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Publication numberUS3238984 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1966
Filing dateDec 3, 1963
Priority dateDec 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3238984 A, US 3238984A, US-A-3238984, US3238984 A, US3238984A
InventorsMacy Charles F, Shurtleff Stanley J
Original AssigneeMacy Charles F, Shurtleff Stanley J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible canteen
US 3238984 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1966 5. J. SHURTLEFF ETAL 3,233,934

COLLAPS IBLE CANTEEN 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 5. 1963 INVENTORS' STANLEY J. SHURTLEFF CHARLE F. MACY m I]. ATTORNEks March 8, 1966 s. J. SHURTLEFF ETAL 3,238,934

COLLAPSIBLE CANTEEN Filed Dec. 5, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet z FIG.3

FIGS

FIG. 4

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F|G.5 SECTION 5-5 INVENTORS STANLEY J. SHURTLEFF CHARLE F.MACY

United States Patent 3,238,984 COLLAPSIBLE CANTEEN Stanley J. Shurtleif, Cochituate, and Charles F. Macy,

Ashland, Mass, assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army Filed Dec. 3, 1963, Ser. No. 327,850 Claims. (Cl. 159-8) (Granted under Title 35, US. Code (1952), sec. 266) The invention described herein, if patented, may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes without payment to us of any royalty thereon.

This invention relates to a collapsible canteen for water or other fluids. More particularly, the invention relates to a device for improving the capability of a collapsible canteen to be filled by immersion in the fluid with which it is to be filled.

Canteens are a basic item of equipment for members of the armed forces, campers, and other individuals who have occasion to remain away from normal Water supplies for extended periods. The most common type of canteen is a rigid vessel provided with a spout and a removable cap for filling and emptying the canteen. There are, however, situations such as in clandestine military operations behind enemy lines where the normal bulk of a conventional canteen is a distinct disadvantage, primarily because it is difficult to conceal on the person of the user. Collapsible canteens which are capable of assuming substantially flat shapes have been used in such situations and in other cases where the bulk and to a somewhat lesser extent the weight of a conventional rigid canteen are undesirable.

A preferred type of collapsible canteen is comprised of a substantially flat envelope of a flexible fluid-impermeable material provided with a spout and removable cap. Canteens of this construction have been found generally satisfactory but possess a distinct disadvantage when it becomes necessary to fill the canteen by immersing it in a stream or pool of water, a condition which frequently occurs during extended field operations. Due to the flexible nature of the walls of the canteen, the external pressure of the water maintains the sides of the canteen in their collapsed condition such that it is impossible for any appreciable amount of water to enter the canteen without some means of extending the sides of the canteen during filling. While the sides may be extended by the use of both hands, this is an extremely awkward and generally unsatisfactory arrangement since it is then very difficult for the user to properly position the spout of the canteen to admit water. There are also many circumstances where the location of the water may make it diflicult if not impossible for both hands to be employed in extending the sides of the canteen during filling.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to overcome the above-described difficulties in the filling of a collapsible canteen by immersion in a stream or pool of water by providing means within the canteen itself for maintaining the flexible sides in an extended condition during filling.

Another object of the present invention is to provide means for extending the walls of the collapsible canteen during filling thereof by immersion, which means will permit the walls of the canteen to return to their normal substantially flat condition at the option of the user.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a means for filling a collapsible canteen by immersion which is simple to operate and which will not add appreciably to the bulk or weight of the canteen.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide such a device which will be simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

The foregoing objects are achieved in the present invention by the provision of a rotatable spreader means within the canteen which will enable the side walls thereof to be extended at the option of the user when it is desired to fill the canteen by immersion in water or other fluid and which may also be positioned within the canteen to permit the side walls thereof to assume their normal substantially flat condition. A means for locking the spreader means in the various optional positions is also provided.

Referring now to the accompanying drawings wherein one embodiment of the invention is shown and wherein like reference characters designate corresponding par-ts in the several views and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of an empty collapsible canteen in accordance with the present invention wherein the flexible side walls are shown in their normal substantially flat condition;

FIGURE 2 is an end elevation of the collapsible canteen of FIGURE 1 wherein the spreader means have been rotated degrees from the position shown in FIGURE 1 so as to hold the side walls in opened condition and also showing the unopened condition of the side walls in phantom view, the vertical sealed end edge of the envelope being omitted from their view for clarity;

FIGURE 3 is a cross-section of the neck portion of the canteen taken along line 5-3 of FIGURE 1 with the canteen cap removed and spreader means raised to disengage the locking means and then rotated through 90 degrees from the position shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a top view of the neck of the canteen with the collar as shown in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a cross-section of the neck of the canteen taken along line 55 of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 6 is a central vertical cross-section taken along the line 66 of FIGURE 3.

