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Publication numberUS3235989 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1966
Filing dateDec 12, 1962
Priority dateDec 12, 1962
Publication numberUS 3235989 A, US 3235989A, US-A-3235989, US3235989 A, US3235989A
InventorsBrooks Jackson R
Original AssigneeExcellart Extrusion Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sign framework
US 3235989 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 22, 1966 R R S 3,235,989

SIGN FRAMEWORK Filed Dec. 12, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 I, 36 33 30 F lg. H 27 1 INVENTOR 4 5 Jackson R. Brooks BY WHITEHEAD, VOGL a LOWE PE MZ ATTORNEYS Feb. 22, 1966 J R. BROOKS 3,235,989

SIGN FRAMEWORK Filed Dec. 12, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 4O 42 IN VENTOR 42 44 4| Jackson R. Brooks BY WHITEHEAD, VOGL a LOWE 5 Mz/Q ATTORNEYS Fig. 7

Feb. 22, 19 66 J. R. BROQKS SIGN FRAMEWORK Filed Dec. 12, 1962 v 2/ Q-r/ $4 4M 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Jackson R. Brooks BY WHITEHEAD, VOGL GLOWE ATTORNEYS Feb. 22, 1966 J: R. BROOKS 3,235,989

SIGN FRAMEWORK Filed Dec. 12, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

Jackson R. Brooks BY WHITEHEAD,VOGL 8| LOWE PER ZMZ 4 I ATTORNEYS Feb. 22, 1966 J. R. BROOKS 3,235,989

SIGN FRAMEWORK Filed Dec. 12, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Jackson R. Brooks BY WHITEHEAD, VOGL GLOWE PER ATTORNEYS United States Patent ice 3,235,989 SIGN FRAMEWORK Jackson R. Brooks, Fort Collins, Colo., assignor to Excellart Extrusion Company, Fort Collins, Colo., a partnership composed of Jackson R. Brooks and Chester V.

Brooks Filed Dec. 12, 1962, Ser. No. 244,090 4 Claims. (Cl. 40-430) This invention relates to signs of the class which may be designated as internally-lighted signs, and more particularly to the structural framework therefor, a primary object of the invention being to provide a novel and improved structural framework for an internally lighted type of sign and to thereby produce also, an improved sign structure. Accordingly, the invention will be hereinafter referred to as a framework for an internally lighted sign, and simply as a sign framework.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved framework for an internally lighted sign consisting of a simple, structurally-rigid, array of easily interconnected components which are functionally formed to facilitate their manufacture as from metal extrusions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved sign framework having, as its primary components, extruded metal members, with each member being formed in a simplified, functional manner so as to require an absolute minimum number of individual components in a finished sign, and with each component being of minimum weight and minimum bulk.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved sign framework of a simple, rigid basic construction which is easily adapted to be used with many various types of sign facings and is especially adapted to be used with preformed dished types plastic facings of material such as Plexiglas.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved sign framework which may be formed as a light-weight unit that is especially adapted to be used with modular facing sections of various plastic materials.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved framework for internally lighted signs which forms a neat, compact edging around the sign, yet with ample wire-way space therein to accommodate wiring and ballast without cramping and, permits easy access to the interior of the sign for maintenance and repair through the provision of easily removable facing retainers and without the need of removing end portions of the framework itself.

Another object of the invention is to provide in a novel and improved sign framework an improved, simplified and versatile arrangement of facing retainers which are especially adapted to be self-draining and thereby protect the interior of the sign against moisture as during severe rain storm conditions.

Yet other objects of the invention are to provide a novel and improved framework for internally lighted signs which is a neat-appearing, sturdy, rugged, and durable unit that may be manufactured at very low cost and with a minimum of special shop equipment and facilities, as a mass production item and also as custom produced of individualized units.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, all of which more fully hereinafter appear, my invention comprises certain constructions, combinations, and arrangements of parts and elements as hereinafter described, defined in the appended claims and illustrated in preferred embodiments in the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a sign constructed according to the present invention, illustrating the sign 3,235,989 Patented Feb. 22, 1966 as being hung underneath a beam, and with the sign frame being enclosed by dished, offset faces.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational View of a different style and type of sign, also constructed according to the present invention, illustrating the sign as being cantilevered from a post and with the sign frame being enclosed by flat, sheet-type faces.

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of a third sign, of yet another style also constructed according to the present invention, illustrating the sign as being hung vertically, as on brackets outstanding from a wall and With the sign face area being enclosed by a plurality of modular, dishformed offset faces.

