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Publication numberUS3237372 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1966
Filing dateMar 5, 1963
Priority dateMar 5, 1963
Publication numberUS 3237372 A, US 3237372A, US-A-3237372, US3237372 A, US3237372A
InventorsHartman James B
Original AssigneeInterstate Bakeries Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bread wrapping machine
US 3237372 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1, 1966 Filed March 5, 1963 J. B. HARTMAN BREAD WRAPPING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 (IIIIIIIIIIIIIII L March 1, 1966 V HARTMAN 3,237,372

BREAD WRAPPING MACHINE Filed March 5, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 j zvenfer 27 itwnes 5' 5y. l m aj 29% W m l; w

March 1, 1966 J HARTMAN 3,237,372

BREAD WRAPPING MACHINE Filed March 5, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Jill/6] 1&7:

United States Patent ()fiice 3,237,372 Patented Mar. 1, 1966 3,237,372 BREAD WRAPPING MACHINE James B. Hartman, Kansas City, Mo., assignor to Interstate Bakeries Corporation, Kansas City, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 5, 1963, Ser. No. 263,044 6 Claims. (Cl. 53-201) The present invention relates to improvements in machines for wrapping sliced loaves of bread and the following description of the invention is offered for public dissemination upon the grant of a patent therefor.

For a good many years, sliced loaves of bread have been packaged for sale in flexible wrappers. A portion of the wrapping material encircles the loaf with the wrapping material overlapping at the bottom of the loaf Where it is interconnected. The material at the ends of the loaf is folded and secured to complete the package about the loaf. Machines for automatically forming such packages about loaves of bread are standard in the industry.

To remove the bread slices, the purchasers usually will break the seals at one end of the wrapper-often resulting in a tearing of the wrapping material. Housewives using only a few slices at a time have had difficulty in reclosing such a package, after it has been once opened, in a manner that would sufficiently protect the remaining slices of bread from dehydration, etc. As a consequence, a demand has developed for a bread package in which one end is not secured by the conventional sealing procedure but which has the material at the end extending loosely with the end being closed by a wire tie or the like. A package of this type really is nothing more than a bag. While preformed bags could be employed, it is deemed more desirable to form the bag directly about the loaf of bread. A package of this type will herein be referred to as a bag-type package as distinguished from a conventional package in which both ends are sealed. While some segments of the total of bread purchasers prefer bag-type packages, the demand therefor is not entirely universal, and some purchasers still prefer the conventional package with both ends sealed.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a modification for standard bread wrapping machines to permit them to be utilized for the manufacture of bagtype packages. This of course prevents the economic loss that would otherwise result from having to discard (or not efiiciently use) otherwise good machines. In addition to the economic saving in not having to purchase a new expensive machine to make bag-type packages, there is the added savings of installation costs, etc. required for a new machine. Furthermore, a duplication of machines requires additional floor space, etc.

A further advantage of the present invention resides in the fact that it enables the existing machines to be used either for the production of bag-type packages or for the production of conventional packages as may be desired. The sales demand of a particular bakery may be such that a portion of its output is in the form of conventional packages while the remainder is in the form of bag-type packages. Using the present invention, the bread-wrap ping machine may be used for a part of the working period to produce conventional packages and then quickly changed to produce bag-type packages for the remainder of the working period. The ability to so keep a machine in production and use it more effectively results in an obvious economic gain.

A further advantage of the present invention resides in the fact that the material at the open end of the bag is delivered from the bread wrapping machine in a form in which it extends away from the end of the loaf, neatly bunched and semi-gathered. This facilitates the functioning of a tying machine to which the loaves are delivered from the bread wrapping machine to apply a wire tie about this extending end and thus produce the finished package. If the extending material becomes at least partially folded, rather than extending, an additional operation will have to be performed before the extending end can be necked to enable the tying machine to apply a tie thereabout.

