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Publication numberUS3239097 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1966
Filing dateMar 5, 1963
Priority dateMar 5, 1963
Publication numberUS 3239097 A, US 3239097A, US-A-3239097, US3239097 A, US3239097A
InventorsBates John D, Hall William H
Original AssigneeKimberly Clark Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing carton for interfolded tissues
US 3239097 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 8, 1966 J. D. BATES ETAL 3,239,097

DISPENSING CARTON FOR INTERFOLDED TISSUES Filed March 5, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 8, 1966 J. D. BATES ETAL 3,239,097

DISPENSING CARTON FOR INTERFOLDED TISSUES Filed March 5, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 8, 1966 J. D. BATES ETAL DISPENSING CARTON FOR INTERFOLDED TISSUES 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 5, 1965 United States Patent 3,239,097 DISPENSING CARTON FOR INTERFOLDED TISSUES John I). Bates, Appleton, and William H. Hall, Neenah,

Wis., assignors to Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wis., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 5, 1963, Ser. No. 263,054 9 Claims. (Cl. 22148) This invention relates to improvements in tissue dispensing cartons.

The primary object of the invention is to provide improvements in carton dispenser openings of the type employed for the sequential dispensing of interleaved facial tissues or the like.

Another object is to provide an improved dispenser carton the dispenser opening area of which is constricted to a minimum during and after tissue dispensing therethrough, thus protecting the carton contents against entry of dust and foreign objects.

A further object is to provide an improved dispenser opening which insures the application of restrictive forces on tissues dispensed therefrom and thereafter maintains suitable force on a partially withdrawn tissue to prevent objectionable fall-back which is commonly experienced in conventional dispensing cartons, especially after a substantial portion of the stack has been dispensed therefrom.

A further object is to provide an improved dispenser opening which permits a user to tuck back into the carton a partially extracted tissue with resulting substantially complete enclosure of the tissue contents.

A further object is to provide a tissue dispensing carton with a window of flexible sheet stock which completely seals the carton contents prior to use, but which is easily severed along a line of fracture by fingernail pressure to provide an improved dispenser opening.

A further, object is to provide a dispenser opening of flexible material which may readily be drawn apart to provide a transversely enlarged opening for the unitary removal of a partial stack of tissues from the carton interior.

A still further object is to provide a constrictive opening which functions, during dispensing, in a manner substantially to eliminate the objectionable rasping sound of prior art constrictive openings.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent upon examination of the drawings and description, the scope of the invention being defined in the appended claims.

In the drawings, in which like parts are identified by the same reference numerals,

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a tissue carton incorporating the invention,

FIG. 2 shows in plan the underside of the top wall 16 of the carton of FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a carton incorporating an alternate embodiment of the invention,

FIG. 4 shows in plan the under surface of the top wall of the carton of FIG, 3,

FIG. 5 shows in perspective, partially broken away, the carton of FIG. 1 during tissue extraction therefrom,

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view, in plan, of the bottom surface of the top wall of the carton shown in FIGS. 1 and 2,

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the tissue carton embodiment shown in FIG. 1 with a perforated top panel partially removed, and

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the tissue carton embodiment shown in FIG. 3 with a perforated top panel partially removed.

FIG. 1 illustrates a generally rectangular tissue dispensing carton 10 of cardboard sheet stock or the like with the top wall thereof provided with a dispensing opening generically designated 12. As shown, opening 12 is somewhat the configuration of a narrow and truncated ellipse, but various other configurations are contemplated. Opening 12 may be formed during manufacture either by clean cut severance of the carton stock along marginal line 14 and removal of the severed panel, or alternately, as shown in FIG. 7, the opening may be marginally defined in a known manner by a suitable line of perforation 15 for later removal of the panel 17 by a user.

As best shown in FIG. 2, the under side of top Wall 16 has bonded thereto a sheet of flexible material 18 such as light Weight polyethylene film or the like. The bonding, shown at 19, FIG. 2, is applied marginally to encircle opening 12 but is preferably spaced outwardly of the opening margin in cartons provided with a panel-defining line of perforation to prevent bond breakage during removal of the panel. Film 18 is perforated along line 20 extending longitudinally of the medial axis of opening 12 between opposite ends thereof. Preferably, but not necessarily, a strip of opaque material 22, such as ink, is printed over or alongside line of perforation 20 as a visual aid to a user in severing the film such as by running a finger along the perforations.