FIGURE 4 is a perspective sectional view of a portion of the sign illustrated at FIG. 1, as from the indicated line 4-4 at FIG. 1 but on an enlarged scale.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary sectional detail of a portion of the sign illustrated at FIGS. 1 and 4, as taken from the indicated line 55 at FIG. 4 but on a further enlarged scale, and illustrating surface configurations on the frame members not shown at FIGS. 1 and 4 because of the small scale at which the drawings were made.

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary, isometric view of a corner portion of the sign illustrated at FIGS. 1 and 4, but on an enlarged scale, with the facing members being broken away to show constructions otherwise hidden from view, and also illustrating surface configurations not shown at FIGS. 1 and 4.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary, perspective exploded view, on a further enlarged scale, of certain elements and portions of other elements which are interengaged to make up the sign frame shown at FIGS. 1 and 4.

FIGURE 8 is a sectional, cabinet view of a portion of an improved type of a facing carrier, which constitutes an element in the sign construction illustrated in the FIGS. 17, the view being illustrated on a greatly enlarged scale and with a fragment of a facing member illustrated as being set therein.

FIGURES 9 and 10 are similar to FIG. 8 but illustrating alternate constructions of facing carriers for different types of facings, FIG. 9 being illustrated with a fragment of a corrugated type of casing and FIG. 10 being illustrated as the fragment of a double-wall type 01 facing.

FIGURE 11 is a transverse, sectional elevational view of the alternate style of sign construction illustrated at FIG. 2, as taken from the indicated line 1111 at FIG. 2 but on an enlarged scale.

FIGURE 12 is a sectional view substantially of a portion of the showing at FIG. 11, as taken from the indicated line 1212 at FIG. 2 but on a further enlarged scale and also illustrating surface configurations not shown in FIGS. 2 and 11 because of their small scale.

FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary isometric View of a corner position of the sign illustrated at FIGS. 2 and 11 as taken substantially from the indicated arrow 13 at FIG. 11 but on an enlarged scale, with the facing members being removed and with portions of the frame members being broken away to show constructions otherwise hidden from view, and also illustrating surface configurations not shown in FIGS. 2 and 11.

FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary, perspective exploded view on a further enlarged scale, of certain elements and portions of other elements which are interengaged to make up the sign frame shown at FIGS. 2 and 11.

FIGURE 15 is a perspective view of a portion of the sign illustrated at FIG. 3, as taken from the indicated line 15-15 at FIG. 3 but on an enlarged scale.

FIGURE 16 is a fragmentary isometric view of portions of elements illustrated at FIG. 15, as viewed from the indicated arrow 16 at FIG. 15 but on a further enlarged scale.

A large number of advertising signs are manufactured which may be characterized or designated as internally lighted signs, in contrast other types of signs such as billboards. These internally lighted signs are manifestly more complex in their construction than ordinary signs, for they usually include a pair of opposing display faces mounted within a rectangular framework wherein an electrical lighting system is located. The framework will include necessary structural supporting members to rigidify the sign and other members and arrangements of members to hold and support the lighting means within the sign. The display \faces cannot be relied upon for any structural purpose. They are commonly formed of glass or translucent plastic materials such as Plexiglas with lettering, figures, and symbols on the faces varying in many ways and patterns. In large signs there is difficulty in the faces even supporting themselves.

This is especially true of Plexiglas faces. Yet since this material and other acrylite-type plastics have desirable qualities such as light-weight, moldability and luminescence, the material is in demand as sign faces. Because of its structural weakness, it is not even self- Supporting on large signs, and thus it is often mounted on such signs in a modular fashion with mullion members across the sign face to hold the individual modular face members in position.

In further detail, conventional types of internally lighted signs are usually formed upon a rectangular lframework shaped by structural members and sheet metal sections into a suitable channel form to provide space for holding the wiring and ballast for the lights therein. Various retaining strips are affixed to each side of the framework to hold the edges of the sign faces.

The present invention was conceived and developed to meet the need for an improved framework for signs of this class since certain disadvantages were inherent in conventional types of sign frames. Such disadvantages were primarily the weight, cost, and inconvenience of access for maintenance of the sign itself. The present invention takes advantage of modern and comparatively recent developments in the formation of extruded metal members and particularly of light-weight extruded aluminum sections. It was discovered that by using extruded aluminum sections for selected members of the framework, a sign framework structure could be devised which would combine several necessary functions of good sign construction into a single member and require an absolute minimum number of individual components. At the same time, such a construction will include ample channel space within the framework to contain wiring, light receptacles and ballast which is necessary where neon and fluorescent lights are used. The final structure is of utmost simplicity of design which combines not only a minimum number of individual components but also forms a neat-appearing, rigid, strong, and light-weight unit.