An additional advantage of the invention is the simplicity of the device for providing conjoint movement of the subframes or individual movement of one, with the other stationary. Ordinarily to achieve this, one would provide two devices; one for the conjoint movement and another for the independent movement. In accordance with the present invention, a substantial part of the components of the device for one movement are employed in the apparatus for achieving the other movement. This is important not only in facilitating the modification of existing machines but simplifies and reduces the cost in the manufacture of new machines.

Further objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a bread wrapping machine of the general type with which the present invention is concerned;

FIGURE 2 is a partial sectional, elevational view approximately as viewed at line 22 of FIGURE 1 and illustrating improvements in conventional machines to achieve the objects and advantages heretofore outlined;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary section as viewed at line 33 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic plan view illustrating the use of the machine in making conventional type packages;

FIGURE 5 is a diagrammatic plan view illustrating the use of the machine in making bag-type packages;

FIGURE 6 is a partial section as viewed at line 6-6 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary section as viewed at line 7-7 of FIGURE 2; and

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of the replacement part for the conventional tucker to be used in making bag-type packages.

Although the following disclosure offered for public dissemination is detailed to ensure adequacy and aid understanding, this is not intended to prejudice that purpose of a patent which is to cover each new inventive concept therein no matter how others may later disguise it by variations in form or additions or further improvements. The claims at the end hereof are intended as the chief aid toward this purpose; as it is these that meet the requirement of pointing out the parts, improvements, or combinations in which the inventive concepts are found.

Representative conventional packaging machine Referring particularly to FIGURE 1, the sliced loaves of bread are fed into the wrapping machine along a conveyor 10. The loaves reach a terminal position illustrated in FIGURE 3. A pusher 11 moves the loaf into the wrapping material 12 which is to define the package thereabout. The loaf is moved up onto a platform 13. As it does so, the depending portion 12a of the wrapping material slides under the loaf, while the upper portion 12b is laid about the top of the loaf. A hold-down arm 14 ensures that the portion 12b of the wrapping material moves smoothly across the top of the loaf.

Referring to FIGURE 3, the wrapping material and the loaf move against a sliding plate 18 and move it to the left. Two side tuckers 16 and 17 (FIGURE 4) commence making the folds in the wrapping material at the ends of the loaf. Upon reaching the terminal position,

pusher 11 retracts and platform 13 pivots to the horizontal position illustrated in dot-dashed lines in FIGURE 3. Pushers 19 are moved by a power driven chain 20. Pushers 19 have arms 21 with cam followers 22. Cam followers 22 contact cam 23 which serves to pivot the pushers 19 outwardly as they move about sprocket 24. Thus pushers 19 move up behind the partially wrapped loaf of bread on raised platform 13 and move it onto conveyor plate 25. As the loaf moves along plate 25, it proceeds between two side guides 26 and 27. Side guides 26 and 27 incorporate means, not shown, to finish the end folds and seal the wrapping material at the ends. As the loaf moves from platform 13 onto conveyor plate 25, the portion 12b of the wrapping material is drawn under the bottom of the loaf where it overlaps with portion 12a. Conveyor plate 25 includes suitable means, not shown, to seal the bottom overlapped portions of the wrapping material. The packaged loaves of bread leave the wrapping machine on a conveyor 28 (FIGURE 1).

One of the numerous refinements in packaging machines of this general type is provision to enable it to be used for loaves of bread of different lengths. For example, during part of its working time, it would be used for packaging loaves of a size customarily sold to the housewife. At another time it would be used to package the substantially longer loaves, customarily purchased by the restaurant and institutional user. To permit this to be done, means are provided to adjust the separation between tucker plates 16 and 17, and also to adjust the distance between side guides 26 and 27. For example, in FIGURE 2, tucker plate 16 is mounted on an arm 31 movable transversely in way 32. A screw 33 having a hand wheel 34 is threadably received in arm 31 to permit the transverse adjustment. Tucker 16 is detachably mounted on arm 31 by spring-loaded mounting clips 35. Similarly tucker 17 is mounted by spring-loaded clips 36 on an adjustable arm 37. The clips 35 and 36 form a mounting for the supported end of the tucker which extends outwardly therefrom to an unsupported end.

