Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3237336 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1966
Filing dateMay 31, 1963
Priority dateMay 31, 1963
Publication numberUS 3237336 A, US 3237336A, US-A-3237336, US3237336 A, US3237336A
InventorsLewis Karl R
Original AssigneeBrowning Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cylinder ratchet mechanism for revolver type firearms
US 3237336 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1, 1966 K. R. LEWIS 3,237,336

CYLINDER RA'ICHET MECHANISM FOR REVOLVER TYPE FIREARMS I Filed May 31, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Q4 l6 15 H FIGZ INVENTOR.

ARL. R. LEWIS fig z ,wnw

March 1, 1966 LEw|5 3,237,336

CYLINDER RATCHET MECHANISM FOR REVOLVER TYPE FIREARMS Filed May 31, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VENTOR.

g ARL RLEWIS United States Patent 0.

3,237,336 CYLINDER RATCHET MECHANISM FOR REVOLVER TYPE FIREARMS Karl R. Lewis, Ogden, Utah, assignor to Browning Industries, Inc., Ogden, Utah, as tenants in common Filed May 31, 1963, Ser. No. 284,444 4 Claims. (CI. 4259) This invention relates to firearms and is more particularly directed to the cylinder ratchet mechanism for firearms of the revolver type.

A revolver type of firearm is a highly specialized piece of mechanism one of whose functions consists of revolving or indexing a cartridge into firing position with the barrel and firing pin. The most common malfunction of any revolver type of firearm is its failuure to index properly or to completely line up the next cartridge into firing position. When such a firearm fails to index properly, it is said to be out of time. This timing is carefully adjusted by filing and fitting the ratchet-hand relationship in high quality revolver type firearms at the factory. If the gun is out of time, the cylinder will not index completely and will fail to line up the next cartridge with the barrel. When the cartridge is fired, the bullet, being slightly out of line with the barrel bore, shaves lead, seriously affecting the accuracy of the firearm. When the firearm gets out of time and the ratchet dogs are worn, the ratchet must be replaced, preferably at the factory. It requires expert workmanship to properly fit and adjust the timing, and the replacement of the ratchet is considerably expensive.

The main object of invention is to provide a ratchet mechanism for a revolver type of firearm that is more durable, having large, easily manufactured ratchet dogs for positive cylinder indexing, to eliminate hand adjusting of the timing and to provide a revolver type of firearm with a ratchet that will not wear out during the life time of the firearm.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a revolver type of firearm with a positive rotating ratchet mechanism that is readily applicable to firearms having any number of cartridge cylinders.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a revolver type of firearm with a positive rotating ratchet mechanism which is produced by simple milling operations permitting tolerances that can be easily controlled and the ratchet mechanism produced and assembled into the firearm eliminating the tedious and cost handfitting of the ratchet-band relationship as is now required to properly adjust the timing of present conventional firearms of the revolver type.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a revolver type of firearm with a cylinder ratchet having a plurality of lugs or dogs so positioned thereon that the cylinder that now is designed for six shots can have its capacity increased to as many as ten shots without increasing the cylinders diameter.

A'further object of the present invention is to provide a cylinder ratchet with lugs or dogs against which a hand abuts in rotating the cylinder to its next firing position, the dogs having an increased area of bearing surfaces thereby increasing the life of the ratchet.

- A still further object of the present invention is to provide a revolver type of firearm with a cylinder ratchet on which a radial groove is formed on the face of the ratchet which allows suflicient clearance between the breech face on the frame and the ratchet whereby the firing pin cannot strike the ratchet regardless of the timing or position of the ratchet at the time the hammer falls.

; A still further object of the present invention is to provide a revolver type of firearm with a cylinder bolt which aligns the rear of the cylinder with the barrel bore of the firearm and this alignment is preserved at all times regardless of wear taking place on the head of the cylinder bolt or in the recess of the frame which receives the head of the cylindrical bolt.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a firearm of the revolver type having a cylinder ratchet mechanism that includes a hand which operates to rotate the cylinder as the trigger is pulled and the hand continues its movement after the cylinder is locked without causing any bind in the mechanism thereby reducing Wear on the various parts to a minimum.

With these and other objects in view, the invention will be best understood from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification, with the understanding, however, that the invention is not confined to any strict conformity with the showing of the drawings but may be changed or modified so long as such changes or modifications mark no material departure from the salient features of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary cross sectional view of a revolver type of firearm embodying my invention with the various parts in their neutral position.

