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Publication numberUS3237321 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1966
Filing dateMar 24, 1965
Priority dateMar 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3237321 A, US 3237321A, US-A-3237321, US3237321 A, US3237321A
InventorsWilliam Mckinley
Original AssigneeWilliam Mckinley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Turnable shoe heels
US 3237321 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1, 1966 w. Mc 3,237,321

TURNABLE SHOE HEELS Filed March 24, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 4 William Na Kinley BY fiy Q4447 ATTURN Y March 1, 1966 w, McK NLEy 3,237,321

TURNABLE SHOE HEELS Filed March 24, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR William Me. Kin/6y A 7TURNEY5.

United States Patent 3,237,321 TURNABLE SHOE HEELS William McKinley, 1402 Ave. P, Brooklyn, N.Y. Filed Mar. 24, 1965, Ser. No. 442,273 2 Claims. (Cl. 3639) This invention relates generally to rubber heels and more particularly to a reversible rubber heel and this invention is an improvement over the rubber heels shown in my Letters Patents Nos. 3,087,264 and 3,087,265.

The invention broadly comprises a rubber heel assembly made of rubber, plastic, fiber or composition material. The body of the heel is provided with a cutout portion for receiving a rotatable rubber ring which is secured in place on an upstanding cylindrical core formed on the body in the center of the cutout portion, the ring and core having interfitting parts for holding the ring in place. The opposed surfaces of the parts of the assembly are so formed that different surfaces may be used for different seasons of the year.

According to a modification of the invention the body of the heel has a stretchable portion adapted to snugly and removably embrace the outer periphery of the ring.

An object of the present invention is to provide a rubber heel assembly with a body having a cutout portion and a rotatable ring in the cutout portion, with V-shaped groove and ridge means for releasably holding the ring in place,

Another object of the invention is to provide a reversible rubber heel assembly with a smooth surface on one face and a corrugated surface on the opposite face so that the assembly may be effectively used in different seasons of the year.

A further object of the invention is to provide a rubber heel assembly with a body having a rotatable ring so that as the ring wears a fresh portion thereof may be disposed at the point of greatest wear and impact of the heel.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a rubber heel assembly with a body having a rotatable ring, the body having a portion stretchable over the outer periphery of the ring.

For further comprehension of the invention and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of a portion of a shoe with a rubber heel assembly embodying the invention mounted thereon,

FIG. 2 is an enlarged bottom plan view of the heel assembly of FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the components of the rubber heel assembly of FIG. 1,

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3,

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 5,

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing the ring in moved position,

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6 showing a step in the insertion of the ring,

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of FIG. 7,

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 7 showing the ring in completely inserted position,

FIG. 10 is a bottom perspective view of the ring,

FIG. 11 is a view similar to FIG. 2 of a rubber heel assembly embodying a modified form of the invention,

FIG, 12 is a spread perspective view of the assembly of FIG. 11,

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. 2 of a rubber heel assembly embodying a further modified form of the invention,

FIG. 14 is a view similar to FIG. 2 of a rubber heel assembly embodying yet another modified form of the in.- vention, on a reduced scale,

FIG. 15 is a similar view of a rubber heel assembly embodying a still further modified form of the invention, and

FIG. 16 is a similar view of a rubber heel assembly embodying still another modified form of the invention.

Referring now more in detail to the drawings, in FIGS. 1 to 6, inclusive, there is shown a rubber heel assembly 10 embodying one form of the invention mounted on a heel section 12 of a shoe 14. The heel assembly comprises a body portion 16, rectangular in plan, slightly curved at one end as indicated at 20 and is formed with a semi-circular cutaway portion 22 in its top surface at one end thereof, the cutaway portion being closely spaced from the bottom surface 24 of the body as best seen in FIG, 5, leaving a central upwardly projecting cylinder constituting a locking core 26. The floor of the cutaway portion 22 is flat and smooth. The outer surfaces of the body and core are corrugated as indicated at 28 and 30, respectively. The outer periphery of the cylindrical core 26 is formed with an annular V-shaped groove 32. A passage 34 leading from said groove to the center of the core is also formed in the core to receive a headed nail 36 with the head 38 of the nail being seated in the groove. The outer end of the passage may be countersunk to receive the head of the nail.

The rubber heel assembly 10 also includes a removable and rotatable flat solid rubber ring 40, the outer surface of which is corrugated as indicated at 42 and the inner surface is smooth. The inner periphery of the ring tapers inwardly toward the center from both opposed surfaces thereof forming an inwardly projecting annular ridge 44 as best seen in FIG. 4. At spaced intervals therealong, the ridge 44 is formed with notches 46.

In mounting the heel assembly on the heel section 12 of the shoe, the body 16 is secured thereto by nails 48 driven through the body adjacent the curved end thereof and by nails 50 driven through the core 26. The ring 40 is slipped over the core 26 and pressed inward-1y in the cutaway portion 25 of the body as shown by the arrows in FIGS. 7 and 8, with its ridge 44 engaging and snapping under the head of the nail 36 as shown in FIG. 9. The ring 40 is then partially turned until the head 38 of the nail snaps into a notch 46 in the ridge 44 whereby the ring becomes interlocked with the head of the nail as well as with the outer periphery of the core 26. The top surface of the core and ring may be formed with index marks to guide the insertion of the ring into the cutaway portion so that one of its notches 46 will register with the head of the nail.