Side guides 26 and 27 are aflixed to left and right subframes 38 and 39 respectively. For example, side guide 26 is mounted by means of brackets 40. Provision is made so that subframes 38 and 39 can be adjusted transversely of the path of movement of the loaves of bread. To achieve this, a shaft 41 is suitably journaled in main frame 42. A hand crank 43 is provided on shaft 41 so that it may be rotated. Between the two sides of main frame 42, shaft 41 has two sets of threads of opposite sense. For example, the threads 44 at one side are right hand threads and the threads 45 at the opposite side are left hand threads. I

A nut 46, in generally cylindrical form, is an integral part of a mounting bracket 47 secured to the underside of subframe 39. A corresponding mounting bracket 48 is secured to subframe 38. A stub shaft 51 is secured to subframe 39 as by means of a pin 52. Shaft 51 has a threaded portion 53. The hub of a sprocket 54 is internally threaded to engage threads 53 and thus defines a nut. Sprocket 54 is rotatably mounted on main frame 42 and held against movement in a direction axially of shaft 51 by any suitable means. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, the axial movement is prevented by clips 55 secured to main frame 42 and received in a groove 56 in the hub of sprocket 54. Thus as sprocket 54 is rotated in one direction or the other, shaft 51 will be moved axially to correspondingly move subframe 39. Sprocket 54 is connected by a chain 57 to a sprocket 58 attached to shaft 41. Thus as hand wheel 43 is turned, the common rotation of shaft 41 in nut 46 and the rotation of the nut defined by the hub of sprocket 54 on the threads 53 of shaft 51 will produce an even movement of subframe 39 toward or away from the side of main frame 42 (depending upon the direction of rotation of the hand wheel).

In the present machines, the mechanism for moving subframe 38 corresponds to that described for the movement of subframe 39 except that the threads are reversed so that the two subframes will move toward or away from each other simultaneously. To this end there is a stub shaft 61 having threads 62 and connected to subframe 38. The hub of a sprocket 63 forms a nut engaging thread 62. Sprocket 63 is rotatably connected to main frame 42. Thus, as sprocket 63 is rotated, with shaft 61 being held against rotation, the shaft will be moved axially thereof. Sprocket 63 is connected by a chain 64 to a sprocket 65 secured to shaft 41.

Improvements in packaging machines The following modifications of an existing machine will enable it to be readily employed for producing either conventional packages or the new bag-type packages. One of the subframes is mounted for movement toward and away from the other subframe independently of said other subframe. To this end, shaft 61 is mounted for rotation with respect to subframe 38. A groove 67 is provided in shaft 61. A set screw 68 (or pin) extends into groove 67. Thus, shaft 61 will rotate with respect to subframe 38 but will not move axially with respect thereto. A sprocket 69 is secured to shaft 61. Sprocket 69 is engaged with a chain 70. Chain 70 also engages a sprocket 72 and a sprocket 73. Sprocket '73 is journaled in a mounting bracket 74 and provided with a hand crank 75 by which it may be rotated.

Sprocket 72 is secured to a nut 76 engaging threads 44 of shaft 41. Nut 76 has an annulus 77 secured to the outer race of a ball bearing 78. The inner race of bearing 78 is fitted onto a sleeve 79 and held between an abutment 80 on the sleeve and cylinder 81 of mounting bracket 48. Cylinder 81 was the original nut corresponding to nut 46 of mounting bracket 47. The original threads of the nut that had engaged threads 44 of shaft 41 were bored out :and sleeve 79 fitted therein. Sleeve 79 may be held in place as by means of set screw 82. A set screw 83 may be used to hold annulus 77 to the outer race of bearing 78. As an alternative, the two may be press-fitted together. A set screw 84 secures sprocket 72 on nut 76.

