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Publication numberUS3237550 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1966
Filing dateOct 18, 1963
Priority dateOct 18, 1963
Publication numberUS 3237550 A, US 3237550A, US-A-3237550, US3237550 A, US3237550A
InventorsChristopher Joseph A
Original AssigneeChristopher Joseph A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Extraction package for infusion materials
US 3237550 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Marh 1966 J. A. CHRISTOPHER 3,237,550

EXTRACTION PACKAGE FOR INFUSION MATERIALS Filed Oct. 18, 1963 A INVENTOR. JOSEPH A. CHRISTOPHER BY joy 5 -79 ATTO R NEYS United States Patent 3,237,550 EXTRACTION PACKAGE FOR INFUSION MATERIALS Joseph A. Christopher, General Delivery, Ashtabula, Ohio Filed Oct. 18, 1963, Ser. No. 317,304 1 Claim. (Cl. 99-287) This invention relates generally to the art of packages or containers for infusion commodities, such as tea, coffee, hops, etc., and is directed to a new and improved pervious bag and harness combination.

Tea bags per se are well known and have been used for many years. However, their use has been limited due to numerous inherent disadvantages and shortcomings. One of these disadvantages is that tea bags heretofore available did not provide an acceptable and adequate means of extracting the liquid from the bag. It is common practice for the user to remove the pervious bag from the liquid in a cup and place it in the saucer. Without adequate means to extract the liquid, a certain amount flows from the bag into the saucer. This gives an unsightly appearance but more importantly it drips on the user when the cup is lifted from the saucer. Further, by not extracting the water from the bag completely, the flavor and aroma, etc., of the material in the bag is not fully utilized. Numerous attempts have been made to overcome these disadvantages but none have been completely successful.

The consumption of infusion commodities has been limited for the lack of a pervious bag which allows the infusion process to take place and which provides a simple and elfective means for extracting the liquid from the bag.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a string and pervious bag combination, with the string arranged in a manner so that the user may extract the liquid from the bag easily, quickly, conveniently and neatly, without squirting or splattering the liquid.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pervious bag and string combination that is simple and inexpensive and yet very effective in extracting substantially all of the liquid from the bag thereby to utilize efficiently the flavor, the aroma, and the color from the contents of the bag.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a pervious bag with a flexible string harness arranged therearound so that upon removing the bag from the hot water, different segments of the string may be pulled, thereby extracting the liquid from the bag, carrying with it the flavor, color, and aroma inparted thereto by the contents of the bag.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pervious bag and string combination requiring a length of flexible string only a fraction longer than that used for the conventional tea bag.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pervious bag and string harness combination wherein the advertising card or tag, as found on conventional tea bags, is so arranged with and fastened to the string that it assists in separating the strings so that same may be grasped and pulled easily, thereby extracting the liquid from the bag.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pervious bag and string harness combination requiring no more staples or fastening devices than used on a conventional tea bag.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pervious bag and string harness combination wherein two strands of string extend from the advertising tag or card, around the bag, thereby to promote rotation of the bag.

The invention will be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a new and improved pervious bag and string harness prior to immersion in hot water;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the new and improved pervious bag and harness before it is immersed in the water;

FIG. 3 is a front plan view of the tea bag after the infusion process has taken place and the bag has been lifted from the water;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the new and improved pervious bag and string harness after it has been removed from the hot liquid, and illustrating the compressing action of the string on the bag to extract the water and flavor therefrom.

Like reference characters refer to corresponding elements throughout the drawings.

Referring to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 shows a porous bag generally indicated by 1, to which is attached a string harness indicated generally by 2. The string may be conventional cotton string or of any other material so long as a flexible cord or strand is used. Attached to the string 2 is an advertising card or tag 3 such as found on a conventional tea bag. As shown in the drawings, the string 2 is of a single piece and extends downwardly from one side of the card 3, around the tea bag, and up to the other side of the card 3. The respective free ends being disposed on opposite sides of the card 3 are fastened thereto by a single staple 4. With the string harness, or loop extending downwardly from the card and around the bag, the bag is essentially suspended from the card.

At an intermediate portion of the harness and at the top of the pervious bag, a second fastener or staple 6 extends through the tea bag and slidably fastens the string to opposite sides of the top peripheral portion of the tea bag.

The bag itself may be of a substantially conventional design, consisting of a marginal or peripheral portion 8 and a central cavity or hollow portion 10 containing an infusion commodity, such as tea, for example. The material from which the bag is made may be paper or any suitable porous material that will allow water or any solvent to circulate about the infusion commodity.

