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Publication numberUS3240497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1966
Filing dateMay 27, 1963
Priority dateMay 27, 1963
Publication numberUS 3240497 A, US 3240497A, US-A-3240497, US3240497 A, US3240497A
InventorsWilliam C Taylor
Original AssigneeWilliam C Taylor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf putter including alignment leveling means and misalignment preventive means
US 3240497 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 15, 1966 w. c. TAYLOR 3,240,497

GOLF PUTTER INCLUDING ALIGNMENT LEVELING MEANS AND MISALIGNMENT PREVENTIVE MEANS Filed May 27, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I? I8 I8 17 F G o 1 INVENTOR.

WILLIAM C. TAYLOR \i/MLM .A TTORNE/S March 15, 1966 w. c. TAYLOR 3,240,497

GOLF PUTTER INCLUDING ALIGNMENT LEVELING MEANS AND MISALIGNMENT PREVENTIVE MEANS Filed May 27, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. WILLIAM C. TAYLOR FIG. 5

United States Patent 3,240,497 GOLF PUTTER INCLUDING ALIGNMENT LEVEL ING MEANS AND MISALIGNMENT PREVEN- TIVE MEANS William C. Taylor, 400 S. Arlington Ave., Reno, Nev. Filed May 27, 1963, Ser. No. 283,221 6 Claims. (Cl. 273163) This invention relates generally to a golf club construction. More particularly this invention relates to a golf club of the putter type used in stroking a golf ball into a hole on a putting green of a golf or practice course.

Still more particularly this invention relates to an improved golf putter construction which includes numerous features specifically designed to improve the effectiveness of the putter for its intended purpose. In this regard, important features embodied in the putter of this construction include means for selectively adjusting both its overall length and its overall wei ht so that the putter may be tailored to meet the wishes and desires of a particular golfer. This feature of selective adjustment of club weight and length is particularly desirable in a putter because it is well known that golfers are extremely critical about the performance of their clubs, and this is particularly true with respect to putters.

Additionally, the putter construction of this invention includes means to insure proper alignment of the club head relative to a ball during a putting stroke and to minimize, so far as possible in the construction of the club itself, the possibility of longitudinal and vertical canting or misalignment of the head relative to the ball being propelled. To this end, the bottom of the putter head is provided with a particular ribbed construction specifically designed to minimize the possibility of longitudinal canting or tilting of the head during a putting stroke. Also, the subject putter includes means for indicating to the golfer when the striking face of the putter head is free of vertical cant or inclination; that is, when the putter head is properly arranged generally upright for the most effective golf stroke to preclude placing overspin or reverse spin on the ball being propelled.

This invention also includes as an important feature thereof the provision in a golf putter of an improved striking face construction which insures effective propelling of a golf ball struck thereby. In this regard, the head of the subject putter preferably is formed with a symmetrical configuration so that, if desired, it may be provided with two striking faces and thereby adapted for use by both right and left handed golfers.

With these general principles of the subject golf club construction in mind, reference is directed to the attached drawings which illustrate a preferred embodiment thereof.

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the subject golf club.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view showing details of construction of the club head and a preferred manner of attaching the same to the club shaft.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the head of the subject club illustrating details of the striking face thereof.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the club head illustrating a preferred embodiment of stroke aligning means positioned on the top thereof.

FIG. 5 is a bottom plan view of the club head illustrating means provided thereon to minimize the possibility of longitudinal canting or misalignment of the club during stroking.

FIG. 6 is an end elevational view of the club head.

FIG. 7 is an isometric view illustrating other details of construction of the subject club head.

From the foregoing it should be understood that objects of this invention include the provision of a golf club, preferably of the putter type, in which the overall length hereof is modifiable or adjustable to suit the needs or 3,240,497 Patented Mar. 15, 1966 desires of a particular golfer; the provision of a golf club, preferably of the putter type, in which the overall weight thereof is modifiable or adjustable to suit the needs or desires of a particular golfer; the provision of a golf club, preferably of the putter type, which includes means to minimize the possibility of vertical and longitudinal canting or misalignment of the club head during a golf stroke; the provision of a golf club, preferably of the putter type, which includes in its construction an improved ball striking face; and the provision of a golf club of the putter type which may be used by either right or left handed golfers.