When hand wheel 43 is employed to rotate shaft 41, side frame 39 moves toward or away from side frame 38 in the original manner. At the same time, With nut 76 not rotating, shaft 41 moves the nut 76 and thus bracket 48 toward or away from subframe 39 (depending upon the direction of rotation). Also shaft 41 rotates sprocket 65 which in turn rotates sprocket 63. The hub of sprocket 63 of course engages threads 62 and, with shaft 61 not rotating, shaft 61 is moved axially to move subframe 38 toward or away from subframe 39 (depending upon the direction of rotation). The inter engagement of sprocket 69 (pinned to shaft 61) and sprocket 72 (secured to nut 76) will prevent these two from rotating when crank 63 is operated as aforesaid. A lock on crank 75 could be provided for this purpose but it is not necessary. Thus, in the manner of the original machine, a movement of crank 43 will simultaneously move subframes 38 and 39 toward or away from each other, depending upon the direction of rotation.

The turning of crank 75, with crank 43 remaining stationary, will result in subframe 38 moving toward or away from subframe 39 (with the latter subframe remaining stationary). Thus, as chain 70 rotates sprocket 72, nut 76 is rotated on stationary shaft 41 to produce the desired movement of bracket 48 longitudinally of shaft 41. The same movement of chain 70 rotates sprocket 69 which in turn rotates shaft 61. Thus threads 62 of shaft 61 move in the stationary sprocket 63. Again it is not necessary to provide any sort of a lock to hold crank 43 stationary when moving crank 75, but this could be added if desired.

Using the mounting clips 36, tucker 17 is removed and a replacement part 87 is mounted in its place using the original mounting clips 36. Part 87 is of a configuration to provide support for the end slice of the loaf to hold the loaf together. At the same time, part 87 permits the wrapping material to extend outwardly from the end of the loaf to form the bag. To this end, it has an upper finger 88 and a lower finger 89. As best seen in FIGURE 8, upper finger 88 is relatively narrow in the horizontal dimension and relatively large in the vertical dimension. Conversely, lower finger 89 is relatively narrow in the vertical dimension and larger in the horizontal dimension. The inner faces (the sides 0pposite the viewer in FIGURE 8) of fingers 88 and 89 lie in a common plane. The portion having openings to receive clips 36 is the supported end and the projecting finger ends is the unsupported end of the replacement part.

As is apparent in FIGURE 7, the loaf of bread moving onto platform 13 draws the wrapping material about it. However, at the end projecting toward the viewer, the wrapping material is not folded, as was performed by the tucker 0n the original machine, but rather extends outwardly (at 12c) toward the viewer in the slot or open ing between fingers 88 and 89. Finger 88 catches the outside of the end slice of bread adjacent the top to hold it in place. Finger 89 catches the outer face of the end slice just above the bottom. Thus the slices are prevented from being disarranged. At the same time the two fingers gather the side 120 of the wrapping material and enable that side to define the projecting open end of the ultimate bag. Of course the other end of the bag is closed and sealed in the conventional manner by tucker 16, etc.

To ensure that the material 12c at the end does not become folded in portions and thus make it more diflEicult to ultimately close the bag with a tie or the like, means are provided to fluff the material out and thus prevent any unwanted folding. To this end, a timed air blast is positioned to fluff out the wrapping material at end 12c. A nozzle 92 is positioned so that air issuing therefrom will catch the wrapping material at end 12c. Nozzle 92 is connected by a pipe or hose 93 to a valve 94. Valve 94 communicates with a suitable source of air under pressure 95, as seen in FIGURE 3. Valve 94 is operated by a solenoid 96 connected to a suitable source of electric power and a normally open switch 97. Switch 97 is mounted on platform 13 in a position such that the actuating button 98 thereof will be operated by sliding plate 18 as the latter reaches the position it occupies when the loaf of bread comes to rest on platform 13. Thus when the loaf of bread has moved fully onto platform 13, valve 94 is opened to supply air to nozzle 92. This air blast continues as platform 13 is raised to the dotdashed position of FIGURE 3. The air blast flufis out the end portion 12c of the wrapping material as illustrated in FIGURE 7. As the loaf is moved onto conveyor plate 25 by pushers 19, plate 18 may move away from switch 97 to permit the switch to open.