Referring to the drawing and specifically to the sign construction illustrated at FIGS. 1 and 4-7, the sign therein depicted is shaped typically as a narrow, box-like unit formed upon the improved frame 21 with a display face 22 being mounted at each side of the frame. This sign may be mounted for display in any suitable manner, such as at FIG. 1 where the sign 20 is suspended from an overhead beam B. It is attached thereto as by clip angles 23. To complete the mounting installation, a power line 24 extends from any suitable source and into the interior of the sign through a suitable opening 25, as at one end of the sign.

The rectangular frame 21 is formed by beam-like members about the periphery of the sign, including a top member 26, an opposing bottom member 27 and upright end members 28. Consonant with the use of extruded metal components in this sign, the frame members 26, 27, and 28 are substantially identical in cross section with each member being of a selected length and having its ends mitered as at 29 to provide neat-appearing, closefitting corners which are interconnected as in the manner hereinafter described.

The primary component of each frame member is an extruded, elongated base channel 30 which is shaped as a comparatively wide web plate 31 having an upstanding flange 32 at each side thereof. The web plates 31 of the frame members form the outer faces of the top, bottom, and ends of the sign frame 21, while the flanges 32 are directed inwardly to define in combination with the web plates and other elements, hereinafter described, a conduit-like wire-way space 33 within and about the sign frame which is ample to retain wiring, ballast, not shown, and base receptacles tfOI lamps L.

With the use of an extruded construction, all components of each base channel member will extend longitudinally with respect to the member and will lie in spaced parallelism with a longitudinal axis of the member. Also, each flange 32, upstanding from the web plate 31, lies in spaced parallelism with and in opposition to the other. Each flange is formed with an intermediate inwardly-extending overhang 34, an inwardly-extending shelf 35 at its edge opposite the plate 31, and a narrow ledge 36 at its outer side formed by inwardly offsetting the flangewall portion above the intermediate overhang opposite the plate 31. The surface of each overhang, shelf and ledge also lies in spaced parallelism with the surfaces of the web plate 31. The spacing between the plate 31 and. the overhangs 34 is used to receive and hold end locking, corner brackets 37, the shelves 35 are used to support an. interior cover 38 which encloses the wireway space 33- and the ledges 36 are used to position and support the: facing retainers 39, all as hereinafter further described.v

To complete the base channel 30, a series of longitudi-- nally disposed rectangular-sectioned ridges or flutes 40 may be formed at each outer surface of the channel, that is, on the plate 31 and the flanges 32, with the flutes 40 being preferably adjacent to the channel corners as illus-- trated. These flutes 40 are not only decorative, but they' function as wear surfaces and as gripping surfaces if necessary.

With the arrangement above described, each base chan-- nel is sufficiently rigid in and of itself to form the pri-' mary component of each frame member 26, 27 and 28,. and the only preparation necessary for the forming of a sign frame is to miter, as at 29, the corners of the selected base channels forming the frame members as hereinbefore mentioned. When properly mitered, each frame member abuts against its adjacent members in perpendicular relationship, and the members are held together by the corner brackets 37. Each corner bracket is a comparatively heavy, channel-shaped member having two sets, or legs, of interconnected components at right angles to each other. This includes flat outer plates 41 and 41 and flanges 42 and 42' at each side of the respective outer plates. The width of the plates 41 and 41' and the height of the flanges 42 and 42', from the respective plates, is such as to provide a snug sliding fit, or even a light press fit, of each leg of the bracket into an end of a base channel 30, with the outer plate 41, or 41', lying against the channel web plate 31 and the flanges 42, or 42, lying against the flanges 32 and also fitting tightly against the undersurface of the overhangs 34 as in the manner clearly illustrated at FIGS. 5 and 6.

To permanently secure the frame members in place on the corner brackets 37, registering sets of holes 43 are drilled into the plate portions of the members, as illustrated at FIG. 7, to receive assembly bolts 44. It is to be noted that the bolts 44 at each corner are located at the heaviest and strongest part of the frame because of the positioning of the corner brackets therein. It follows that means for securing and supporting the sign itself, such as the clip angles 23, can be conveniently secured to the sign by these bolts 44 and that no other attachment means will be necessary to hold the sign except in the case of unusually large signs.