Film 18 is preferably adhesively bonded at 19 to the under side of the carton top wall 16 while under a slight degree of tension to insure tautness of the film throughout the area of the opening 12. While perforations 20 preferably extend completely through film 18, they comprise sufliciently narrow slits to close up after being formed and thus prevent dust or other foreign material from passing therethrough into the carton interior. That portion of film 18 which bridges opening 12 as shown in FIG. 1 thus serves as a protective window in cartons in which the opening panel has been removed. While opaque film may be used, a clear film permits a potential purchaser to examine the tissue contents of the carton. Since facial tissues and the like are currently sold in a plurality of colors, and in various shades of the same colors, one form of the improved opening permits color matching at the time of purchase.

The opening may easily be prepared for use by pressing down the margins of the perforation defined panel 17, if present, to sever the panel which is then removed. Panel removal in this manner normally results in simultaneous severance of film 18 along the perforation line 20, but the film 18 may thereafter be severed by running a finger along that line from one end of opening 12 to the other. Since that portion of the film which bridges opening 12 is maintained taut by the adhesive bond to the carton top wall, breakage thereof along the line of perforation may be eifected in a surprisingly easy manner. As is well-known, films of polyethylene or the like, when not held taut, are quite difficult to separate along perforation lines provided for that purpose.

An alternate embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 wherein a carton 30 is provided with an opening generically designated 32 which may be formed as above stated either by a clean out along marginal line 34 or as shown in FIG. 8, by a line of perforation 35 outlining a panel 37 to be removed prior to use. As shown in FIG. 4, the under side of top wall 36 has bonded thereto two sheets of ifilm-like material 38 and 40, the inner margins of which overlap medially along the longitudinal axis as shown at 42. As in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2, the overlapped sheets of film stock 38, 40 are bonded marginally of the opening, with sheet 38 being bonded at 44 along the outer side and ends thereof, and sheet 40 being bonded in a like manner as shown at 46, the bonding being effected while the two overlapped sheets are maintained taut. The adhesive -bond may run contiguously of margins of clean cut openings but the areas of bonds 44, 46 are preferably set back somewhat from the margin of the opening in instances in which the carton top wall 36 is provided with an opening-defining line of perforation requiring panel removal to form the opening. It will be noted that the film stock of panels 38, 40, since overlapped in the area 42, does not require breakage of a line of perforation in preparation for use, but instead offers ready access to the carton contents by finger separation of the overlapped portions. The film stock is sufliciently flexible to permit the user to insert a thumb and forefinger between the overlapped margins for removal of either an individual sheet or a plurality of sheets, and thereafter a trailing tissue is partially drawn through the lips formed in the overlapped area 42 which remain in pressure engagement therewith to minimize the opening area and to provide, in commom with the opening of FIGS. 1 and 2, smooth and substantially noiseless tissue extraction.

While the invention is not limited to the employment of a particular type of flexible sheet stock, polyethylene film of a thickness of, for example, one to five mils has been found to function effectively. A suitable adhesive, such as that which serves well to bond plastic sheet stock to paperboard, may be lightly applied to the polyethylene film in the configuration of the marginal areas of the opening by a printing roller or otherwise during high speed carton production. The film may then be roller applied to the inner face surface of the top wall portion in registry with the clean cut or perforation defined opening therein.

Following severance along perforation line 20, FIG. 1, the two adjacent half portions of film 18 continue to bridge opening 12 from one end thereof to the other while remaining reasonably taut and in substantial abutrnent along their severed medially disposed margins. The film half portions may, however, be easily spread transversely of the opening as by users thumb and forefinger while grasping the uppermost sheet of the carton-housed tissue stack, or if desired, for extraction of a portion of the tissue stack housed therein. The dispenser opening is intended for use with stacks of interleaved tissues rather than with C-folded or other non-interleaved stacks of tissues.

