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Publication numberUS3240863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1966
Filing dateSep 16, 1963
Priority dateSep 16, 1963
Publication numberUS 3240863 A, US 3240863A, US-A-3240863, US3240863 A, US3240863A
InventorsBrede Robert G
Original AssigneeCarl A Aagesen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Standoff rod and bracing means for electric cables or the like
US 3240863 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. G. BREDE March 15, 1966 STANDOFF ROD AND BRAGING MEANS FOR ELECTRIC CABLES OR THE LIKE Filed Sept. 16 1963 INVENTOR. ROBERT G. BREDE 1042M Home 3 Fig. 1.

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United States Patent 3,240,863 STANDOFF ROD AND BRACING MEANS FOR ELECTRIC CABLES OR THE LIKE Robert G. Brede, Dows, Iowa, assignor of one-half to Carl A. Aagesen, Dows, Iowa Filed Sept. 16, 1963, Ser. No. 309,109 10 Claims. (Cl. 174-45) This invention relates generally to transmission wire supports and more particularly to a standoff device for lead-in wires of TV antennas.

Where television antennas are used outside of a building, which is the typical practice, it is desirable that the lead-in wires be held in spaced relation to the building structure and antenna mast. For this purpose, various types of standoffs are employed.

It is desirable that standoffs be very inexpensive. However, it is necessary to maintain leadin wires in tension to avoid motion and flexing which would otherwise be created by the wind and would cause eventual failure of the wires. The least expensive and most convenient standoff devices heretofore known have not usually been adequate to maintain the proper tension in the wires.

In many lead-in installations, it is necessary to change directions of the lead-in wire at various places. An example of such a place is that where the lead-in passes across the peak of a roof. It is necessary to locate a standoff at the peak to provide the desired space between the peak of the roof and the lead-in. Yet the standoffs presently available are not strong enough to properly support a lead-in at such a location.

It is, therefore, a general object of the present invention to provide an improved standoff device.

A further object is to provide a standoff device incorporating a brace of very simple and inexpensive construction and which is easily employed without tools.

A further object is to provide a standoff device including a brace which is well suited to mounting both to antenna masts and to building wall structures.

The full nature of the invention will be understood from the accompanying drawings and the following description and claims.

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a typical embodiment of the present invention as applied to a television antenna rnast.

FIG. 2 is a section through the illustration of FIG. 1 taken along the line 22 and viewed in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 3 is an elevational view of the brace support plate, the view being taken in the same direction as in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the brace support plate as seen from the right-hand side of the illustration in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of the brace wire and the rod 13 as they appear when viewed in the direction of the arrow 5 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an elevational view illustrating the invention as applied to a building wall.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary section taken along line 77 in FIG. 1 and viewed in the direction of the arrows.

In FIG. 1, the standoifs are shown closely spaced to conserve space in the drawing. Actually, the present invention, by bracing the standoffs, permits them to be spaced farther apart than could heretofore be successfully done.

Referring to the drawings in detail, a tubular antenna mast or pole 11 having a longitudinal axis 11a is shown having a pair of largely conventional standard standofis 12 mounted thereto. These standoffs include a rod 13 having a threaded inner end portion 14 and having a loop 16 at the outer end. A suitable insulating insert Patented Mar. 15, 1966 ice 17 is provided in the loop and has an aperture therethrough accommodating the television lead-in wire 18. A branch rod 19 is secured to the rod 13 and is formed in a loop 21 at its outer end and also receives a suitable insulating insert 22 having an aperture 23 therein suitable for receiving a lead-in wire. The shape of the apertures in the inserts depends on the type of lead-in wires being used.

The threaded portion 14 of the rod 13 is received in a substantially hollow base 24 which is a metal plate stamped into a shape accommodating mounting to the mast. A thin metal band employed as a fastener has one end fastened to the base 24 by means of rivet 25. The free end is passed around the mast at 26 and passed through the slots 26a in the walls of the base and pulled tight. Ordinarily, the rod 13 is then screwed into the base thereby forcing the portion of the band spanning the slots 26a into engagement with the mast to secure the assembly to the mast.

However, according to the present invent-ion, a brace support plate 27 is disposed between the base 24 and the outer surface of the mast. Also, the end of the rod 13 is pointed as shown at 47. As shown in FIGURE 4, the brace support plate includes an aperture 28 which receives the end portion of the rod adjacent portion 30 of the band which is pierced by pointed end 47 of the rod 13. It hereby positively maintains the vertical position of the support plate. Additional apertures 28a and 28b are provided and one or the other of these can be used instead of aperture 28 if desired, to accommodate positioning the support plate as desired.