The interior cover 38 is a longitudinally extended member lying upon the shelves 35 of the base channel 30 to which it is attached. It is preferably hat-shaped in section with the components forming the cover lying in spaced parallelism with a longitudinal axis thereof. This cover 38 is preferably formed of a folded strip of sheet metal, and includes an outwardly turned base flange 45 at each edge, a sidewall 46 upstanding from the inner edge of each base flange and a raised lid section 47 extending between the sidewalls. To form a continuation of the base channel 30 whereon a cover 38 is mounted, its ends may be suitably mitered as at 48, FIG. 7. To mount this cover 38 upon the base channel 30, the

base flanges 45 are set in position upon the shelves 35 of the base channel and secured thereto by an array of screws 49, which are preferably of a self-tapping type to speed assembly of the sign unit.

Actually, this hat-section cover 38 is not essential except at those members of the frame 21 which hold wire, ballast, and light receptacles. However, it is preferred on -all members in large signs since the cover 38 formed as above described will materially rigidify and increase the strength of each of the members forming the sign frame.

At those sections where light receptacles are to be positioned to hold lights properly located, receptacle-retaining orifices 50 may be provided in the lid 47 of the cover, as in the manner illustrated at FIG. 6.

The facing retainers 39 may be described as being of a ZF shape, and as positioned in the drawing of a lazy 'ZF shape. These retainers are extruded members with all components lying in spaced parallelism with a longitudinal axis thereof. A typical retainer member includes,

'referring to the position illustrated at FIGS. 5 and 8, a

' an outer wall 54 which is at the outer edge of the floor section.

A pair of retainers 39 are needed for each frame member of the sign, and each is affixed in position upon the ledge of its base channel by connecting screws 55, preferably of the self-tapping type. The ends of the retainers are miter cut as at 29a, FIG. 7, to fit the mitered ends 29 V of the channels 30.

The spacing between the walls 53 and 54 of a retainer 39 is such as to loosely receive the edge of a facing sheet '22 and when using plastic facings, this loose fit is essential because of the variations of thickness of the material,

and especially when it is molded to form dish-shaped, offset faces such as illustrated at FIG. 1. Also, a loose fit of the facing in the retainers may be desirable to allow for expansion and contraction of the plastic material.

This introduces a problem of water control to prevent the interior of the sign from becoming wet as during a rainstorm. For this reason, the walls 53 and 54 are formed in a unique manner with the inner wall 53 being 'higher than the outer wall 54 as indicated at h at FIG.

8. Conventional weep holes 56 are also drilled in the floor 52 of the retainer on the bottom frame member 27 to permit water to drain from the channel spacing be- "tween the Walls 53 and 54. However, whenever a sign is exposed to heavy wind and rainstorms, the amount of water which may be washed down 21 facing will far exceed the capacity of any group of weep holes. Ingress of water into the sign is then prevented by the raised inner wall, for water will flow over the edge of the outer wall 53 to drop from the sign. With this arrangement, it is immediately apparent that this extruded sign framework construction is inherently waterproof, and that the only places necessary to seal the unit will be at the mitered corners of the frame members. This is easily accomplished with small amounts of waterproofing material such as Glyptal which may be applied to the mitered corners 29 as at 57 at FIG. 6.

To finish this retainer unit 39, a fluted facade 58 may be formed at the outer sides of the mounting flange 51 and the outer side of the wall 54 as in the manner best illustrated at FIGS. 6, 7, and 8. This ornamentation has no particular function and is entirely optional.

Since several types of sign facing materials exist, re quiring several alternate types of facing retainers, such as those illustrated at FIGS. 9 and 10, the modified retainer 39', illustrated at FIG. 9, is formed substantially the same as that hereinbefore described but with a wider floor section 52' to space the inner wall 53 and outer wall 54 further apart. This retainer is especially adapted for the use of dimpled or corrugated facings such as facing 59. The modified retainer 39", illustrated at FIG. 10, is also similar to that hereinbefore described but with an even wider floor section 52" to space the inner walls 53" and outer wall 54" still further apart. This type of retainer is especially adapted for the use of deeply corrugated or configurated facings such as 60.

The alternate sign 20a illustrated at FIGS. 2 and 11-14 is of a more simplified construction which is especially adapted for smaller signs than the construction heretofore described. The frame 61 is illustrated as supporting a flat type facing 62; however, this is for illustrative purposes only for any type or style of facing may be used especially with the several styles of retainers 39 availabl as hereinbefore described.