FIGURE 2 is a similar view showing the hammer in its partially cocked position.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1 showing the relative positions of the cylinder ratchet and hand, the latter being in its neutral position, with two cartridges being shown by the dotted lines.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 but with the cylinder omitted and with the hand shown engaging a ratchet dog and having partially rotated the ratchet to the next firing position.

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the ratchet rotated to place the next cartridge in position to be fired thereby properly indexing the ratchet and cylinder.

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing the ratchet in the same position as in FIGURE 5 but with the hand in the position occupied as the cartridge is fired with the trigger still in its cocked position.

FIGURE 7 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of the cylinder ratchet as seen removed from the cylinder.

Referring to the drawings wherein like numerals are used to designate similar parts throughout the several views, the numeral 10 refers to a revolver type of firearm which is largely conventional in construction but including my cylinder and cylinder ratchet mechanism as explained in detail hereinafter.

The firearm 10 comprises a frame 11 with a barrel 12 mounted at one end and a handle 13 at the other end of the frame 11. The frame 11 is provided with the conventional cavity 14 for housing the firing mechanism and an opening 15 in which a cylinder 16 is rotatably mounted. It will be obvious from the portion of the firearm 10 shown by the drawings that it is a handgun, however, this has been done for the purpose of illustration only and it should be understood that the invention is not in any way limited to use in handguns but may be used in any firearm of the revolver type, including revolver type shoulder guns.

Within the cavity 14 is a hammer 17 pivotally mounted as at 13 with a link or stirrup 19 connected as at 20 to.

the hammer 17 at one end with the other end connected to a main spring 21 by a pin 22. The hammer 17 is cocked against the force of the main spring 21 which impels the hammer 17 and its firing pin 24 forwardly about the pivot pin 18 to fire a cartridge 22 shown in a chamber 23 of the cylinder 16. Pivotally mounted by a pivot pin 26 on a forward portion of the hammer 17 is a sear 25.

The lower end of the sear is engaged by a finger 27 of a trigger 28 which is pivotally mounted as at 29 to the frame 11. When the trigger 28 is pivoted, the finger 27 engages the lower end of the sear 25 which pivots slightly on its pivot stud 26 until the upper end of the sear 25 engages the hammer 17 to cause the hammer 17 to pivot toward its cocked position against the spring force 21. At the position where the hammer 17 is fully cocked, the finger 27 will slide past the lower end of the sear 25 out of engagement therewith; the force of the main spring 21 will compel the hammer 17 to pivot on the stud 18 in a forward direction and cause the firing pin 24 to strike and fire the cartridge 22. When the trigger 28 is returned to its neutral position, the finger 27 will engage the lower end of sear 25 and cause the latter to pivot against the force of a spring 30 permitting the finger 27 to slide past the lower end of the sear 25 to the position shown by FIGURE 1.

When the trigger 28 is released, it is returned to its neutral position by a rebound slide 31 slidably mounted in a chamber 32 against a spring 33. A trigger lever 34 connects the trigger 28 and the rebound slide 31 whose outward movement is prevented by a stop 35 mounted in the path of the rebound slide 31 to determine the neutral position of the trigger 28.

In addition to cocking the hammer 17 actuation of the trigger 28 causes the simultaneous operation of a hand 36 and a cylinder stop 37. The hand 36 is pivotally secured at its lower end as at 38 to the trigger 28 with the upper end terminating in a finger portion 39 extending in the direction of the cylinder 16. The hand 36 is biased to compel the finger portion 39 to engage a cylinder ratchet 40 by a spring 41 mounted on a pin 42 and having its arm portions engaged on posts 43 and 44 mounted on the trigger 28 and the hand 36 respectively.