The new bag, however, has a notch 12 on the lower peripheral portion of the bag to restrain the string harness from laterally sliding or shifting along the bottom of the bag.

In packaging the new device, the card or tag 3, along with both free ends of the string fastened to the opposite sides thereof, may be folded back upon the tea bag and around the tea bag with one extremity of the string as indicated at 14, being inserted under staple 6. In this manner, staple 6 contains the single strand of cord at three different points along its length. To utilize this packaging technique either one of both of the extremities of the string extends slightly beyond the card or tag.

The two strands of string tend to twist together as the bag is raised and lowered from the liquid. This imparts a rotary movement to the bag which functions to promote the infusion process. With the bag having a rotary movement as well as an up and down movement the circulation of the liquid around the infusion commodity is improved. This two-way or double motion of the bag allows a more eflicient utilization of the infusion commodity.

Referring now to FIG. 3, which illustrates the bag after it has been removed from the hot liqiud, and how tag 3 is tilted or rotated slightly to separate the respective strands of the string 2. Since the string is fibrous in nature and extends into the liquid, the strands tend to stick together. By merely tilting the tag, the string portions are separated and become readily accessible to be grasped by the user. In order to achieve this result, it is necessary that the respective strands of the string be fastened to the tag at a point such that the tag extends between the strings for a substantial distance from the point of fastening. By fastening the string to the tag or card in this manner the card, when tilted or rotated, acts in the nature of a wedge between the strands. After having separated the strands as illustrated in FIGURE 3, the user grasps the respective strands and pulls them in opposite directions.

Upon so pulling the respective strands, either one or both of the strands will slide through the fastener or staple 6 resulting in a shortening or contraction of the portion of the string surrounding the pervious bag. Upon shortening of the string surrounding the bag, the bag is compressed and the liquid therein is extracted therefrom, carrying with it the flavor, color, and aroma of the contents.

It should be noted that the notch 12 in the lower peripheral portion of the pervious bag functions to restrain lateral shifting of the string and retain same substantially in the center of the bag before and during the time when the strings are pulled to compress the bag. By retaining the string substantially in the center of the bag, it is, more effective in extracting the liquid therefrom than if it were to slip closer to one side or the other. Should it slip off all the Way, it would be substantially ineffective in removing the liquid from the bag.

Certain modifications of the invention obviously may be made Without departing from the spirit thereof. Accordingly, the invention is limited only by the scope of the attached claim.

What is claimed is:

A container for infusion commodities comprising a collapsible, pervious container;

a single length of flexible material extending around the container at substantially its midportion with the free coterminous and secured to opposite sides of a tag;

ends of the respective strands being substantially coterminous and secured to opposite sides of a tag;

said strands being secured to said tag at a point near the top thereof; allowing a major portion of the tag to extend between the strands a substantial distance from the point of fastening so that tilting of said tag Will separate said strands, one from the other;

a fastening device slidably securing the respective strands of the flexible material to opposite sides of the top of the pervious container;

said pervious container being provided with a notch in the lower peripheral portion at substantially the midpoint thereof, to receive the flexible material and retain it from lateral shifting;

whereby upon applying a pulling force to those portions of the flexible material between the tag and the fastening device, the flexible material surroundingthe container and received in said notch will slide through the fastening device and compress the collapsible container.

References Cited'by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,466,281 4/1949 Shaw 99-77.1 2,878,927 3/1959 Haley 9977.1 X 2,881,910 4/1959 Murphy 9977.1 2,986,269 5/1961 Goldberg 99-77.1 X

References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,775,347 9/1930 Hirschhorn.

ROBERT E. PULFREY, Primary Examiner.