This sign 20a is illustrated as being mounted upon a post P to outstand or be cantilevered therefrom, and it may be aflixed to the post by clip angles 63 at its top and bottom corners. The sign interior is also lighted, and the power supply line 64 may extend into the sign at any convenient position as illustrated.

The frame 61 includes a top member 66, a bottom member 67, and end members 68 substantially as hereinbefore described, and with the ends of the members being joined at the sign corners with neat fitting mitre joints 69 as illustrated.

The primary component of each frame member is a base channel 70 which is similar to, but more simple in design than the design of the channel 30 hereinbefore described. It includes only a web plate 71 having flat flnages 72 at each side thereof and inturned shelves 75 at the outer edges of the flanges which are opposing the web plate 71. A modified corner bracket 77, hereinafter described, holds these channel sections 70 together; however, the same hat-section cover 38 and the same facing retainer strips 39, hereinbefore described, are used in the assembly of this unit. Also, in view of the desire for simplicity, this base channel 70 is formed without flutes or like surface ornamentation.

As in the unit hereinbefore described, the corner bracket 77 comprises two similar legs formed by a pair of plates 81 and 81', and a pair of flanges 82 and 82 on each respective plate. Also, each flange preferably includes an inturned edge 82a, and 82a respectively, FIG. 14, to providefor a better fit of the bracket leg into an end of a channel section 70. When fitted, as illustrated at FIG. 13, the plates 81, or 81', lie against the channel web plate 71, and the flanges 82, or 82', lie against the flanges 72 with the inturned edges 82a, or 82a, contacting the undersurface of the inturned shelves 75. To secure the bracket in place, registering drill holes 43 are drilled into the web plates 71 and the faces 81 as illustrated at FIG. 14, to receive assembly bolts 44 as illustrated at FIGS. 12 and 13.

Assembly of this sign frame is manifest from the drawing and involves first, locking the members into position on the corner brackets. The next step involves placing the hat-section covers 38 upon the inturned flange shelves 75 of the members and securing them thereon 7 as by mounting screws 49. The final operation is to place facing retainer strips 39 about the sign and bolting them in place as with mounting screws 55. It is to be noted that the fitting of the retainer strips 39 upon the sides of the channel 70 must be done with more care than the fitting of the strips upon the channel 30 as hereinbefore described because on channel 70, there is no ledge at the outer side of the channel to facilitate placing the strips properly.

The modified sign 20b illustrated at FIGS. 3, 15, and 16 is formed upon a frame 61b similar to the simplified frame 61 hereinbefore described; however, this sign frame includes a series of dividers or mullions 90 which are adapted to hold a group of modular sized facings 9.2 in place. This frame 61b is illustrated as being mounted in a vertical position as upon brackets 91 outstanding from a wall W with a power supply 94 extending through the wall and into the sign.

The frame members of the sign 20b are illustrated as being channels 70 although the base channels 30 could also be used, for the mullions 90 are mounted upon the facing retainers 39 at appropriate spacings to form the regular series of openings for the modular facings.

Each mullion strip '90 is roughly in the form of a T-shaped member with each side of the flange of the T being formed by a pair of walls, an inner wall 93 and outer wall 94, FIG. 16, and with the spacing between these walls corresponding with the spacing between the retainer strip walls 53 and 54 respectively. It is to be noted that each inner wall 93 extends beyond its outer wall 94 in the same manner as does the inner wall 53 extend above the outer wall 54 of the retainer strips,

and in this way an automatic water-draining arrangement is set up to function whenever a mullion strip forms the base of a modular facing section as in the manner illustrated at FIGS. 3 and 15.

The leg 95 of this T-shaped mullion 29 extends inwardly into the body of the sign as illustrated at FIGS. 15 and 16 to serve as a reinforcing member and as a connective means for holding the mullion 90 in place. The mounting of this mullion may be accomplished in various different ways, one mode thereof being illustrated :at FIG. 16 where a mounting post 96 upstands from a flange shelf 75 to overhang the floor of the retainer strip and to extend a short distance'a-bove the inner Wall 53. This post includes suitable side-flanges 97 at its base which :are conveniently secured to the shelf 75 as by screws 98. The leg 95 of the mullion extends between a slot 99 in this mounting post and suitable registered holes are drilled through the sides of the post and the leg 95 to receive a rivet 100. It is to be noted that the fitting of an end of the mullion upon the edge of the wall members 53 and 554 of the retainer strip 39 involves shaping of one of the members, for the difference in the height of the members prevents the fitting .of a square-cut end of the mullion. Therefore, a notch 101 or an equivalent cut to accomplish fitting of an end of the mullion against the edges of the retainer strip will be necessary. Also the flange 45 of hat section 38 is suitably notched as at 102 to provide clearance for the base of the post 96.