Referring now to FIGURES 1 and 2 of the drawing, the collapsible canteen of the present invention designated generally by reference numeral 10 comprises a flexible envelope 11, a spout or neck assembly 12, a cap assembly 13 and spreader means 14. The flexible envelope 11 is preferably formed from a single sheet of filmimpermeable to the fluid to be stored in the canteen, such as vinyl polymer or laminates thereof with other flexible films. The sheet is provided with a circular opening in the center thereof for the purpose of filling and emptying the envelope when it is assembled. The flexible envelope 1]. is formed by folding the single sheet upon itself along a line passing through the center of the circular opening and joining the three open edges by heat-sealing or otherwise. However, the joining of the open edges is not accomplished until the neck assembly and spreader means are assembled and in place as hereinafter described.

Referring to FIGURES 3 through 5 of the drawing, the spout or neck assembly 12 is comprised of a relatively flexible neck member 15 of rubber or plastic material having an integral generally circular radial flange 16 extending from the inner end thereof, a rigid inner neck liner 1'7 and a rigid outer neck liner 18. The inner neck liner is sized to snugly fit within the neck member over substantially its entire length and is provided with two pairs of diametrically opposed notches 19 in its outer end for a purpose to be described. Each pair of notches is spaced approximately 90 degrees from the other pair of notches. The outer neck liner is sized to be snugly receivable around the exterior of neck member 15 and is provided with an external thread 20 thereon and an integral eyelet 21 for purposes to be described below. The inner and outer neck liners may desirably be made of a molded polymeric material such as nylon, polystyrene, phenol-formaldehyde resins or the like.

The cap assembly 13 comprises a conventional internally threaded canteen cap 22 of molded polymeric material having a gasket therein (not shown) and a [retaining chain 23 fixed thereto.

The spreader means 14 in this embodiment of the in- .vention comprises a relatively stiff, and substantially closed continuous wire loop 24 of predetermined fixed dimensions having a lower portion formed generally in the shape of an ellipse and an upper portion lying in the same plane as the lower portion wherein the free ends of the loop are formed to provide spaced parallel connecting members 25 extending from the lower portion to a tubular collar 26. The upper portion of the spreader means, including the spaced connecting members and the collar, is sized to be receivable and freely rotatable within the neck assembly. The lower portion of the spreader means is substantially larger than the neck opening such that rotation thereof will cause substantial separation of the normally flat sides of the envelope but sufficiently smaller than the interior dimensions of the envelope so as to be easily rotatable therein. In order to permit limited movement of the spreader means longitudinally of the neck assembly, the length of the connecting members is greater than the length of the neck assembly. The wire or other relatively stiff material used to form the spreader means is preferably of a minimum thickness consistent with the degree of stiffness required to maintain separation of the canteen sides when the canteen is immersed in water, while both the wire loop and the connecting members of the spreader means are to be free of any sharp edges or bends which may damage the envelope material.

The collar is provided with an integral circular radial flange 27 at its outer end having a diameter slightly smaller than the outer diameter of neck member 15 so as to be receivable within the outer neck liner 18. A pair of diametrically opposed tabs 28 sized to engage the notches 19 in the inner neck liner 17 are struck from the flange in a vertical plane approximately 90 degrees from the plane of the connecting members of the spreader means and bent downwardly generally parallel to the sides of collar 26.

In the assembly of the canteen the neck member 15 is placed through the hole provided in the center of the unsealed envelope with its radial flange 16 contacting the inside surface of the envelope. An annular reinforcing ring 29 is placed over the neck member on the outside of the envelope and the neck member is joined to the envelope by cementing or heat-sealing together the flange 16, the envelope 11 and the reinforcing ring 29. The inner neck liner 17 is then inserted into the neck until its outer edge is flush with the outer end of the neck member 15 and with one pair of diametrically opposed slots 19 lying in the same vertical plane as the substantially flat sides of the completed envelope. The outer neck liner 18 is then forced down over the exterior of the neck member 15 until the outer end of the outer neck liner extends beyond the outer end of the neck member by a distance approximately equal to the thickness of the flange 27 on the collar 26 of spreader means 14, thereby providing a recess 30 for receiving said flange.