Upper and lower wire guides 100 and 101 respectively are detachably afiixed to side guide 27 as by means of brackets 102 and bolts 103. The ends of wire guides 100 and 101 are flared outwardly as seen at 104 and 105 in FIGURE 3. Thus as the wrapped loaf is moved onto and along conveyor plate 25 by pushers 19, the open end 12c of the wrapper enters the flared ends 104 and 105 of the guides and proceeds along between the two guides 100 and 101. Guides 100 and 101 hold the opposite end of the loaf and wrapper in contact with side guides 26 so that the latter end is completely folded and sealed in the conventional manner. With end 120 neatly bunched as illustrated in FIGURE 3, the bag thus formed about the bread is in .an ideal condition for the closing of the open end with a wire tie or the like by a suitable machine mounted at the discharge end of the bread wrapping machine.

By removing guides 100 and 101, replacing part 87 with tucker 17 and repositioning one or both of side guides 26 and 27 (by moving one or both of subframes 38 .and 39), the machine can be quickly restored to operation to produce conventional packages. Usually the operator also will disconnect the electric supply to solenoid 96.

The ability to move side guides 26 and 27 independently of each other is important in easily converting from conventional packaging to bag-type packaging and vice versa. For example, it permits (if desired) the use of film from the identical roll to make either type of package. In producing a conventional package, the tuckers, etc, would be positioned so that the loaf of bread was delivered to the wrapping material centered between the two side edges thereof. In producing a bag-type package, the same parts would be adjusted so that the bread was more nearly adjacent the side edge of the wrapping material at the side which was to form the closed end of the package (the top in FIGURE 5). This would provide extra material at the side that was to define the open end of the package thus making the final tying operation more easily performed.

Even when a different roll of wrapping material is used for making the bag-type package than that used for the conventional package, this ability to independently adjust the two sides 26 and 27 will be important to the operator in the bakery. The usual procedure that will be found to be most convenient will be to turn hand wheel 43 until side guide 27 is in the desired position. The movement of hand wheel 43 of course will also move side guide 26. After guide 27 is in the desired position, hand wheel 75 then is rotated to reposition guide 26 in its required position.

I claim:

1. In a machine for wrapping sliced bread in a packaging material and having subframes on each side movably mounted with respect to the main frame and tuckers at each side for commencing the end folds of the wrapping material, the improvement comprising: means to move said subframes toward and away from each other simultaneously and to move one of the subframes toward and away from the other without moving the other; a replacement part for the tucker on one side, said part having a top and bottom support for the end slice on said side and an opening therebetween to allow the wrapping material on said side to extend outwardly through the part; and air blast means to push the material into the opening; whereby said machine may be alternatively employed for forming a conventional bread package closed at both ends or a bag-type package with the material at one end extending outwardly from the loaf.

2. In a machine as set forth in claim 1, wherein said means to move said subframes includes a first shaft ex tending between the two sub-frames and having threads of opposite sense on the two sides thereof, said shaft being rotatably mounted on the main frame; a first nut secured to the other subframe and engaging the threads at one side; a second nut rotatably attached to the one subframe and engaging the threads at the other side; an adjusting device interconnecting the one subframe and the main frame along a line spaced from said shaft and including a threaded shaft member and a nut member engaging the threads of the shaft member, one of said members being rotatably secured to the subframe, the other of said members being rotatably attached to the main frame; means interconnecting the first shaft and the other member to rotate the two in unison; and means interconnecting said second nut and said one member to rotate the two in unison.

3. In a machine as set forth in claim 2, wherein said one member is the shaft member and the other member is the nut member, and each of the last two means includes two sprockets and a. chain interconnecting the sprockets.