It is apparent that many variations of sign construction can be devised by use and assembly of the extruded components as herein described. For example, the description relates ,to the assembly of rectangular signs; however, through modification of the corner brackets 37 or 77, a sign of a different polygonal shape can be easily built. Therefore, while I have described my improved sign frame construction in considerable detail, it is obvious that others skilled in the art can devise and build alternate and equivalent constructions which are nevertheless within the spirit and scope of my invention. Hence, I desire that my protection be limited, not by the constructions herein illustrated and described, but only by the proper scope of the ppended claims.

I claim:

1. In an internally lighted sign having a pair of spaced apart translucent display faces with illuminating means disposed therebetween and electrical means energizable to operate said illuminating means to transmit light through said display faces, the improvement comprising:

spaced parallel upper and lower frame members respectively defining the upper and lower edges of said sign;

spaced parallel side frame members extending between said upper and lower frame members and thus defining the side edges of said sign;

each of said frame members having its opposed end edges mitered to permit all of said frame members to be assembled into a polygonal configuration having corners Where two mitered end edges abut one another; and

corner bracket means at each of said corners to interconnect the angularly disposed frame members whose end edges define said corners; each of said frame members including an elongated integrally formed channel member and elongated integrally formed display face retaining means removably secured to said channel member;

each of said channel members including a web plate extending transversely between said spaced apart display faces and being substantially perpendicular to the plane of said display faces;

flange means projecting perpendicularly from the side edges of said web plate and thus being substantially parallel to the plane of said display faces;

each of said flange means including an inwardly extending web projecting laterally therefrom toward the opposite flange means;

said webs being substantially parallel to and spaced away from said web plate to thus define a slot into which said'corner bracket means extends; 4

said face retaining means including a flat portion having a first flange projecting perpendicularly downward from one side edge thereof, a second flange projecting perpendicularly upward from the opposite side edge thereof and a third flange projecting perpendicularly upward therefrom in spaced parallel relation to said second flange; 4 I

said second and third flanges defining therebetween a recess which receives and retains an edge of one of said display faces; said first flange being juxtaposed to and iemovably secured tothe outer surface of said flange means;

said corner bracket means each including a pair of perpendicularly interconnected legs, each of which has a width substantially equal to the distance between said flange means and a height substantially equal to the distance between said webs and said Web plate; said corner bracket means thus having one leg thereof insertable in its defined slot in one channel member and having its other leg insertable in its defined slot in the angularly disposed channel member which forms a corner with said one channel member;

one of said corner bracket means having its legs thus inserted at each of said corners whereby all of said frame members are thus interconnected and assembled into said polygonal configuration.

2. The improvement defined in claim 1 wherein said flange means each further includes an inwardly extending ledge in spaced parallel relation above said Web thereon and wherein said improvement further includes enclosing member means spanning each of said channel members and seating upon said ledges extending from opposite sides of each channel member, said enclosing member means serving to retain said electrical means and to support said illuminating means.

3. The improvement defined in claim 1 wherein said face retaining means third flanges are higher than said face retaining means second flanges to thus prevent any water flow across said display faces from entering into the interior of said sign.

4. The improvement defined in claim 1 wherein each of said flange means further includes a shoulder means extending continuously therealong and wherein said first flange means lower edge rests upon said shoulder means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Himrnel 18936 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain.

References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,260,744 10/1941 Ganoung.

EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner.

15 LAWRENCE CHARLES, JEROME SCHNALL,

Examiners.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3390259 *Feb 7, 1966Jun 25, 1968Marshall Youngman SIlluminated sign
US3391481 *Jan 29, 1965Jul 9, 1968Heath & Company Inc WStructure for signs, decorative panels and the like and preformed interfitting elements for forming the structure
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US3835613 *Mar 26, 1973Sep 17, 1974Carter Waters CorpSign frame assembly
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EP0106574A1 *Sep 22, 1983Apr 25, 1984Ford Motor Company LimitedImprovements in display signs
WO1989002637A1 *Sep 9, 1988Mar 23, 1989Gudni ErlendssonIlluminated signboard
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/549
International ClassificationG09F13/04
Cooperative ClassificationG09F13/0413
European ClassificationG09F13/04D