These and other objects of this invention will become apparent from a review of the following detailed description.

Referring first to FIG. 1, the subject golf club 1 is generally illustrated. In this regard, hereinafter reference will be directed particularly to a golf putter construction but it should be understood that novel features of this invention are not limited to applicability in golf putters alone but have applicability in other types of golf clubs as well.

Putter 1 comprises an elongated shaft 2 which has at its upper end 3 a handle portion to be grasped by a golfer during a putting stroke. The handle construction 3 has been generally shown but it should be understood that any of the numerous types of handle constructions presently employed for golf clubs may be employed with this putter construction if desired. Similarly, the construction of shaft 2 may vary as preferred, may be solid or hollow, and may be formed from any suitable material, such as stainless steel, aluminum, wood, or glass fiber material such as those sold under the trademark Fiberglas, to meet particular requirements.

Secured to the lower end of the shaft 2 is the head 4 of the club. For a purpose to be described more fully hereinafter, the head 4 is secured to the lower end 7 of shaft 2 preferably by means of a separate or discrete shaft insert section 6 interposed between the shaft and a tapered boss 8 which projects from the top surface 9 of the club head.

The club head, as seen in the drawings, preferably is formed separate from the shaft for subsequent attachment thereto will be described.

Opposite the top surface 9 of the club head is a contoured bottom surface 11. Extending between such top and bottom surfaces are a pair of opposite side surfaces 12 and 13 and a pair of opposite end surfaces 14 and 16. Thus, as seeen in the drawings, the club head preferably takes an elongated generally solid hexahedron configuration which is defined generally by the six aforenamed surfaces thereof. In vertical cross-section through the head at a location other than in the area of the boss 8, the head has a generally square configuration.

Preferably all corners and edges of the head are rounded to improve its appearance and to otherwise make the same more effective during use. While the side surfaces 12 and 13 and end surface 16 are generally flat or planar, end surface 14 is generally rounded both vertically and laterally, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4.

Contoured bottom surface 11 is defined by and provided with means to minimize longitudinal misalignment of the club head during putting. ,To this end, the bottom of the head is defined by a series of alternate ribs and valleys, 17 and 18 respectively, which, as best seen in FIG. 5, extend laterally or transversely of the longitudinal direction of the elongated head for the full distance between the opposite side surfaces 12 and 13 thereof. As also seen in FIG. 5, such ribs and valleys are provided alternately along the full longitudinal extent of the bottom of the head. That is, the head bottom surface is defined by alternate ribs and valleys the full extent between the opposite end faces 14 and 16 thereof.

While the exact dimensional relationship between the respective ribs and valleys may be varied from that shown, preferably the valleys comprise the major portion of the bottom of the club head to minimize the area of possible contact of the head with the grass during a putting stroke. While the valleys shown are generally arcuate in longitudinal cross section, other configurations may be employed if desired.

Preferably the grass contacting bottom surface of the club head defined by the spaced ribs 17 is slightly rounded to insure a more effective putting stroke. That is, there is no abrupt or sharp edge between the bottom surface and the side surface of the head which would tend to catch in the grass during a putting stroke. This putter is particularly effective on damp or dewy putting greens. The degree of arcuity of the ribs 17, however, is preferably not exaggerated so that the ribs together combine to define a generally rounded bottom surface which is somewhat flat between the opposite side surfaces 12 and 13, as seen in FIG. 6.

Because the ribs and valleys are alternately formed the full distance between the longitudinally spaced end faces of the club head, the possibility of longitudinal canting or misalignment due to catching of the club head on the grass during putting is minimized. The ribs serve as guides during use. Thus, a more true putting stroke is assured.