The trigger 28 is provided with a second finger 45 which engages a shoulder 46 on the cylinder stop 37. The latter is pivoted at a slightly elongated opening 47 by a pivot pin 48 secured to the frame 11. The free end 49 of the cylinder stop 37 extends through an opening 50 in the frame 11 and engages one of a plurality of notches 51 formed on the periphery of the cylinder 16. When the trigger 28 is actuated from the neutral position shown in FIGURE 1, the finger 45 abutting against the shoulder 46 will swing downwardly causing the cylinder stop 37 to swing in a counter clockwise direction and the free end 49 to leave the notch 51 on the cylinder 16. The cylinder 16 which is now free to turn is rotated by the hand 36 hearing against the cylinder ratchet 40, as is explained in detail hereinafter, which structure forms the basis of the present invention. A plunger 52 exerts a yielding force against the cylinder stop 37 to rotate the latter in a clockwise direction by virtue of a spring 53. As the trigger is pulled rearwardly, the finger 45 slides along the shoulder 46 of the cylinder stop until immediately prior to the hammer 17 becoming fully cocked, the finger 45 slips past the shoulder 46 and the cylinder stop 37 rotates in a clockwise direction causing the free end 49 to be seated in the notch 51 as the cylinder 16 becomes fully indexed. As stated hereinabove continued pull on the trigger 28 will cock the hammer 17 causing its release in a forward direction to fire the cartridge 22. As the trigger 28 is released, the trigger return spring 33 will cause the trigger 28 to swing back to its neutral position and the finger 45 will abut against the tip of the shoulder 46 of the cylinder lock 37. The force of the trigger rebound spring 33 being stronger than the cylinder stop spring 53 will cause the latter to give and the cylinder stop 37 to slide laterally in the elongated opening 47 and allow the finger 45 to slide past the tip of the shoulder 46 after which the spring 53 will return the cylinder stop 37 to its normal position and the finger 45 to engage the shoulder 46 as shown by FIGURE 1.

The cylinder 16 is provided with a plurality of circumferentia'lly positioned cartridge chambers 23, ten such chambers being shown to illustrate that the present invention permits the accommodation of a relatively large number of cartridges in the cylinder so that a correspondingly large number of shots are permitted with the revolver 10 without reloading although any number of chambers 23 may be utilized.

The cylinder 16 has associated therewith a cylinder bolt 54 slidably received in an axial bore of a cylinder ratchet stem 61. The stem 61 is slidably but non-rotatably positioned in an axial bore 64 of the cylinder. The cylinder bolt 54 is provided with an enlarged diameter forward end portion 55 which is engageable with a peripheral shoulder 56 in the ratchet bore, and is also provided with a semispherical head portion 57 which is received by a corresponding arcuate recess 158 in the frame 11. When the cylinder 16 is closed relative to the frame, as shown in FIG. 1, the engagement of the semispherical head portion 57 with the recess 158 holds the enlarged diameter end portion 55 slightly out of engagement with the shoulder 56. The bolt 54 is also urged rearwardly toward the recess 158 by a coil spring 58 interposed between the bolt 54 and an ejector rod 59. The combination of semispherical head 57 rotatably positioned in the corresponding arcuate recess 158 will therefore maintain the cylinder 16 in its proper axially aligned position in the firearm 10 at all times notwithstanding any wear of the head 57 in the recess 158. It should also be noted from FIG. 1 that the recess 158 is of such a depth as to accommodate only the curved portion of the semispherical head 57 with the result that when a side pressure is applied to the cylinder 15 a camming action occurs between the recess 158 and the semispherical head 57 forcing the bolt 54 forwardly against the action of the spring 58 and partially out of the recess 158 with an accompanying slight sideward movement of the cylinder. That is, the spring 58 in forcing the bolt head 57 into the recess 158 biases the cylinder to the position shown in FIG. 1 and permits it to yieldingly move in either direction laterally of the frame from such position. By applying sufficient side pressure to the cylinder, the bolt head 57 may be moved completely from the recess 158 to free the cylinder for movement to its open position.

The cartridge ejector rod 59 is slidably mounted in a bushing 60 and threaded at its inner end to threads 62 formed in the cylinder ratchet stem 61. A push rod spring 63 mounted in the cylinder axial bore 64 is interposed between the cartridge ejector rod bushing 60 and an end wall 65 of the cylinder bore 64. The cylinder 16 is mounted to rotate out of the opening 15 in the frame by means of a crane 66 pivoted to the frame 11 by a crane pivot member 67. To prevent the relative rotational movements of the ratchet member 40 and the cylinder 16 yet permit the rearward sliding movement of the ratchet 40 to eject the cartridges 22 in the conventional manner, the ratchet stem 40 is provided with longitudinal slots 68 in which tongues 69 are fitted and formed on the cylinder 16 at the axial bore 65.

