undergoing reclining movement. The chair is provided with a friction device adapted to maintain the chair seat and back in any reclined position.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a reclining chair of the aforementioned type wherein the 'back and seat thereof are readily movable from an upright sitting position to a reclining position.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a relatively light and simple supporting linkage for a reclining chair of the above type which permits easy movement from a sitting position to a reclining position,

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a reclining chair having a frame pivotally mounted on a base and having a seat and back supported for reclining movement on said frame wherein as said frame is ice tilted rearwardly the sea-t and back are moved to a reclining position.

It is a further object of the present invention to proivde a reclining chair of the aforementioned type which is frictionally maintained in any reclined position while easly movable from a reclining position to an upright position.

It is a further object ofthe present invention to provide a reclining chair of the aforementioned type wherein the supporting linkagethe seat and back are maintained relatively free from play in use.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a reclining chair of the aforementioned type which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture, sturdy in construction, and reliable in operation.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent `from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a reclining chair constructed according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the chair of FIG. 1, with the back and seat cushions removed;

FIG. 3` is a sectional view ofthe structure illustrated in FIG. 2 taken along line 3--3 thereof;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing the chair in its reclined position in solid lines and in a partially reclined position in dot and dash lines;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the structure illustrated in FIG. 2 taken along line 5 5 thereof;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of a portion of the structure illustrated in FIG. 2 taken along line 6 6 thereof; and

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of a portion of the structure illustrated in FIG. 4 taken along line 7-7 thereof.

Referring now to the drawings, a chair frame, generally indicated at 1, is seen to include a pair of side frame members 3 rigidly joined to a pair of back frame members 7 in an appropriate manner. The side frame members are joined at their @forward ends by a top front rail 9 and a bottom front rail 11 while the back frame members are interjoined by a rear rail 13. The bottom rail 11 has an upstanding portion 15 intermediate its ends interjoined to the underside of the top rail 9 in an appropriate manner. A pair of arm rests 17 are each provided with upholstered cushions 18 and are rigidly fixed at their rearward ends to the top of the back frame members 7, respectively, and at their forward ends to one end of a pair of depending arm portions 19. The other ends of the depending arm portions extend downwardly to and are interjoined with the bottom front rail 11. Suitable braces and corner members are provided for interconnecting the aforementioned frame members rigidly to provide a Vstrong chair `frame structure.

The chair frame 1 is supported for limited pivotal movement by a pair of spaced parallel base members 23 interconnectedl by a pair of cross rails 27. As seen in FIGURES 3, 4 and 7, a pair of support brackets 31 are rigidly attached to the base members 23, respectively, and pivotally support the side members 3 by a pair of pins or |bolts 35 carried thereby. Thus, the chair frame 1 is pivotable from the position shown in FIGURE 2 to the position shown in full lines in FIGURE 4 in a manner to be described. To limit the forward pivotal movement of the chair frame 1, a pair of stop blocks 39 may be provided and xed to the side frame members 23, respectively, and positioned for engagement with a pair of stop cushions 43 carried by the side frames 3 through a pair of support members 47 fixed thereto. In the alternative, aportion of the bottom front rail 11 may abut the cross rail 27 to limit the forward movement of the chair frame 1.

A chair seat 51 and back 53 have a seat cushion 52 and a back cushion 54 attached thereto, respectively, and are shown in FIGURES 2 and. 4 with the cushions removed. The seat 51 is generally rectangular in shape having a front frame member 55, a rear frame member 57, and a pair of side frame members 59. A duplicate pair of linkages, generally indicated at 63 (FIGURE 3), support the forward portion of the seat 51 at each side thereof for movement from the sitting position to the reclining position. Thus, each of the linkages 63 includes as wing lever 65 pivotally attached at one end thereof by a pin 67 to a bracket 69 in turn fixed to the side frame member 59 of seat 51 by screws 71. The other end of the lever 65 is pivotally joined to one end of a link 73 by a pin or bolt 75 while the other end of the link 73 is pivotally mounted on the base member 23 by a pin 77 and a bracket 79. An intermediate portion of the link 65 is pivotally attached to the support member 47 by a bolt S1. The length of the link 73 and the positioning of the pivot pin 77 relative to the pivot pin or bolt 35 is such that as the user leans back in the chair and applies forward pressure to the chair seat 51 by his body, the chair seat 51 will move upwardly and forwardly as the swing lever 65 is pivoted clockwise relative to the chair frame 1 about the bolt 81 and, simultaneously, the chair frame 1 will be reclined rearwardly about the pins or bolts y35 from the FIGURE 2 position to the FIGURE 4 position. This is so since as the chair seat 51 yis moved forwardly, it will cause clockwise pivotal movement of the swing lever 65 about the pin 81 and, therefore, counterclockwise pivotal movement of the link 73 about the pin 77.