The connecting members of the spreader means 14 are then inserted in the neck assembly 12 from inside the envelope until their free ends extend beyond the outer end of the neck assembly. The free ends of the connecting members are then joined to the inside surface of the collar 26 by welding, soldering or other suitable means in such a manner that the wire loop 24 lies in a vertical plane approximately 90 degrees from the plane of the diametrically opposed tabs 28 on the circular radial flange 27. The open edges of the envelope 11 are then sealed by heat-sealing to complete the assembly of the envelope. The spreader means is then positioned by placing the tabs 28 in register with the pair of notches 19 in the inner neck liner 17 which lie in a vertical plane approximately aasea degrees from the plane of the substantially flat sides of the envelope and seating the flange 27 in the recess 30 provided therefor in the top of the neck assembly. The spreader means thereby assumes a position wherein the empty canteen remains in a substantially flat condition. Finally, the retaining chain 23 is attached to eyelet 21 on the outer neck liner 18 and the cap 22 is screwed in place.

In the use of the present invention, when it is desired to fill the collapsible canteen by immersion in a pool of water, the cap is removed and the spreader means raised to disengage the tabs from the notches as shown in FIG- URE 3, rotated approximately 90 degrees to a position where the elliptical portion of the spreader means causes the normally flat side walls of the envelope to be extended, whereupon the spreader means is again seated in the neck assembly with the tabs engaging the second pair of notches in the inner neck liner. The canteen may then be immersed in water with the use of only one hand holding the canteen in the area of the neck assembly. The relative stiffness of the reinforcing portion of the canteen and the heat-sealed edges thereof together with the expansion of the normally flat side walls by the spreader means will provide a substantial volume within the collapsible canteen even under the influence of external water pressure such that a substantial amount of water may be admitted to the canteen even on the initial immersion of the canteen. Several successive immersions will enable the canteen to be substantially completely filled with water. Where the use of two hands is feasible, one hand may be used to hold the canteen by the neck area as described above and the second hand used to extend the envelope by grasping one of the heat-sealed sides thereof for more rapid filling.

It will be understood that the collapsible canteen of the present invention may be protected by inclosing it in a carrying case made of fabric or other suitable material.

It can be seen therefore that the present invention provides a simple, yet effective, means for holding the flexible side walls of a collapsible canteen apart during the filling of the canteen by immersing it in a stream or pool of water. The spreader means of the present invention serves to overcome the effects of external water pressure which would normally cause the side walls of the flexible envelope portion of the canteen to remain close together to the extent that the canteen could not be filled without great inconvenience. The present invention, therefore, overcomes a serious deficiency in the collapsible canteens of the prior art and provides armed forces personnel, civilian campers, hunters and others with a simple and effective means for filling such canteens by immersion where necessary, all without sacrificing the other desirable characteristics of this type of canteen.

It will be understood that various changes in the details, materials, steps and arrangements of parts, which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A canteen comprising a flexible and collapsible substantially flat envelope of fluid impermeable material, a substantially rigid neck mounted on the periphery of said envelope providing means for filling and emptying same and spreader means rotatably mounted in said neck and extending into said envelope, the portion of said spreader means lying within said envelope comprising a substantially rigid frame of predetermined fixed dimension, said frame being substantially larger than said neck opening and having a configuration which is free of any sharp edges or bends which may cause damage to said envelope, said spreader means having a first position within said envelope wherein said envelope remains substantially flat and being rotatable to a second position wherein the normally flat sides of said envelope are extended by said spreader means to increase the volume inclosed by said envelope.

2. A canteen comprising a flexible and collapsible substantially flat envelope of fluid impermeable material, a substantially rigid neck mounted on the periphery of said envelope providing means for filling and emptying same and substantially rigid spreader means rotatably mounted in said neck and extending into said envelope, said spreader means and said rigid neck being provided with cooperating means engageable to releasably lock said spreader means in a first position within said envelope wherein said envelope remains substantially flat and in a second position within said envelope wherein the normally flat sides of said envelope are extended by said spreader means to increase the volume inclosed by said envelope.

3. A canteen comprising a flexible and collapsible substantially flat envelope of fluid impermeable material, a substantially rigid neck mounted on the periphery of said envelope providing means for filling and emptying same and rotatable spreader means extending into said envelope including a wire frame portion lying within said envelope and formed to define a substantially closed loop substantially larger than said means for filling and emptying said canteen, said wire frame member and said rigid neck being provided with cooperating means engageable to releasably lock said spreader means in a first position within said envelope wherein said envelope remains substantially flat and in a second position within said envelope wherein the normally flat sides of said envelope are extended by said wire frame member to increase the volume inclosed by said envelope.