The cylinder ratchet 40 with its operation in combination with the cylinder 16, which constitute the essence of this invention, consists of a face portion 70 mounted on one end of the stem 61. The face portion 70 fits within a circular slot 71 formed in the end wall 72 of the cylinder 16. A plurality of semi-circular slots 73 which are formed on the periphery of the face portion 70 are aligned with the lower half of the cylindrical cartridge chambers 23 of the cylinder 16. The edge of the caps 74 of the cartridges 22 will lie against the face 70 of the ratchet 40 and the end wall 72 of the cylinder 16 within arcuate slots 75 formed by the edges of dogs 76. Positioned on the face 70 are two groups of dogs 77 and 78 arranged concentrically in circles. The outer dogs 77 are mainly a by-product of the manufacturing process, while the dogs 78 are entirely functional being the dogs which the hand 36 engages for rotating the cylinder 16.

The dogs 76, 77 and 78 are produced by a simple milling operation of three steps, namely: Five radial slots 79 are milled across the face 70 of the ratchet, the slots 79 being centered on the axis of the face 70 and the center of the arcuate slots 73. The edges A and B of the dogs 78 are thus formed. In order to mill the third side C of the dogs 78, the ratchet 40 is placed with one of the semi-circular slots 73 in ver tical alignment with the center axis of the ratchet 40 as shown by FIGURE 3. Knowing the horizontal distance the finger 39 of the hand 36 is from the axis of the cylinder 16 a vertical slot is milled at that distance from the axis of the ratchet 40 alongside the dog 78' to form the edge C of that dog and to separate from it the associated outer dog 77. The ratchet 40 is now rotated 36 to place the adjoining semi-circular slot 73 in vertical alignment with the axis of the ratchet 40 and another vertical slot is milled alongside the next dog 78 to form its third edge C. This operation is continued until all of the dogs 78 have been provided with the third edge C. A circular slot is then milled about the dogs 77 to complete the milling operation of the ratchet 40.

Now, when the trigger 28 is in its neutral, uncooked position as shown by FIGURE 1, the cylinder ratchet will be in the position shown by FIGURE 3. Note that cartridge 122 is in the firing chamber having been discharged by the previous cycle of operation and the finger 39 of the hand 36 engages the face 70 of the ratchet 40 at a position below the dog 78". As the trigger 28 is pulled and begins to pivot rearwardly on its pivot stud 29, the hand 36 slides upwardly until the finger 39 engages the lower surface of the dog 78". Simultaneously therewith, the cylinder lock 37 has pivoted on its pivot stud 48 to swing the free end 49 of the cylinder stop 37 out of the slot 51 to free the cylinder 16 as shown by FIGURE 2. With a further rearward movement of the trigger 28, the hand 36 continues to slide upwardly and the finger 39 pushes against the edge portion A of the dog 78 causing the ratchet 40 and the cylinder 16 to rotate in a counter clockwise direction as shown by FIGURES 4 and 5. As the dog 78" moves upwardly it follows a circular path and moves to the left while the hand 36 slides in a vertical path. When the dog 78" has reached the position shown by FIGURE 5, the finger 39 will be in alignment with the edge portion C of the dog 78 and within the slot between the dog 78" and its associated outer dog 77, and the edge portion A will now be to the left of the finger 39 and out of contact therewith. At this position of the finger 39, the cylinder stop 37 will have pivoted back to the cylinder locked position as shown by FIG- URE 1. Further cocking of the trigger 28 will cause the finger 39 to slide freely and upwardly along the slot between the dogs 78 and 77 of the ratchet 40. With the cylinder 16 in its locked position, the cartridge 22 will be in its aligned position to be fired by the hammer 17. When the trigger 28 has been fully cocked, the hammer 17 will be released and under the force of its spring 21 will fire the cartridge 22, and the finger 39 will have arrived at its highest position in the slot between the dogs 78 and 77 as shown by FIGURE 6.

Upon release of the trigger 28, the hand 36 will slide downwardly with the finger 39 in contact relation with the face 70 of the ratchet 40. The finger 39 will slide downwardly along the slot between the dogs 78 and 77 over the adjacent lower dog 78" and position itself below and in vertical alignment with the latter dog to complete the cycle of operation. At no time is there any bind or undue wear of the finger 39 and the dogs 78 that would normally be caused by the cylinder 16 becoming locked into position while the hand 36 continues to move with the trigger action. Furthermore,- should there be a slight mistiming so that the cylinder 16 is locked by the stop 37 slightly before the finger 39 passes completely beyond the surface A of a dog 78, no jamming or damaging interference of the parts will take place. Instead, the pressure of the finger on the dog will produce a lateral force on the cylinder and move the cylinder slightly in a lateral direction, as hereinbefore explained, to move the surface A out of contact with the finger 39 and to permit the finger to thereafter move upwardly past the surface A. Also, since the hand 36 continues its movement after the cylinder 16 is locked there is no need for accurate adjustments of these parts as in those revolvers wherein the hand must stop its movement simultaneously with the cylinder becoming indexed and locked in position.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A cylinder ratchet for the cylinder of a revolver type firearm wherein the cylinder is rotated about its central axis by a hand which moves in a straight line spaced from and generally transverse to said axis, said ratchet comprising a substantially circular face portion having an axis common with that of said cylinder, and a plurality of dogs on said face portion arranged symmetrically in a circular series about said axis, each of said dogs as viewed looking toward said face having a triangular shape defined by first, second and third edge surfaces, the first edge surface of each dog being parallel to the second edge surface of the immediately following dog and extending generally radially with respect to said axis, and the third edge surface of each dog being located in a plane spaced from said axis by a distance equal to the spacing which exists between said axis and said line of movement of said hand.