An important advantage of the use of an aperture in the support plate will be described at this point. Ordinarily, when a standoff having a strap, rod, and base similar to that shown in the drawings herein, is mounted to a round pole, the tendency is for the end of the rod to walk or slide out of alignment with the center of the pole before the assembly is tight enough on the pole. Then it cannot be tightened properly. According to the present invention, however, the end 47 of the rod 12 pierces the band at 30 and enters and is guided by a selected one of the apertures 28, 28a, or 28b, before it gets a chance to go out of alignment. Consequently, the rod 12 can be screwed into the base to whatever extent necessary to secure the assembly to the pole as tightly as desired.

Further according to this invention, a brace 29 is provided. This brace is a continuous wire or rod which is symmetrical with respect to a plane 31 in which lies the axial center line of the mast 11. Beginning at the end 33 of one leg of the brace, there is a short portion 32 which extends in a direction perpendicular to the direction of the wire 18. This first portion extends a short distance whereupon there is a transition at the point 34 to a second portion 36 extending parallel to the direction of the wire 18. This second portion extends a short distance to a point 37 from which a third portion 38 of the rod extends at an angle with respect to the direction of the wire 18. As shown in the drawing, this third, angularly extending portion continues from point 37 a substantially greater distance than the sums of the short distances of the first and second portions to a point 39 where the angle with respect to the direction of the line 18 decreases for a fourth portion 41. As shown in the drawing portion 41 extends at an obtuse angle with respect to said third portion for a short distance and is terminated at a point 42 followed by a fifth portion 43 lying in the same plane 44 as the fourth portion, there being an acute angle between the fifth and fourth portions. The fifth portion then curves inwardly in the plane 44 to the plane 31 of symmetry of the brace, the inclined plane 44 being perpendicular to the plane of symmetry and lying at an acute angle with respect to the direction of the lead-in wire.

It is seen, therefore, that when viewed as shown in FIG. 2, the brace has the general appearance of a triangle with a re-entrant U where the apex of the triangle would ordinarily be. When viewed as shown in FIG. 5, the device has the general appearance of an M. When viewed as shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, the device is generally straight with an obtuse angle at each end.

The distance X in FIG. 1 between the junction 34 and the center 46 of the U is somewhat greater than the distance between the end 47 of the rod 13 and the beginning of loop 16 at point 48. The point 48 may be referred to as a loop junction of the rod 13 and engages the yoke at the center 46 of the U. The second portions 36 of the legs rest on the tabs 49 of the brace support plate, with the first portions 32 of the brace projecting through the apertures 51 of the brace support plate. The brace can be elastically deformed for installation, and when installed, it may remain elastically deformed to some extent, thereby making certain that contact is maintained between the loop junction of the rod and the yoke of the brace. Also, the fact that the yoke portion of the brace lies in the plane 44 which is inclined with respect both to the direction of the wire 18 and the direction of the rod 13 assures that the rod 13 cannot slip out of the yoke. This is because the loop 16 engages the outer face 53 of the yoke portion in a locking relationship. It also prevents the loop 16 from turning, thereby assuring that the rod 13 will not unscrew.

As shown in FIG. 5, the distance between corresponding portions 43 of the two legs where the imaginary line 45 is drawn between them normal to plane 31 is less than the diameter of rod 13. This necessitates an elastic spreading of these portions slightly to install the brace on the rod. When the brace is installed, the portions 43 return to their original state further insuring that the rod is retained in the yoke. The result is that there is a snap action as the brace is mounted on the rod.

By providing two braces as shown in FIG. 1, the proper tension in the wire 18 can be constantly maintained, it being understood, of course, that the apertures in the loop inserts are sufficiently snug on the wire to exert tension thereon.

Referring now more specifically to FIG. 6, the threaded end portion 14 of the standoff rod 13 is threadedly re- Ceived in the fiat member 54, which member may be a part of a building wall or siding or may be a board attached to the building wall, for example. Apertures 56 are provided in spaced relation to receive the leg portions 32 of the brace 29. The distance between the apertures 56 and their distance from the rod 13 can be selected as required to establish the desired mechanical bias on the rod 13. The brace functions in the same manner as described with reference to FIG. 1. Of course the apertures 56 need not extend completely through member 54. However, in certain materials, such as soft pine for example, it is not necessary to provide apertures as such, because the pointed ends 33 of the brace, can be pressed into the material and will securely anchor the legs. Moreover, by making the brace portions 32 comparatively short and pointed, and having the adjacent portion 36 disposed approximately at right angles thereto, the portions 32 can be conveniently driven into harder materials by striking portions 36 with a hammer.

It will be seen from the foregoing discussion that the present invention is well suited to achievement of all of the objectives set forth herein and provides other advantages and benefits which will become apparent to those skilled and working in the art.