4. A canteen comprising a flexible and collapsible substantially flat envelope of fluid impermeable material, a substantially rigid neck mounted on the periphery of said envelope with an opening therein for filling and emptying said envelope, a removable cap for closing said neck opening, rotatable spreader means extending into said envelope comprising a wire frame member formed to define a substantially closed loop substantially larger than said neck opening, said neck being provided with a plurality of slots in the inside surface thereof extending to the top of said neck opening, a collar receivable in said neck opening and having a peripheral flange for engaging the top of said neck, connecting means joining said wire frame member to said collar, said connecting means permitting limited movement of said spreader means longitudinally of said neck, said flange on said collar being provided with means engageable with said slots in said neck whereby said spreader means may be releasably locked in at least one position wherein the sidewalls of said envelope remain in substantially flat condition, disengaged from said position and rotated to at least one other position wherein the sidewalls are substantially separated by said spreader means, and releasably locked in said other position.

5. A canteen for storage of fluids comprising a flexible and collapsible envelope formed of fluid impermeable heat scalable material, said envelope having heat sealed seams along at least three sides thereof, a substantially rigid neck fixed to said envelope on the periphery thereof with an opening therein for passage of fluids into and out of the canteen, said neck being provided with a plurality of diametrically opposed slots in the inside surface thereof extending to the top of said neck opening, a removable cap for closing said neck opening, rotatable spreader means within said envelope comprising a wire frame member formed to define a loop substantially larger than said neck opening, a collar receivable in said neck opening and having a peripheral flange for engaging the top of said neck, connecting means joining said wire frame member to said collar, said connecting means permitting limited movement of said spreader means longitudinally of said neck, said flange on said collar being provided with at least one tab engageable with said slots in said neck whereby said spreader means may be releasably locked in at least one position wherein the sidewalls of said envelope remain in substantially flat condition, disengaged from said position and rotated to at least one other position wherein the sidewalls are substantially separated by said spreader means, and releasably locked in said other position.

References Qited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 430,746 6/ 1890 Oatman. 1,051,850 1/ 1913 Sandmark 128344 1,653,393 12/1927 Cox 141390 2,010,994 8/1935 Irmscher 141l14 2,106,635 1/ 1938 Harder 128242 2,133,411 10/1938 Zohe 222-107 X 2,518,145 8/1950 Jenson 222-214 X 2,596,592 5/1952 Parker 222-214 X 2,934,122 4/1960 Lindsey 1 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, GEORGE O. RALSTON,

Examiners.

M. L. MINSK, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US430746 *Mar 19, 1890Jun 24, 1890 Nozzle for bags or pouches
US1051850 *Jun 5, 1911Jan 28, 1913Thomas T SandmarkSurgical appliance.
US1653393 *Aug 23, 1927Dec 20, 1927Cox Joseph DHolder for bags during filling operation
US2010994 *May 8, 1933Aug 13, 1935Millie Patent Holding Co IncBag forming, handling, and filling mechanism
US2106635 *Aug 14, 1936Jan 25, 1938Harder Perry JVeterinarian's instrument
US2133411 *Feb 27, 1934Oct 18, 1938Zohe Ludwig AlvineBaby nurser
US2518145 *Apr 16, 1945Aug 8, 1950Arthur H JensonExpansible dispensing device for containers
US2596592 *Jul 19, 1950May 13, 1952Parker Leonard ASelf-closing paste tube
US2934122 *Jun 13, 1958Apr 26, 1960Lindsey Vurness TGuard for a water bag or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5806719 *Jul 11, 1997Sep 15, 1998Tetra Laval Holdings & Finance, SaFitment based dispensing system for a pouch
US6076968 *Nov 26, 1996Jun 20, 2000The Coca-Cola CompanyEasy open flexible pouch
US6164825 *Dec 4, 1997Dec 26, 2000The Coca-Cola CompanyStable, flexible, easy open pouch
US8783487 *Dec 28, 2012Jul 22, 2014Masaru HojoSilicone resin container
US20130129260 *Nov 9, 2012May 23, 2013Ampac Holdings LlcPouch with rigid handle and supports
US20130256310 *Dec 28, 2012Oct 3, 2013World Create, Inc.Silicone Resin Container
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/95, 383/80, 222/107, 383/35, 141/316
International ClassificationA45F3/20, A45F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45F3/20
European ClassificationA45F3/20