2. A cylinder ratchet for the cylinder of a revolver type firearm wherein the cylinder is rotated about its central axis by a hand which moves in a straight line spaced from and generally transverse to said axis, said ratchet comprising a substantially circular face portion having an axis common with that of said cylinder, a plurality of first dogs on said face portion arranged symmetrically in a circular series about said axis, and a plurality of second dogs equal in number to said first dogs arranged symmetrically in a circular series about said axis with each of said second dogs being spaced generally radially outwardly from a respectively associated one of said first dogs, each of said fisrt dogs as viewed looking toward said face having first, second and third edge surfaces, the first edge surface of each first dog being parallel to the second edge surface of the immediately following first dog, and the third edge surface of each first dog being located in a plane spaced from said axis by a distance equal to the spacing which exists 'between said axis and said line of movement of said hand, and each of said second dogs having a first edge surface located in the same plane as the first edge surface of its associated first dog and also having a second edge surface parallel to and spaced from the third edge surface of its associated first dog.

3. In a revolver type firearm, the combination comprising a frame having an opening therein, a cylinder having a central axis mounted on said frame for rotation about said central axis relative to said frame and for movement generally laterally of said frame into and out of said frame opening, said cylinder having a normal position in said frame opening, a ratchet non-rotatably fixed relative to said cylinder and having a generally circular face at one end of said cylinder concentric with said central axis, a hand movable in a straight line past said one end of said cylinder and in one direction of its movement being engageable with said ratchet to rotate said ratchet and cylinder when said cylinder is in its normal position, said ratchet having a central axially extending bore, a

cylinder bolt slidably positioned in said ratchet bore and having one end portion with a generally semispherical head extending beyond said face portion, said frame having an arcuate recess for receiving said generally semispherical head of said cylinder bolt when said cylinder is in its normal position, yielding means urging said cylinder bolt toward engagement with said arcuate frame recess and to accordingly urge said cylinder toward its normal position as the result of camming action occurring between said generally semispherical head and said recess, said ratchet including a plurality of dogs on said face portion arranged symmetrically in a circular series about said central axis, each of said dogs as viewed looking toward said face having a triangular shape defined by first, second and third edge surfaces, the first edge surface of each dog 'being parallel to the second edge surface of the immediately following dog and extending generally radially with respect to said central axis, and the third edge surface of each dog being located in a plane spaced from said central axis by a distance equal to the spacing which exists between said axis and said line of movement of said hand with the result that as said hand is moved in said one direction of its movement it first engages and rotates the first edge surface of one of said dogs until passing the point of intersection of the first and third edge surfaces of said dog, after which it slides along said third edge surface of said dog without rotating the same, cylinder stop means movable into and out of engagement with said cylinder to respectively prevent or permit rotation of said cylinder about its central axis, and means for moving and holding said cylinder stop means out of engagement with said cylinder during the initial portion of the movement of said hand in said one direction of movement to permit rotaion of said cylinder and for returning said cylinder stop means to engagement with said cylinder to prevent further rotation of the same at approximately the same time as said hand reaches the point of intersection of the first and third edge surfaces of the dog which it engages.