A duplicate pair of tension springs 80 is provided at each side of seat 51 to normally bias the chair seat 51 toward the upright or sitting position illustrated in FIG- URE 2 and in dot and dash lines in FIGURE 4 and will maintain the chair seat, back and linkages free from play during use. Thus, springs 80 have their end portions fixed to an adjacent one of the side rails 59 and base members 23, respectively, through suitable screw eyes 8-2. As the chair seat 51 moves upwardly and. forwardly to the FIG- URE 4 position, springs 80 will be placed under a greater tension being proportional to the extent of seat forward movement. This tensional force will serve both to aid in moving the chair seat back to the upright or sitting position, illustrated in FIGURE 2, as well as maintain the chair seat, back and linkages free from play both in the reclining and upright sitting positions.

The chair back 53 is supported on the rear frame members 7, and interconnected at each 4side thereof with the chair seat 51 by a pair of identical linkages generally indicated at 83. (See FIGURE 3.) Thus, each of the linkages 83 includes an arm 89 rigidly attached to the back frame member 7 by a pair of bolts 87. Pivotally attached at one end thereof to the arm 89 by a bolt or pin 93 is a rear swing lever 91 while the other end is pivotally attached to a friction slide member 95 by a bolt or pin 97. An intermediate portion of the rear swing lever 91 is xed to the chair back 53 by bolts 99 while a bolt or pin 103 pivotally attaches a portion of the rear swing lever 91,

intermediate the pins or bolts 99 and 97, to a bracket 101. A plurality of screws 105 tixedly mount the bracket 101 to the underside of the seat frame member 59 while the slide member 95 and bracket 101 are mounted for relative sliding movement by an adjustable friction assembly generally indicated at 107 and shown in greater detail in FIGURE 5.

The slide member 95 is seen to include a plurality of plates 109 provided with aligned elongated openings 111. A washer member 113 is provided with diametrically opposed axially extending spurs 115 slidably received within the openings 111. A bolt member 117 is freely received in a pair of aligned openings 119 and 121 formed in the washer 113 and in the bracket 101, respectively,

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and has an enlarged head portion 123 at one end thereof for engagement with the washer 113. The other end of the bolt 117 is threadedly received by a wing nut 125. An axial compression spring 127 has one end thereof in engagement with the wing nut 125 while the other end engages an annular washer 129 adjacent the bracket 101. A plurality of friction spacer elements 131 are positioned between the plates 109 in surrounding relationship to the bolt 117 and the bolt 97. This friction device is adapted to maintain the chair seat and back in a reclining position which includes any position between the upright sitting position and a fully reclined position. Additionally, the degree of frictional resistance to sliding movement between the plates 109 and the washer 113, and, consequently the bracket 101 is determined and may be regulated by adjustment of the wing nut 125 to adjust the pressure applied between the plates 109 and the spacer elements 131.

In operation, a user seated in the chair, applies pres-y sure by his upper back and shoulders to the chair back 53 causing it to tilt rearwardly or counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 2 about the pin or bolt 93. This will cause icounterclockwise pivotal movement of the rear swing lever 91 through bolts 99 about the pin or bolt 93 and will in turn effect upward and forward movement of the rear portion of the chair seat 51 in an arcuate path relative to the chair frame 1 through pivot pin 103 and bracket 101. As the swing lever 91 pivots counterclockwise, the slide member 95 will be moved forwardly rela-f tive to the adjustable assembly 107.

When the user applies rearward pressure to the chair back 53 and forward pressure to the chair seat 51, the` chair seat 51 will move forwardly and upwardly through the front swing lever 67 and the chair frame 1 will recline rearwardly about the pins or bolts 35, as was hereinabove described. The chair back and seat will thus have been moved from the upright or sitting position, illustrated in FIGURE 2, through a reclining position and finally to the fully reclined position, illustrated by the solid line showing in FIGURE 4. As may be seen in the solid line showing in FIGURE 4, when the chair back and seat are moved to reclining positions, the chair frame will be tilted rearwardly thereby providing a comfortable position for the user. Because of the rearward tilting movement of the chair frame 1, there will be no tendency to pull on the users clothing or to slide the user forwardly to an uncomfortable position.