While the area of the bottom of the head defined by the ribs may vary, practical limits in which the ribs define 2035% of the total area of the head bottom surface have been found effective. Thus, the area of the bottom of the club defined by the valleys may vary within practical limits in which the valleys may vary within practical limits in which the valleys defined 80-65% of the total area of the bottom surface. A particularly effective head construction has been found to exist when the ribs and valleys define 22% and 78% respectively of the area of the head bottom surface.

A further important feature of this invention resides in the provision of an improved ball striking face on the club head. To this end, means are provided on the head for modifying the striking characteristics of the material from which the head is formed. In this regard, the club head may be cast or machined from various materials, such as aluminum, brass, bronze, or the like. Because many golfters prefer the feel when a club head strikes a ball which cannot be produced by such conventional putter head materials, this invention involves the addition of an insert plate to the head on at least one of the side surfaces thereof. Such insert plate may be produced from various materials, preferably of a hard and rigid nature, such as a hard plastic of the type commercially available under the trade name Formica. Similarly, steel or other hard metal plates could be employed, as could hard stone plates, such as marble. The particular type of plate chosen may vary with the particular wishes of a given golfer and a particular plate may be easily added to the club head construction illustrated to satisfy such wishes.

If the subject putter is designed for use by a right handed golfer, an insert plate 21 of the type described would be provided in the left surface 12 of the head as seen in FIGS. 2, 3 and 7. Similiarly if the putter is designed for use by a left handed golfer, an insert plate 21' would be provided in the right surface 13 of the head as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2.

In this regard, because the head 4 preferably is symmetrical in a longitudinal direction, it is possible to provide the head with a pair of insert plates 21 and 21 on each of the opposite side faces 12 and 13 so that the club is equally adapted for use by both a right or left handed golfer. However, if the insert plate employed is of fairly expensive material, such as marble, the economics of 4. the situation may dictate that a plate be provided on only one surface of the club head.

When properly positioned, the insert plate defines the striking face of the club and, to this end, the plate is secured in a relieved portion 22 in the side surface of the club as seen in FIG. 2. Preferably the depth of the relieved portion is substantially equal to the thickness of the insert plate so that the plate is substantially flush with the portion of the side surface of the head which defines the relieved portion, or so that the plate projects only slightly therebeyond. While the exact configuration of the striking insert plate may vary, it is preferred that the plate conforms to the general configuration of the club head. Thus, in the embodiment illustrated, the plate is of thin, generally rectangular configuration and occupies all of the relieved portion of the side surface of the head as best seen in FIG. 3.

While the plate may be secured to the club head by various arrangements, in the preferred embodiment illustrated, a dove-tail interlock is provided between the edges of the plate and the opposite edges which define the relieved portion 22 in the club head. Thus, a plate may be securely and slidably interfitted with the club head. Note FIGS. 2 and 7. If desired, this snug interfit may be made more secure and the plate made generally irremovable by employing a suitable adhesive, such as an epoxy glue, to maintain the plate in place.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 7, a further important feature of this invention is shown. As noted previously certain golfers prefer a relatively heavy putter while other golfers prefer less weight in a putter. The present putter is designed so as to be adjustable or modifiable with respect to the overall weight thereof. To this end, the head 4 is provided with removable and adjustable weight means, generally designated 25 in FIG. 2, for the purpose described.

To receive weight means 25, the head is provided with a longitudinal bore 26 which extends axially lengthwise into the club head from the end surface 16 thereof. The bore is threaded at least adjacent its outer end to removably receive the adjustable weight means therein. Such Weight means comprises a threaded insert head 27 from the inner face of which an unthreaded pin 28 of reduced diameter projects. The length of pin 28 is dictated by the length of the threaded bore 26 in the club head and preferably the combined length of the pin 28 and the threaded insert head 27 correspond generally with the overall length of the bore 26.