4. In a revolver type firearm, the combination comprising a frame having an opening therein, a cylinder having a central axis mounted on said frame for rotation about said central axis relative to said frame and for movement generally laterally of said frame into and out of said frame opening, said cylinder having a normal position in said frame opening, a ratchet non-rotatably fixed relative to said cylinder and having a generally circular face at one end of said cylinder concentric with said central axis, a hand movable in a straight line past said one end of said cylinder and in one direction of its movement being engageable with said ratchet to rotate said ratchet and cylinder when said cylinder is in its normal position, said ratchet having a central axially extending bore, a cylinder bolt slidably positioned in said rachet bore and having one end portion with a generally semispherical head extendig beyond said face portion, said frame having an arcuate recess for receiving said generally semispherical head of said cylinder bolt when said cylinder is in its normal position, yielding means urging said cylinder bolt toward engagement with said arcuate frame recess and to accordingly yieldingly urge said cylinder toward its normal position as the result of camming action occurring between said generally semispherical head and said recess, said ratchet including a plurality of dogs on said face portion arranged symmetrically in a circular series about said central axis, each of said dogs as viewed looking toward said face having first, second and third edge surfaces, the first edge surface of each dog being parallel to the second edge surface of the immediately following dog and extending generally radially with respect to said axis and the third edge surface of each dog being located in a plane spaced from said central axis by a distance equal to the spacing which exists between said axis and said line of movement of said hand with the result that as said hand is moved in said one direction of its movement it first engages and rotates the first edge surface of one of said dogs until passing the point of intersection of its first and third edge surfaces and after which it slides along said third edge surface of said dog without rotating the same, cylinder stop means movable into and out of engagement with said cylinder to respectivcly prevent or permit rotation of said cylinder about its central axis, and means for moving and holding said cylinder stop means out of engagement with said cylinder during the initial portion of the movement of said hand in said one direction of movement to permit rotation of said cylinder and for returning said cylinder stop means to engagement with said cylinder to prevent further rotation of the same at approximately the same time as said hand reaches the point of intersection of the first and third edge surfaces of the dog which it engages.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 469,465 2/ 189 2 Ehbets 4265 517,152 3/1894 Wesson 42-68 X 602,870 4/1898 Owen 42-68 X 1,181,417 5/1916 Wesson 42-68 BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US469465 *Nov 2, 1891Feb 23, 1892 ehbets
US517152 *Mar 27, 1894 Swinging cylinder and trigger-lock foyr revolvers
US602870 *Aug 2, 1897Apr 26, 1898 Revolver
US1181417 *Jan 31, 1916May 2, 1916Smith & WessonRevolver.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3453763 *Jun 30, 1967Jul 8, 1969Aai CorpUnderwater pistol having a rotatable cylindrical magazine
US7536817 *Jul 7, 2008May 26, 2009Leonard StorchNo-skip recocking revolver
US8359777 *Aug 1, 2008Jan 29, 2013Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc.Light weight firing control housing for revolver
US8549782 *Dec 29, 2009Oct 8, 2013Smith & Wesson Corp.Firearm having an indexing mechanism
US8789303Oct 2, 2013Jul 29, 2014Smith & Wesson Corp.Firing pin blocking safety
US8887429Jan 7, 2013Nov 18, 2014Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc.Light-weight firing control housing for revolver
US9080825 *Aug 28, 2014Jul 14, 2015Paul A. TustingRatcheting mechanism for a revolver
US9488432 *Jul 24, 2014Nov 8, 2016Smith & Wesson Corp.Yoke and cylinder retaining mechanism
US9777982Nov 8, 2016Oct 3, 2017Smith & Wesson Corp.Shrouded barrel and sight for revolver
US20090044436 *Aug 1, 2008Feb 19, 2009Zajk Joseph JLight weight firing control housing for revolver
US20090077853 *Jul 7, 2008Mar 26, 2009Leonard Storch"No-skip upon recocking revolver": after decocking, the cylinder does not advance skipping a round when recocked
US20090199450 *Apr 7, 2009Aug 13, 2009Leonard StorchNo-skip recocking revolver pawl retainer
US20100170129 *Dec 29, 2009Jul 8, 2010Smith & Wesson Corp.Firearm having nonmetallic components
US20140331536 *Jul 24, 2014Nov 13, 2014Smith & Wesson Corp.Yoke And Cylinder Retaining Mechanism
US20150047243 *Aug 28, 2014Feb 19, 2015Ironmonger Arms LLCRatcheting Mechanism for a Revolver
EP0039553A2 *Apr 21, 1981Nov 11, 1981STURM, RUGER & COMPANY, INC.Cylinder latch mechanism for revolvers
EP0039553A3 *Apr 21, 1981Mar 17, 1982Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc.Cylinder latch mechanism for revolvers
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/59
International ClassificationF41C3/14, F41C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41C3/14
European ClassificationF41C3/14