STANLEY P. FISHER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1775347 *Oct 4, 1929Sep 9, 1930Millie Patent Holding Co IncTea cartridge
US2466281 *Sep 23, 1947Apr 5, 1949Shaw William RTea bag
US2878927 *Apr 2, 1958Mar 24, 1959Oscar W TippettSelf-squeezing tea or coffee bag
US2881910 *Apr 17, 1958Apr 14, 1959Clarence W JonesTea bag
US2986269 *Nov 9, 1959May 30, 1961Ernest GoldbergPackage for tea or other infusion commodities
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3396032 *Oct 9, 1964Aug 6, 1968Harry A. DooleyCompressible infusion device
US3415656 *Sep 9, 1965Dec 10, 1968Philip L. LundgrenCompressible infusion bag
US3517604 *Sep 20, 1968Jun 30, 1970Coors Robert MCombined teapot cover and tea bag holder
US4602557 *Jul 13, 1984Jul 29, 1986John YipLiquid brewing cup
US4659495 *Aug 2, 1985Apr 21, 1987Figliola Vincent NBath product and method for treating bath water
US4680185 *Feb 6, 1986Jul 14, 1987Illk Barbara DInfusion package
US4735810 *Nov 7, 1986Apr 5, 1988Dacal Manuel GCoffee infusion bag
US5091197 *Jun 8, 1990Feb 25, 1992Rosemary FerroTea bag with squeezing device
US5358724 *Mar 13, 1991Oct 25, 1994Raffaele Peter RDouble chamber infusion bag and method of manufacture
US5366741 *Oct 1, 1993Nov 22, 1994Thomas J. Lipton Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Infusion packets
US5552164 *Oct 11, 1994Sep 3, 1996Thomas J. Lipton, Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Infusion package
US5552165 *Nov 7, 1994Sep 3, 1996Thomas J. Lipton Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Infusion package
US5632132 *Jun 1, 1995May 27, 1997Thomas J. Lipton Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Packets and their manufacture
US5674544 *Oct 10, 1991Oct 7, 1997Tidy Tea LimitedCompressible infusion package
US5674545 *Mar 26, 1993Oct 7, 1997Tidy Tea LimitedCompressible packages for infusible substances
US5855938 *Oct 1, 1996Jan 5, 1999Thomas J. Lipton Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Infusion packet
US5863575 *Jun 13, 1996Jan 26, 1999Lipton, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Infusion packets
US5865924 *Feb 26, 1997Feb 2, 1999Thomas J. Lipton Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Heat sealing of thread to a web
US5874149 *Feb 5, 1997Feb 23, 1999Thomas J. Lipton Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc.Heat sealing of thread to a web
US5878550 *Apr 17, 1998Mar 9, 1999Lipton, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Packets and their manufacture
US5882472 *Feb 7, 1997Mar 16, 1999Lipton, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Apparatus for heat sealing of a thread to a web
US5979144 *Jul 3, 1997Nov 9, 1999LiptonPackets and their manufacture
US6460725 *Mar 15, 2000Oct 8, 2002Mighty Leaf TeaContainer lid and methods for beverage preparation and bag retention through lid side wall
US6729494Oct 7, 2002May 4, 2004Mighty Leaf TeaContainer lid and methods for beverage preparation and bag retention through side wall
US7140510May 27, 2004Nov 28, 2006Jill PortmanReduced profile lid for beverage preparation
US7299940Aug 16, 2006Nov 27, 2007Mighty Leaf TeaAlterable profile lid for beverage preparation
US8181817Oct 11, 2002May 22, 2012Mighty Leaf TeaRaised container lid or beverage preparation and beverage bag retention
US8613375Nov 16, 2007Dec 24, 2013Mighty Leaf TeaFull profile lid for beverage preparation
US8651316Apr 24, 2012Feb 18, 2014Mighty Leaf TeaContainer lid configured to prevent tea bag from blocking a drinking aperture related methods
US9126729Feb 8, 2012Sep 8, 2015Heather LavoieLids for positioning, holding and retaining tea bags and the like in disposable and nondisposable cups
US20030057216 *Oct 11, 2002Mar 27, 2003Jill PortmanRaised container LID for beverage bag retention and related preparation methods
US20030170345 *Mar 11, 2002Sep 11, 2003Te Sheng WangStructure of a tea bag
US20040091580 *Apr 16, 2003May 13, 2004Chernov Yuriy D.Infusion bag squeezing assembly
US20040217119 *May 27, 2004Nov 4, 2004Jill PortmanReduced profile lid for beverage preparation
US20050031738 *Aug 5, 2004Feb 10, 2005Christensen Henrik KurtTea bag package
US20060273093 *Aug 16, 2006Dec 7, 2006Jill PortmanAlterable profile lid for beverage preparation
US20080128437 *Nov 16, 2007Jun 5, 2008Jill PortmanFull profile lid for beverage preparation
WO1992006903A1 *Oct 10, 1991Apr 30, 1992Tidy Tea LimitedInfusion package
WO2001034486A1 *Nov 13, 2000May 17, 2001Krumpet International, LlcInfusion bag squeezing assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification99/287, 206/.5, 426/80
International ClassificationB65D85/804, B65D85/812, B65D81/00, A47G21/10, A47G21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/812, A47G21/106
European ClassificationA47G21/10C, B65D85/812