While the invention has been disclosed and described in some detail in the drawings and foregoing description, they are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, as other modifications may readily suggest themselves to persons skilledin this art and within the broad scope of the invention, reference being bad to the appended claims.

The invenion claimed is:

1. A standoff device for holding a cable or the like in spaced relation to a pole and comprising: a base adapted to mounting to a pole and having a strap secured thereto for attachment to the pole; a rod threadedly received in said base and positioned to clamp a portion of said strap to the pole, said rod having a loop thereon and an insulator mounted in the loop in spaced relation to said base to hold a cable; a plate disposed adjacent said base and adapted to mounting of a portion thereof between said base and the pole, said portion having an aperture receiving said rod, and said plate having a pair of coplanar tabs with apertures therein; and a brace having a pair of legs thereon with generally L-shaped end portions received in said tab apertures and supported by said tabs, and said legs joining each other in a yoke engaging said rod and said loop in locking relationship to limit movement of said rod.

2. A standoff device for holding a cable or the like in spaced relation to a pole and comprising: a base adapted to mounting to a pole and having a fastener thereon for attachment to the pole; a rod threadedly received in said base, said rod having a loop thereon in spaced relation to said base and having an insulator mounted to the loop to hold a cable; a plate adjacent said base and positioned for fastening between said base and the pole, said plate having a pair of apertures in spaced relation to each other and to said rod; and a brace having a pair of legs, each of said legs having a portion received in one of said apertures and supported by said plate at said aperture, and said legs being connected to each other by a yoke, said yoke engaging said rod and loop in locking relationship to limit movement of said rod.

3. A standoff combination comprising: a pole having a longitudinal axis; a base; a strap securing said base to said pole; a brace support plate having a first portion conforming to said pole and disposed between said base and said pole and said plate having a second portion with laterally extending tabs, said tabs having apertures therein in spaced relation to each other; a rod threadedly received in said base and having an inner end clamping said first portion to said pole, said rod having a principal axis extending from said inner end outward radially with respect to the said axis of said pole and perpendicular thereto, and said rod having a loop thereon in spaced relation to said inner end and having an insulator mounted to the loop to hold a cable; and a brace having a pair of legs, each of said legs having a portion received in one of said apertures and supported by said plate at said aperture, the principal portions of said legs lying in a first plane disposed at a first acute angle with respect to said longitudinal axis, and said legs being connected to each other by a yoke, said yoke lying in a second plane disposed at a second acute angle with respect to said longitudinal axis, said second angle being smaller than said first angle, and said yoke engaging said rod and said loop in locking relation, said brace being in a condition of slight elastic deformation and biasing said rod normal to said longitudinal axis to maintain the locking relation and hold said rod in a fixed position against loading by a cable held in said insulator, the legs and yoke of said brace being formed of a continuous wire.

4. A standoff combination comprising: a support member having three apertures therein; a rod attached to said support member and received in a first of said apertures and extending outwardly therefrom and having a loop thereon in spaced relation to said support member, said rod having an axis extending normal to a line lying on the exterior of said support member; an insulator mounted to the loop to hold a cable; the second and third of said apertures in said support member being equally spaced from and lying on opposite sides of a first plane containing said rod axis; and a line connecting said second and third apertures being in spaced relation to said rod axis; and a brace having a pair of legs, each of said legs having a portion received in one of said second and third apertures and supported by said support member at the aperture in which received, and said legs being connected to each other by a yoke, said yoke lying principally in a second plane normal to said first plane and disposed at an acute angle with respect to said line lying on the exterior of said support member; and said yoke engaging said rod and said loop in locking relation.

5. A standofi brace comprising: a pair of legs, each leg beginning with a first portion beginning at an end of the leg and extending a short distance from the end, and each leg having a second portion extending from said first portion a short distance at an angle with said first portion, each leg having a third portion extending from said second portion a substantially greater distance than the sum of the distances of said first and second portions and said third portion extending at an angle with said second portion, said second portion extending in a direction different from the directions of extension of said first and third portions, each leg having a fourth portion extending a short distance from said third portion at an obtuse angle with said third portion, and each leg having a fifth portion extending a short distance from said fourth portion at an acute angle with said fourth portion, the fifth portion of each leg being joined to the fifth portion of the other leg forming a standoff rod receiver yoke.

6. The brace as set forth in claim 5 wherein all said portions are formed of a unitary continuous wire,

7. The brace of claim 5 wherein said first portions lie in a first plane, said second port-ions lie in a second plane, said third portions lie in a third plane and said fourth and fifth portions lie in a fourth plane, said first portions being on one side of said second plane and said third, fourth, and fifth portions being on the side of said second plane opposite said first portions.