Slidably received on the reduced diameter pin 28 is a cylindrical weight member 29 of any given heavy material. In this regard, and by way of example, lead, bronze or steel may be employed. Preferably weight member 29 has a right circular cylindrical configuration and has an outer diameter which conforms generally to the inner diameter of the bore 26.

A spring member 31 is provided in conjunction with the weight member to urge and hold the weight member in a secure position during use of the putter. In this regard, the spring member 31 preferably is interposed between the insert head 27 and the weight member to thereby urge the weight member against the dead end of the bore 26 when the putter is operatively assembled.

To modify the weight of the club, it is merely necessary to remove the insert head 27 and its attached pin by employing a screw driver or coin in the slot 32 provided therein, slidably remove the weight member 29 from the pin 28, and substitute a heavier or lighter weight therefor as desired. Pro shops on golf courses thus can stock weight members of various magnitudes so that the desires of a particular golfer with respect to overall weight of the putter can be satisfied easily. Thus, simple means is provided to allow a putter of the disclosed type to have its overall weight adjusted or selected within wide limits.

Thus, a golfer dissatisfied with the weight of his club need not buy a new putter but only need modify the weight of his present putter if it is of the type disclosed. Similarly, the stocking by a seller of golf clubs of large numbers of clubs of various weights is also precluded.

A further important feature of this invention resides in the provision of means for adjusting the overall length of the club so that the same may be effectively employed by golfers of various statutes. To this end, the aforementioned shaft insert section 6- is interposed and interconnected between the lower end 7 of the shaft 2 and the boss 8 of the club head 4. It should be apparent from the disclosure made thus far that, if it is desired to increase or shorten the overall effective length of the club shown in FIG. 1, it is merely necessary to separate the shaft insert section 6 from the club head and from the shaft and to substitute therefor a longer or shorter insert section as dictated by the stature of the particular person for whom the club is intended. To permit simple and rapid substitution of an insert section of predetermined length, preferably both ends of the insert section are provided with reduced threaded extensions 35 and 36 designed to be threadedly engaged in threaded bores 37 and 38 provided respectively in the boss 8 of the club head and in the lower end 7 of the shaft. Inser-t sections may be stocked by a seller of golf clubs in any suitable size increments, such as one inch increments, so that a putter of any exact overall length may be readily provided.

This arrangement also may be provided with a selftightening feature which is designed to preclude inadvertent separation of the club head from the shaft during use. To this end, the threads employed on the insert 6 and in the mating bores are of opposite hand from the hand of the golfer by whom the putter is used. By way of example, if the club is designed for use by a right handed golfer, the threads of both ends 35 and 36 of insert section 6 and the bores 37 and 38 in the boss 8 and shaft end 7 are specifically made left hand threads. Thus, each time a ball is stroked with such a club head, the threads of the insert section are urged more tightly into engagement with the threads of bores 37 and 38.

Conversely, if the club is designed for use by a left handed golfer, insert section 6 and bores 37 and 38 are provided with right hand threads to insure the tightening tendency mentioned previously.

With further regard to shaft insert section 6, if it is desired to provide a club which has other than a straight overall shaft construction of the type illustrated in FIG. 1, the insert section may be formed with an angular, curved, or other non-straight configuration. Thus by using such a non-straight shaft insert section, the upper handle portion of the shaft may be laterally offset relative to the club head, rather than in line therewith, if so desired.

A final important feature of this invention resides in the provision of stroke aligning means in conjunction with the head of the club. Such aligning means is provided in the top surface 9 of the club as seen in FIGS. 1, 2, 4 and 7. In the embodiment illustrated, an elongated transparent tube 41 of glass or plastic is received in an elongated recess 42 provided in the top of the club head. Preferably the recess 42 is located centrally between the opposite end faces 14- and 16 of the club head generally in line with the striking center of the head. Thus the tube provides a reference line for proper alignment of the club relative to the ball to be stroked and the hole into which it is desired to place the ball during putting. Recess 42 preferably is arranged generally normal to the plane of the striking face of the putter.