To reposition the chair in the upright or sitting position from a reclining position, the user need only redistribute his weight so as to remove pressure from the chair back 53 and cause forward tilting of the chair frame 1. Thus, as the user raises his back, the chair back 53 is free for forward or clockwise pivotal movement about the pin 93 as viewed in FIGURES 2 and 4. When the user raises his back, his weight is then so distributed that it will tend to move the chair seat 51 rearwardly and downwardly. This will cause clockwise pivotal movement of the link 73 through counterclockwise pivotal movement of the front swing lever 65, and, simultaneously, will effect movement of the chair frame 1 to its upright or sitting position. The repositioning of the chair in the .upright or sitting position is aided by tension springs as described hereinabove.

A manually operated extensible leg rest assembly is seen to include a leg rest 132 supported by the chair frame 1 for movement from a retracted position (FIG. 2) to an extended position (FIG. 4) and having an upholstered cushion 133 thereon. Thus, a pair of identical compound parallelogram linkages generally indicated at 133, are connected at one end thereof to either side of the legl rest 132 and at the other end to an actuating shaft 137., The linkages 133 are designed to produce the desired translational and rotational movement of the leg rest 132'. so that the leg rest is moved from a retracted position adja-y cent the front end of the seat portion 51- (see. FIG. 2)

mesmo? to an extended position in which it is substantially spaced from the seat portion (see FIG. 4).

The actuating shaft 137 is square in cross section and is rotatably supported within a pair of flanged bushings 139 disposed for lateral sliding movement in the side frame members 3, respectively. One end of the actuating shaft extends beyond the side frame 3 and an actuating lever 143 is mounted thereon, a collar 145 preferably being interposed between the side frame 3 and the lever 143. Each of the linkages 133 is provided with a U-shaped link 147 having parallel arms 149 and 151 and an intervening web portion 158 disposed upon the square shaft 137 inwardly of the side frame member 3. The arm portions 149 and 151 are provided with aligned square openings which snugly receive the shaft 137. Thus, the shaft 137 is rotatable, by the lever 143, from a position shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 to a position shown in FIG. 4. This rotational movement will, through the linkages 133, move the leg rest 132 from the retracted` position, shown in FIGURES 13 to the extended position, shown in FIG- URE 4. A link 154 is positioned adjacent each side of the chair frame 1 and each is pivotally attached, at one end thereof, to a bracket 155 fixed to the top front rail 9 by a pair of screws 161i. The other end of each of the links 154 is freely disposed over the shaft 137 adjacent the arms 151 of the U-shaped links 147 thereby maintaining the U-shaped links 147 adjacent the side frame members 3 and the shaft 137 substantially normal to the side frames 3 and prevents any tendency of the shaft 137 or the links to bind.

Each of the compound parallelogram linkages 133 is pivotally attached to the chair frame 1 at two points and is pivotally connected to the leg rest 132 at two points. The rst pivotal connection between the linkages 133 and the chair frame is provided by the pivotal relation between the U-shaped links 147 and the side frames 3 by means of the actuating shaft 137. The second pivotal connection between the linkages and the chair frame is that existing between a pair of arms 153 and a pair of brackets 155 by pins or bolts 156, which brackets are fixedly attached to the top rail 9, respectively. At each side of the chair, a link 157 is pivotally associated with the arm 151 of the U-shaped link 147 by a pin or bolt 159 and is pivotally associated with the arm 153 by a pivot pin 161. For true parallelogrammatic action, the distance between the pivots 137 and 159 should equal the distance between pivots 156 and 161 and the distance between pivots 137 and 156 should equal the distance between pivots 159 and 161. However, to obtain rotational movement of the leg rest 132 as well as translational movement thereof upon rotation of the actuating shaft 137, the likage departs from a true parallelogram.

Each of the arms 153 is further pivotally associated to one end of a link 163 by a pin or bolt 165 while the forward end of each of the links 157 is pivotally associated with one end of a link 167 by a pin or bolt 169. The links 163 and 167 are pivotally interconnected at intermediate points thereof by a pivot pin 171. The distances here between pivots 151 and 169 and pivots 165 and 171 are or may be equal as well as the distances between pivots 161 and 165 and pivots 169 and 171 to give the motion of the leg rest 132 desired.

The foremost portion of the link 163 is pivotally attached to the leg rest 132 by a pin or bolt 173 while the foremost portion of the link 167 is pivotally associated with one end of a short link 175 by a pin or bolt 177. To complete the parallelogram linkage, the other end of the short link 175 is pivotally attached to the leg rest 132 by a pin or bolt 179. Again, the distance between the pivots 171 and 177 is not exactly (or may be substantially) equal to the distance between pivots 173 and 179 and the distance between the pivots 171 and 173 is (or may be substantially) not exactly equal to the distance between the pivots 177 and 179 to give the desired translational movement to the leg rest 132. Thus, counterclockwise rotation t5 of the shaft 137 as viewed in FIGURES 2 and 4 will cause the leg rest 132 to be moved from its retracted position (shown in FIG. 2) to its extended position (shown in FIG. 4), while clockwise rotation of the shaft 137 will retract the leg rest from the position shown in FIGURE 4 to that shown in FIGURE 2.