Tissue interleaving to form the stack may be accomplished, for example, either by interfolding of tissue panel portions which are lightly interbonded, one to the other, or by interleaving the tissues in Z-configu-ration or otherwise but without interbonding therebetween. As shown in FIG. 5, following severance of the window-like flexible film 18 of the FIG. 1 carton along perforation line 20 throughout the longitudinal length of opening 12, individual. tissues 48 are extracted from the carton housed stack 50 between the half portions of film 18. During extraction, the half portions of film 18 tend to be pulled upwardly into a transversely arced configuration to form a pair of lip-like constricting members, one of which is visible in FIG. 5. After a trailing tissue sheet 52 is partially drawn through the opening during each dispensing operation, marginal portions of the film maintained under tension in contact therewith, contract under tension to minimize the opening area, gripping the trailing interleaved sheet which projects in part above the carton top wall while protecting the carton contents against entry of dust and the like.

In the claims:

1. A form-sustaining tissue dispensing carton of paperboard sheet material having a wall thereof provided with an elongate tissue dispensing opening, and a pair of flexible members, each consisting of thin plastic film of substantially less thickness than said paperboard, bonded to the inner surface of said wall and bridging said opening with margins thereof overlapped along the longitudinal medial axis of said opening to form a pair of lip like constricting members in said opening.

2. A form-sustaining tissue dispensing carton of paperboard sheet material having a wall thereof provided with a tissue dispensing opening having a major and a minor axis, a transparent plastic film bonded to the inner surface of said wall in a position to bridge said opening, said film having a line of weakening extending substantially along the major axis of said opening, and a strip of opaque material printed on said film along said line of weakening as a visual aid to a user in breaking said film along said line of weakening, whereby "a pair of liplike constricting members are formed in said opening.

3. The device of claim 2 wherein said transparent film is polyethylene sheet stock of a thickness range of about one to five mils.

4. In combination, a generally rectangular carton of form-sustaining sheet stock provided in the top wall thereof with a marginally weakened elongate panel adapted for user removal prior to use to provide a tissue dispenser opening, a sheet of flexible film underlying said panel and bonded to the lower surface of said top Wall along a continuous path spaced outwardly of the weakened margins of said panel, said film being provided with a line of fracture extending in substantial registry with the longitudinal axis of said defined panel, said film being adapted for severance along said line of fracture after panel removal to provide a pair of lip-like constricting members in said opening and a stack of interleaved tissues disposed in said carton for dispensing between said constricting members.

5. A form-sustaining tissue dispensing carton of paperboard sheet material having a wall thereof provided with an elongate tissue dispensing opening, and a pair of flexible film-like members bonded to the inner surface of said wall and bridging said opening with margins thereof overlapped along the longitudinal medial axis of said opening to form a pair of lip-like constricting members in said opening, said pair of film-like members each consisting of polyethylene film of a thickness range of about one to five mils.

6. In combination, a generally rectangular carton and a stack of interleaved tissues disposed therein, said carton being comprised of form-sustaining sheet stock provided in the top wall thereof with a marginally weakened elongate panel adapted for user removal prior to use to provide a tissue dispensing opening, and a pair of flexible members comprising thin plastic film underlying said panel and bonded to the inner surface of said wall and bridging said opening to form a pair of lip-like constricting members in said opening with margins thereof overlapped along the longitudinal medial axis of said opening, said members being exposed upon removal of said panel, and said stack of interleaved tissues being disposed in said carton for dispensing between said constricting members.

7. In combination; a carton of relatively rigid, formsustaining paperboard sheet stock having flat, generally rectangular top, bottom, side and end walls; a stack of interleaved tissues disposed therein; said top wall being;

spaced substantial distances inwardly from the sides and ends of said top wall and substantial distances outwardly from the center of said top wall; and a pair of flexible members each consisting of thin plastic film of substantial ly less thickness than said paperboard and bonded to the undersurface of said top wall and bridging said opening longitudinally of said opening to form a pair of lip-like constricting members in said opening with margins of said flexible members extending adjacent each other along the longitudinal medial axis of said opening so as to thereby form an elongate tissue dispensing slot between their margins through which a first tissue may be drawn from said stack and dispensed against the flexing action of the plastic film while said flexible members yieldably grip a succeeding tissue to prevent it from falling back into the carton and to prevent it from being dispensed along with said first tissue by exerting a restraining force on the succeeding tissue.