8. A standoff combination comprising: a support member; a rod attached to said support member and extending outwardly therefrom and having a loop thereon in spaced relation to said support member, said rod having .an axis extending normal to a line lying on the exterior of said support member; an insulator mounted to the loop to hold a cable; a pair of apertures in said support member, said apertures being equally spaced from and lying on opposite sides of a first plane containing said rod axis, and a line connecting said apertures being in spaced relation to said rod axis; and a brace having a pair of legs, each leg having a first portion received in one of said apertures and extending a short distance, a second portion extending from said first portion a short distance at an angle with said first portion, a third portion extending from said second portion a substantially greater distance than the sum of the distances of extension of said first and second portions and said third portion extending at an angle with said second portion, a fourth portion extending a short distance from said third portion at an angle with said third portion, a fifth portion extending a short distance from said fourth portion at an acute angle with said fourth portion, the fifth portion of each leg being joined to the fifth portion of the other leg forming a yoke, and said yoke engaging said rod in locking relation.

9. A standoff device for holding a cable or the like in spaced relation to a pole and comprising: a base adapted to mounting to a pole and having a strap secured thereto for attachment to the pole; a rod threadedly received in said base and positioned to clamp a portion of said strap to the pole, said rod having a loop thereon and an insulator mounted in the loop in spaced relation to said base to hold a cable; a plate disposed adjacent said base and adapted to mounting of a portion thereof between said base and the pole, said plate having a pair of apertured tabs therein; and a brace having a pair of legs thereon with end portions received in said apertures and supported by said tabs, and said legs joining each other in a yoke engaging and retaining said rod to limit movement of said rod.

10. A standoff device for holding a cable or the like in spaced relation to a pole and comprising: a base adapted to mounting to a pole and having a fastener thereon for attachment to the pole; a rod member threadedly received in said base; a plate adjacent said base and having a portion disposed between said base and the pole, said plate having a pair of apertures in spaced relation to each other and to said rod; and a brace member having a pair of legs, each of said legs having a portion received in one of said apertures and supported by said plate at said aperture, and said legs being connected to each other by a yoke portion, said yoke portion engaging said rod member to limit movement of said rod member, said rod member having means thereon adapted to receive a cable or the like.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,429,029 10/1947 NeWbern 174-l63 X 2,801,277 7/1957 Numsen 174163 X 2,967,039 1/1961 Garman 248231 3,070,339 12/1962 Schayer 248-223 OTHER REFERENCES The Radio-Electronic Master, Telco Television Hardware, published by United Catalog Publishers, Inc., of Hempstead, New York, 22nd edition, 1958, page T-1439.

JOHN F. BURNS, Primary Examiner.

LARAMIE E. ASKIN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2429029 *Sep 11, 1945Oct 14, 1947Newbern Perry AElectric fence bracket
US2801277 *Mar 28, 1956Jul 30, 1957Numsen Harry PElectric fence holder and insulator
US2967039 *Jun 10, 1958Jan 3, 1961Prestole CorpStand-off guide for antenna cables
US3070339 *Sep 7, 1960Dec 25, 1962Wells Lamont CorpDisplay structure
Referenced by
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US3747540 *Feb 7, 1972Jul 24, 1973Atlas Metal Ind IncCorner clamps for shelving and the like
US4366937 *May 9, 1980Jan 4, 1983Heard Robert A HDevice for mounting an object to a post
US4859812 *Jan 28, 1987Aug 22, 1989Homac Mfg. CompanyFlat cable and sealing element
US4924038 *Apr 4, 1989May 8, 1990Homac Mfg. CompanyFlat cable sealing element
US5080199 *Sep 24, 1990Jan 14, 1992Siecor CorporationElevator cable hanger
US5263675 *Jan 5, 1993Nov 23, 1993Roberts Jack OSupport assembly
US5694733 *Jan 21, 1997Dec 9, 1997National Banner Company, Inc.Flag/banner display system
US5702081 *Dec 13, 1995Dec 30, 1997National Banner Company, Inc.Bracket apparatus
US5735415 *Jul 10, 1996Apr 7, 1998S. P. Wilson, Inc.Christmas tree with shelving system
US6823811Dec 18, 2003Nov 30, 2004Michael L. DrakeBuoy board
US9284160Nov 11, 2009Mar 15, 2016Safeworks, LlcStabilization devices
US20110214949 *Nov 11, 2009Sep 8, 2011Christopher Gavin BrickellStabilization devices
WO2010056766A1 *Nov 11, 2009May 20, 2010Safe Works, LlcStabilization devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/45.00R, 248/74.1, 174/163.00R, 248/351, 248/219.4, 174/154, 248/219.1
International ClassificationE04H12/24, H02G7/12, H02G7/20, E04H12/00, H02G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H12/24, H02G7/12, H02G7/205
European ClassificationH02G7/20C, H02G7/12