To accurately position the leg rest 132 in its extended and retracted positions, a limit stop device is provided on each of the linkages 133. Thus, the links 157 are each provided with an arm portion 181 extending rearwardly of the pivot pin or bolt 159 and having an upwardly extending lip portion 183. Each of the arms 151 has formed thereon a tab portion 185 positioned to engage the lip portions 183 when the leg rest 132 is in its extended position as shown in FIGURE 4. Movement of the leg rest 132 toward the retracted position shown in FIG- URE 2 is limited by contact thereof with the upstanding portion 15 of the bottom rail 11. Thus, the leg rest 132 is positively limited in its extended and retracted positions.

Means is provided to insure and maintain proper functioning and positioning of the leg rest. A substantially semicircular toggle link 189 is positioned adjacent each U-shaped link 147 and has one end thereof pivotally attached to an arm 191 fixed to the shaft 137. The other end of the toggle link 189 receives one end of a tension spring 193, the other end of which is fixed to the side frame 3. Thus, when the shaft 137 is in the position shown in FIG. 2 and the leg rest 132 is in its retracted position, the force of the spring 193 tending to move the toggle link 189 in a left-hand direction will also tend to rotate the shaft 137 clockwise. This will maintain the leg rest 132 completely retracted by insuring engagement between the leg rest and the upstanding portion 15. However, when the shaft 137 is rotated counterclockwise, by rotation of the handle 143, to the position shown in FIGURE 4, counterclockwise rotational movement will also be imparted to the arm 191. The toggle links 139 will be raised and will then exert a torsional force on the shaft 137 tending to rotate it counterclockwise. This will, as may be seen, maintain the leg rest in its extended position by insuring contact between the lips 183 and the tabs 185. The spring 193 may be designed with any degree of tension; however, it is desirable that this spring be strong enough to maintain proper positioning of the leg rest 132 without making it unduly diiicult to manipulate the same, even after wear of the parts has resulted.

While a preferred embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described hereinabove, various additions, substitutions, omissions, and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention as encompassed by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A reclining chair including a frame pivotally mounted on a base for limited rearward tilting movement relative thereto, a chair seat supported by said frame for movement from a sitting position to a reclining position, a chair back pivotally mounted on said frame for movement from an upright sitting position to a reclining position and interconnected with said chair seat for conjoint movement therewith to said reclining position when said seat is moved to its reclining position, a rst link means pivotally mounted on said base, a second link means pivotally attached to said seat and to said first link means, and means pivotally supporting said second link means on said frame whereby rearward pivotal movement of said frame will cause said rst link means to move said second link means and thereby said seat and back to their reclining positions and forward pivotal movement of said frame Will cause movement of said chair back and seat to their sitting positions.

2. A reclining chair including a frame pivotally mounted on a base for limited rearward tilting movement relative thereto, a chair seat supported by said frame for movement from a sitting position to a reclining position, a chair back pivotally mounted on said frame for movement from an upright sitting position to a reclining position and interconnected with said chair seat for conjoint movement therewith to said reclining position when said seat is moved to its reclining position, a first link means mounted on said base, a second link means interconnecting said seat and said first link means, and means movably supporting said second link means on said frame whereby rearward pivotal movement of said frame will cause said first link means to move said second link means and thereby said seat and back to their reclining positions and forward pivotal movement of said frame will cause movement of said chair back and seat to their sitting positions.

3. A reclining chair as recited in claim 2 and further including a friction means resisting said conjoint movement of said chair back and seat.

4. A reclining chair as recited in claim 2 further including means biasing said seat toward said sitting position.

5. A reclining chair as recited in claim 3 wherein said friction means is adjustable to provide a variable resistance for seat conjoint movement.

6. A reclining chair having a frame pivotally mounted on a base for rearward tilting movement relative thereto, a chair seat supported by said frame for movement from a sitting position where said seat is supported on said frame to a reclining position where said seat is spaced upwardly and forwardly of said frame, a chair back pivotally associated with said frame for movement from an upright sitting position to a reclining position where said back is tilted rearwardly relative to said frame and interconnected with said seat for conjoint movement therewith to said reclining position when said seat is moved to its reclining position, and means interconnecting said base with said seat, said last named means comprising a first link means pivotally mounted at one end thereof on said base, a second link means pivotally supported at an intermediate point thereof on said frame, means pivotally interconnecting one end of said second link means to said seat at a point rearwardly of said intermediate point, said first link means extending forwardly of its pivotal mounting and being pivotally interconnected at its other end to the other end of said second link means whereby rearward tilting of said frame will cause said first link means to move said second link means and thereby said seat and back to their reclining positions and forward tilting movement of said frame will cause movement of said chair back and seat to their sitting positions.