8. In combination; a carton of relatively rigid, formsustaining paperboard sheet stock having flat, generally rectangular top, bottom, side and end Walls; a stack of interleaved tissues disposed therein; said top wall having lines of perforation therethrough which may be broken so that an elongate panel may be removed by severance along said lines of perforation to provide an elongate opening in the top wall extending longitudinally thereof and including a region extending along the longitudinal medial axis of the top Wall which is exposed by removal of said panel; said lines of perforation and the edges of said opening when said panel is removed being spaced substantial distances inwardly from the sides and ends of the top wall and substantial distances outwardly from the center of said top wall; and a pair of flexible members each consisting of a thin plastic film of substantially less thickness than said paperboard and bonded to the undersurface of said top wall outside of said lines of perforation and the edges of said opening and having margins thereof extending adjacent each other and along the longitudinal medial axis of said top Wall so as to be uncovered by removal of said panel and from a pair of lip-like constricting members and an elongate tissue dispensing slot between the margins of said members through which, when said panel is removed, a first tissue may be drawn from said stack and dispensed against the flexing action of the plastic film while said flexible members yieldably grip a succeeding tissue to prevent it from falling back into the carton and to prevent it from being dispensed along with said first tissue by exerting a restraining force on the succeeding tissue.

9. In combination; a carton of relatively rigid, formsustaining paperboard sheet stock having flat, generally rectangular top, bottom, side and end Walls; a stack of interleaved tissues disposed therein; said top wall being provided with an elongate opening therein extending longitudinally thereof and centrally located in said top wall; the edges of said opening being spaced substantial distances inwardly from the sides and ends of said top Wall and substantial distances outwardly from the center of said top wall; and flexible film material consisting of thin, lightweight plastic which has a thickness substantially less than that of said top wall and underlies said top wall; said film material being bonded to the undersurface of said top wall about edges of said opening so that the film material is held by said undersurtace and spans said opening from end to end; said film material having a pair of margins extending adjacent each other and along and adjacent the longitudinal medial line of said top wall so as to form a tissue dispensing slot which is defined by flexible lip-like adjacent constricting sections of said film material of a substantial width measured from the edges of said opening and through which slot a first tissue may be drawn from said stack and dispensed against the flexing action of the film material with the lip-like sections flexing transversely of said opening and arcing upwardly against their own resiliency from the side edges of said opening under the dispensing force applied to said first tissue while the lip-like sections yieldably grip a succeeding tissue to prevent it from falling back into the carton and to prevent it from being dispensed along with said first tissue by exerting a restraining force on the succeeding tissue.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,598,396 8/1926 Scandore 20645.31 1,752,504 4/1930 PenrOse 20645.31 1,977,687 10/1934 Medofi 22163 2,519,261 8/1950 LOrrance 22 l-63 2,541,933 2/1951 Nail 221--48 2,573,309 10/ 1 Chipkevich 22163 2,606,655 8/1952 Rosen 22148 2,672,233 3/1954 Baxter 22l48 2,730,267 1/1956 Marcalus 221-48 2,826,230 3/1958 Conell 22146 2,890,791 6/1959 Wenzel 221-48 2,965,224 12/ 1960 Harwood 221-63 FOREIGN PATENTS 438,057 11/ 1935 Great Britain.

OTHER REFERENCES Handbook of Plastics: Simonds, Weith, and Bigelow; D. Van Nosstrand Co., Inc., Princeton, N.J.; 2d edition, 1949 (reprinted 1955); pp. 546, 573, and 574; TP 986, A2548, 1949, c 9.

LOUIS I. DEMBO, Primary Examiner.

KENNETH N. LEIMER, RAPHAEL M. LUPO,

Examiners.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3306492 *Aug 22, 1966Feb 28, 1967Kugler EmanuelFlexible plastic bag dispenser
US3369698 *Mar 29, 1966Feb 20, 1968Kimberly Clark CoArrangement for sequential dispensing of multi-ply tissues
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Classifications
U.S. Classification221/48, 206/494, 221/302, 229/123.2, 206/772, 229/125.15, 383/208, 229/125.5, 229/242, 221/155
International ClassificationB65D83/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/0805
European ClassificationB65D83/08B