Tube 41 contains a quantity of spirit fluid 44 in which an air bubble 43 is trapped. Together the tube, fluid and bubble define a level which functions in well known manner by means of which the golfer using the club may determine at all times Whether or not the striking face is free of vertical cant of inclination. When the bubble 43 is centrally located in the tube, the proper vertical position of the club striking face is insured.

By proper use of the club, a golfer can determine at the moment of impact whether or not vertical cant has been eliminated. It is preferred that the striking face of the putter be vertically arranged at the moment of impact so that the placing of overspin or reverse spin on the ball by a canted striking face is precluded. With practice, level tube 41 will permit a golfer to make a determination as to whether the striking face is vertical as desired at the moment of impact.

The level tube 41 is maintained in the recess 42 by quantities of any suitable adhesive 45, preferably of the rubber type, which impart a cushioning and shock absorbing effect to the tube during striking of a ball.

Having thus made a full disclosure of this invention, reference is directed to the appended claims for the scope to be awarded thereto.

I claim:

1. A golf putter comprising a generally longitudinally symmetrical head which is formed generally in the shape of a hexahedron having a top surface, a bottom surface, and opposite side and end faces extending between said top and bottom surfaces, at least one of said side faces thereof defining a planar ball striking face: stroke aligning means secured at the top of said head and forming a generally permanent part thereof which is readily visible to a golfer using said putter, said means comprising an elongated spirit level tube secured to said head so that its longitudinal axis extends transversely to the longitudinal axis of said head, said tube axis extending generally normal to said ball striking face approximately centrally of said opposite end faces of said head, said tube having spirit fluid and a movable bubble therein for advising the golfer using said putter when said ball striking face is generally free of vertical cant; said head bottom surface being defined by a plurality of alternate ribs and valleys which extend transversely of said head the full distance between said side faces, said head being formed with said ribs and valleys alternately for the full distance from one end face to the other end face thereof, said ribs and valleys extending generally normal to said ball striking face, said valleys decreasing the area of possible contact of said head with a putting green during a putting stroke to minimize the possibility of longitudinal canting of said head during such stroke, said ribs defining the minor part of said bottom surface so that only a minor portion of such surface may contact the putting green during 2. putting stroke.

2. The putter of claim 1 which includes means removably received in said head for permitting selective adjustment of the overall Weight of said putter.

3. The putter of claim 1 in which said ball striking face is defined by a discrete hard insert plate secured to said head, said plate being formed of a material different from and generally harder than the material of said head.

4. The putter of claim 3 in which said head is provided with a generally rectangular relieved portion of a depth generally equal to the thickness of said insert plate, said insert plate conforming to the configuration of said relieved portion, said insert plate being slidably positioned and retained in said relieved portion generally flush with the portion of said head which defines said relieved portion by dove-tail interlock means formed along corresponding edge portions of said insert plate and said relieved portion.

5. A golf putter comprising a shaft, and a generally hexahedron shaped head connected with said shaft which is elongated and generally symmetrical in one direction: said head having a planar ball striking face defined substantially entirely by a discrete hard insert plate secured to said head; said head having a longitudinal bore therein and weight means including a separable weight removably secured in said bore, said weight means being separable from said head and a different heavier or lighter weight substitutable therefor to modify the overall weight of saidputter; said head including a bottom surface defined for its full lateral and longitudinal extent by alternate ribs and valleys extending transversely thereof, said ribs and valleys extending generally normal to said ball striking 5 face with said ribs forming only a minor portion of said bottom surface so that the area of possible contact of said bottom surface with a putting green is minimized during a putting stroke; and stroke aligning means at the top of said head, said means comprising an elongated spirit level tube which is secured to and forms a generally permanent part of said head, said tube being positioned with its longitudinal axis extending generally normal to said striking face, said tube having spirit fluid and a movable bubble therein for advising the golfer using said putter when said striking face is generally free of vertical cant.