7. A reclining chair having a frame pivotally mounted on a base for rearward tilting movement relative thereto, a chair seat supported by said frame for movement from a sitting position where said seat is supported upwardly and forwardly of said frame, a chair back pivotally associated with said frame for movement from an upright sitting position to a reclining position where said back is tilted rearwardly relative to said frame and interconnected with said seat for conjoint movement therewith to said reclining position when said seat is moved to its reclining position, and means interconnecting said base With said seat, said last named means comprising a first link means pivotally mounted at one end thereof on said base, a second link means pivotally supported at an intermediate point thereof on said frame, spring means interposed between said base and said seat to normally bias said seat to said sitting position, means pivotally interconnecting one end of said second link means to said seat at a point rearwardly of said intermediate point, said first link means extending forwardly of its pivotal mounting and being pivotally interconnected at its other end to the other end of said second link means whereby rearward tilting of said frame will cause said first link means to move said second link means and thereby said seat and back to their reclining positions and forward tilting movement of said frame will cause movement of said chair back and seat to their sitting positions.

8. A reclining chair having a frame pivotally mounted on a base for rearward tilting movement relative thereto, a chair seat supported by said frame for movement from a sitting position where said seat is supported on said frame to a reclining position where said seat is spaced upwardly and forwardly of said frame, a chair back pivotally associated with said frame for movement from an upright sitting position to a reclining position where said back is tilted rearwardly relative to said frame and interconnected with said seat for conjoint movement therewith to said reclining position when said seat is moved to its reclining position, and means interconnecting said base with said seat, said last-named means comprising a first link means pivotally supported at an intermediate point thereof on said frame, a tension spring having one end fixed to said seat and the other end fixed to said base to bias said seat toward said seating position, means pivotally interconnecting one end of said first link means to said seat at a point rearwardly of said intermediate point, a

second link means pivotally mounted at one end thereof on said base, said second link means extending forwardly of its pivotal mounting and being pivotally interconnected at its other end to the other end of said first link means whereby rearward tilting movement of said frame will cause said first link means to move said second link means and thereby said seat and back to their reclining positions, and forward tilting movement of said frame will cause movement of said chair back and seat to their sitting positions.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,222,578 11/1940 Walenta 297-303 2,781,823 2/1957 Knabusch et al. 297-85 2,893,472 7/1959 Repaich 297-88 3,065,989 11/1962 Mohler 297-88 3,096,121 7/1963 Knabusch 297-269 3,131,965 5/1964 Mohler 297-89 3,134,627 5/1964 Mason 297-303 FOREIGN PATENTS 560,979 4/ 1957 Italy.

FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3325210 *Oct 23, 1965Jun 13, 1967La Z Boy Chair CoAdjustable leg rest locking device
US3330595 *Jan 20, 1966Jul 11, 1967Svard Alf GeorgChair, especially dentist's chair
US3339971 *Oct 21, 1965Sep 5, 1967Peter S FletcherRecliner-rocker chair
US3352601 *May 19, 1966Nov 14, 1967Mohasco Ind IncChair
US3357739 *Apr 25, 1966Dec 12, 1967La Z Boy Chair CoLounge chair
US3371958 *Aug 10, 1965Mar 5, 1968Nat Furniture Mfg Co IncCombination reclining and rocking chair
US3484132 *Mar 21, 1968Dec 16, 1969La Z Boy Chair CoRecessed furniture handle
US3484133 *Mar 21, 1968Dec 16, 1969La Z Boy Chair CoRecessed furniture handle
US6089593 *Feb 10, 1997Jul 18, 2000Hill-Rom, Inc.Ambulatory care chair
US6154899 *Oct 19, 1998Dec 5, 2000Hill-Rom, Inc.Resident transfer chair
US6185769Oct 18, 1999Feb 13, 2001Hill-Rom, Inc.Resident transfer chair
US6315319Apr 10, 2000Nov 13, 2001Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Ambulatory care chair
US6565112Sep 26, 2001May 20, 2003Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Ambulatory care chair
US6726279Sep 13, 2000Apr 27, 2004Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Hydraulic controls for ambulatory care chair
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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/321, 297/269.1, 297/69
International ClassificationA47C1/034, A47C1/031
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/0345
European ClassificationA47C1/034F2