4. In a machine as set forth in claim 1, wherein said part includes a top finger positioned to contact the outside of the end slice at the top thereof and a bottom 7 finger positioned to contact said outside of the end slice immediately above the bottom thereof, the space between the fingers being open, said fingers being interconnected at the ends thereof in the direction that the loaf moves as it is moving into the tucker.

5. In a machine for wrapping sliced bread in a packaging material and having subframes on each side movably mounted with respect to the main frame and tuckers at each side for commencing the end folds of the wrapping material, the improvement comprising: means to move said subframes toward and away from each other simultaneously and to move one of the subframes toward and away from the other without moving the other, said means to move said sub-frames including a first shaftextending between the two subframes and having threads of opposite sense on the two sides thereof, said shaft being rotatably mounted on the main frame, a first nut secured to the other subframe and engaging the threads at one side, a second nut rotatably attached to the one subframe and engaging the threads at the other side, an adjusting device interconnecting the one subframe and the main frame along a line spaced from said shaft and including a threaded shaft member and a nut member engaging the threads of the shaft members, one of said members being rotatably secured to the subframe, the other of said members being rotatably attached to the main frame, means interconnecting the first shaft and the other member to rotate the two in unison, and means interconnecting said second nut and said one member to rotate the two in unison; a replacement part for the tucker on one side, said part having a top and bottom support for the end slice on said side and an opening therebetween to allow the wrapping material on said side to extend outwardly through the part, said part including a top finger positioned to contact the outside of the end slice at the top thereof and a bottom finger positioned to contact said outside of the end slice immediately above the bottom thereof, the space between the fingers being open, said fingers being interconnected at the ends thereof in the direction that the loaf moves as it is moving into the tucker; and air blast means to push the material into the opening; whereby said machine may be alternatively employed for forming a conventional bread package closed at both ends or a bag-type package with the material at one end extending outwardly from the loaf.

6. In a machine for wrapping sliced bread in a packaging material and having sub-frames on each side movably mounted with respect to the mainframe and having means to move said subframes toward and away from each other simultaneously and to move one of the subframes toward and away from the other without moving the other, said means com-prising: a first shaft extending between the two subframes and having threads of opposite sense on the two sides thereof, said shaft being rotatably mounted on the main frame; a first nut secured to the other subframe and engaging the threads at one side; a second nut rotatably attached to the one sub-frame and engaging the threads at the other side; an adjusting device interconnecting the one subframe and the main frame along a line spaced from said shaft and including a threaded shaft member and a nut member engaging the threads of the shaft members, one of said members being rotatably secured to the subframe, the other of said members being rotatably attached to the main frame; means interconnecting the first shaft and the other member to rotate the two in unison; and means interconnecting said second nut and said one member torotate the two in unison.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,104,013 7/1914 Staude 93 52 1,953,195 4/1934 Smith et al 53 201 X 2,146,997 2/1939 Smith et al 53 230 3,083,514 4/1963 Smith et al 53 201 FOREIGN PATENTS 785,3"72 10/1957 Great Britain.

TRAVIS S. MCGEHEE, Primary Examiner.

FRANK E. BAILEY, L. S. BOUCHARD, Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1104013 *Mar 21, 1911Jul 21, 1914Edwin Gustave StaudeFolding and gluing machine.
US1953195 *Feb 11, 1932Apr 3, 1934Nat Bread Wrapping Machine ComBread wrapping machine
US2146997 *Aug 17, 1937Feb 14, 1939Package Machinery CoWrapping machine
US3083514 *Oct 5, 1961Apr 2, 1963Battle Creek Packaging MachineWrapper sealing machine for limp polyolefin film wrappers
GB785372A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3766790 *Dec 29, 1971Oct 23, 1973Boeing CoNon-jamming ball screw linear actuator
US4178740 *Jan 23, 1978Dec 18, 1979Package Machinery CompanyWrapping machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/201, 53/228, 74/89.45
International ClassificationB65B25/00, B65B25/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65B25/18
European ClassificationB65B25/18