6. The putter of claim 5 in which said head has two opposite striking faces each of which is defined by a hard insert plate secured to said head to define each of the opposite side surfaces of said head, whereby said putter is adapted for use by both right and left-handed golfers, said spirit level tube extending generally normal to each of said striking faces.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Slazenger 273-801 Taylor 273-167 Sanders 273-173 Swanson 273-78 X Reitenour 273-168 Smith 273-167 East 273-173 Crawshaw 273-801 Beardsley 273-168 X Fay 273-163 Clark 273-171 McCullough 273-162 FOREIGN PATENTS DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3429576 *Nov 19, 1965Feb 25, 1969Yoshiaki IkedaGolf club having level indicating means and weight means
US3749408 *Sep 13, 1971Jul 31, 1973Mills SGolf putter
US3841640 *Aug 3, 1972Oct 15, 1974Hunter JGolf putter
US3921984 *Nov 1, 1972Nov 25, 1975Winter Lloyd CClubhead having alignment means and high moment of inertia spaced from center of gravity thereof
US3955819 *Nov 3, 1975May 11, 1976Yokich Bernard AGolf putter
US4332388 *Feb 21, 1980Jun 1, 1982Cobra Golf, Inc. IiGolf club head
US4805922 *Sep 3, 1987Feb 21, 1989Whitfield Robert LPutter
US5294122 *Nov 25, 1992Mar 15, 1994Longo Paul FGolf putter
US5354060 *Mar 4, 1993Oct 11, 1994The Teardrop Putter CorporationGolf putter
US5460377 *Aug 5, 1994Oct 24, 1995Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter with face plate insert
US5464218 *Jul 7, 1994Nov 7, 1995Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with undercut back cavity and peripheral weighting
US5474297 *Dec 12, 1994Dec 12, 1995Levin; John M.Golf clubs for hitting low trajectory shots
US5605510 *May 15, 1995Feb 25, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter with face plate insert
US6129641 *Nov 10, 1998Oct 10, 2000Burch; BrianGolf putting scope
US7018304May 20, 2004Mar 28, 2006Bradford Brent WPutter head
US9248352 *Jun 20, 2015Feb 2, 2016Richard L. PattenVisual adjustable alignment system
US20040152537 *Mar 27, 2003Aug 5, 2004Moore Albert EdwardLow resistance golf club
US20050064953 *Nov 8, 2004Mar 24, 2005Moore Albert E.Low resistance golf club
US20050192114 *Dec 15, 2004Sep 1, 2005Pixl Golf CompanyInterchangeable alignment system for golf putters
US20050261080 *May 20, 2004Nov 24, 2005Bradford Brent WPutter head
US20060293112 *Jun 27, 2005Dec 28, 2006Kyong YiGolf club head including level and alignment indicators
USD377818Jan 16, 1996Feb 4, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with multi-arcuate configuration
USD378113Jan 16, 1996Feb 18, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with fluted rear side and stepped top wall
USD385933Jan 16, 1996Nov 4, 1997Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with recessed and fluted rear side
USD388851Jan 16, 1996Jan 6, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with recessed and fluted rear side and stepped top wall
USD401651Oct 31, 1997Nov 24, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head and angled hosel
USD402343Oct 31, 1997Dec 8, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head
USD402344Oct 28, 1997Dec 8, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with curved flutes and a curved hosel
USD402722Oct 28, 1997Dec 15, 1998Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with flutes and angled hosel
USD407445Mar 10, 1997Mar 30, 1999Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter head with recessed and curved and fluted rear side
USD414830Oct 28, 1997Oct 5, 1999Callaway Golf CompanyGolf putter with angled hosel and recess-intercepting, curved flutes at rear side
WO2000027487A1 *Nov 9, 1999May 18, 2000Brian BurchGolf putting scope and method of using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/241
International ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2053/0416, A63B49/06, A63B69/3685
European ClassificationA63B69/36P2