The rubber heel assembly 10 is readily reversible so that during the winter it may be worn with the corrugated surfaces exposed on the outside, and in the summer it may be worn with the smooth surfaces exposed on the outside.

In FIGS. 11 and 12 a modified form of rubber heel assembly 10 is shown. The assembly 10 differs from assembly 10 in that the cutaway portion 25' of the body 16 is cut through the body, leaving only a strap portion 54 extending around the semi-circular end of the body. In assembly 10, the radial nail 36 of assembly 10 is missing as well as the notches 46 on the ridge and in place thereof a pair of nails 56, 56 are driven from the outer periphery of the ring 40 through the ring and into the core 26' at spaced intervals around the ring. The heads of the nails 56, 56 are preferably cut off.

Furthermore, in assembly 10', the core 26' is mounted directly on the outer surface of the heel section 12 of the shoe and secured thereto by nails 50'.

When the ring 40 is mounted on core 26, the strap portion 54 of the body readily snaps over the outer portion of the outer periphery of the ring as seen in FIG. 11, thereby concealing the nails 56, 56.

The rubber heel assembly 10 is usable and reversible similarly to the rubber heel assembly 10.

The modified form of rubber heel assembly 10" shown in FIG. 13 differs from the assembly 10 of FIG. 11 merely in that the cutaway portion 25" ends adjacent the rear, leaving no continuous strap similar to strap 54 of FIG. 11, and in that the nails 56", 56" have heads which are seated in countersunk recesses 60 in the outer periphery of the ring 40".

In FIGS. 14, 15 and 16, other modified forms of rubber heel assemblies 10", 10a and 10x are shown differing only from the rubber heel assembly 10" of FIG. 13 in the shape of the core. In FIG. 14 the core 26 is octagonal and the inner periphery of the ring 40 is similarly shaped. The core 26a of FIG. 15 is round with a toothed periphery 62 coacting with a similarly toothed inner periphery of the ring 40a. In FIG. 16, the core 26x is cruciform or shaped like a cross and the inner periphery of the ring Mix is similarly shaped.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, What I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A rubber heel assembly for a shoe, comprising a rubber body rectangular in shape having a cutaway portion in the top surface thereof at one end, an upstanding cylindrical integral rubber core member in the center of the cutaway portion, a rotatable rubber ring sleeved around the core, said ring being flush with the body and core and an angular connection between the ring and core for rotatably holding the ring in place, said angular connection constituted by a V-shaped groove in the outer periphery of the core member and a projecting ridge on the inner periphery of the ring, and a radial nail in said core, the head of the nail projecting outwardly of the core and coacting with the projecting ridge on the inner periphery of the ring for holding the ring in place.

2. A rubber heel assembly for a shoe, comprising a rubber body rectangular in shape having a cutaway portion in the top surface thereof at one end, an upstanding cylindrical integral rubber core member in the center of the cutaway portion, a rotatable rubber ring sleeve-d around the core, said ring being flush with the body and core and an angular connection between the ring and core for rotatably holding the ring in place, said angular connection constituted by a V-shaped groove in the outer periphery of the core member and a projecting ridge on the inner periphery of the ring, and a radial nail in said core, the head of the nail projecting outwardly of the core and coacting with the projecting ridge on the inner periphery of the ring for holding the ring in place, said projecting ridge having notches spaced therealong to receive initially the head of the nail in assembling the ring on the core.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,439,758 12/1922 Redman 36-39 1,458,257 6/1923 Van Melle 36-39 2,412,899 12/1946 Margolis 3639 X 2,776,502 1/1957 Taylor 3639 3,087,265 4/1963 McKinley 3635 3,169,328 2/1965 Gilowitz 3639 FRANK I. COHEN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1439758 *Mar 14, 1922Dec 26, 1922Frank RedmanShoe heel
US1458257 *Apr 18, 1922Jun 12, 1923Melle Jean VanRubber heel
US2412899 *Aug 8, 1945Dec 17, 1946Michael MargolisComposite shoe heel
US2776502 *Feb 25, 1954Jan 8, 1957Taylor Leonard LFootwear construction
US3087265 *May 6, 1960Apr 30, 1963William MckinleyInterchangeable turnable heels
US3169328 *Jun 24, 1963Feb 16, 1965Harry LitmanRubber heel with circular adjustable rear section
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4146980 *Jun 7, 1977Apr 3, 1979Evelyn CrossFootwear
US4317295 *Mar 13, 1980Mar 2, 1982Hanson Industries IncorporatedWear resisting member for article of footwear
US5560126 *Aug 17, 1994Oct 1, 1996Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5615497 *Aug 17, 1993Apr 1, 1997Meschan; David F.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5806210 *Oct 12, 1995Sep 15, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US5826352 *Sep 30, 1996Oct 27, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5918384 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 6, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6050002 *May 18, 1999Apr 18, 2000Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6195916Feb 25, 2000Mar 6, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6324772Aug 17, 2000Dec 4, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
WO1995005099A1 *Aug 17, 1994Feb 23, 1995David F MeschanAthletic shoe with improved sole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/39, D02/964, 36/36.00R
International ClassificationA43B21/00, A43B21/433
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/433
European ClassificationA43B21/433