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Publication numberUS3241172 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1966
Filing dateMar 12, 1964
Priority dateMar 12, 1964
Publication numberUS 3241172 A, US 3241172A, US-A-3241172, US3241172 A, US3241172A
InventorsTilgner Ralph F
Original AssigneePittsburgh Plate Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brush construction
US 3241172 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 22, 1966 R. F. TILGNER BRUSH CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 12, 1964 FIG. I

RALPH F. T/LGNER.

ATTOI 7 March 22, 1966 R. F. TILGNER 3,241,172

BRUSH CONSTRUCTION Filed March 12, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 INVENTQR. RALPH F. Tue/v52 ATTOB EV March 22, 1966 R. F. TILGNER 3,241,172

BRUSH CONSTRUCTION Filed March 12, 1964 S Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 8

INVENTQR. RALPH E T/LGNER ATTOB 5V United States Patent 3,241,172 BRUSH CONSTRUCTION Ralph F. Tilgner, Ellicott City, Md., assignor to Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Mar. 12, 1964, Ser. No. 351,300 6 Claims. (Cl. -183) This application relates to a rotary, cylindrical brush. It particularly pertains to a novel construction for firmly locking replaceable brush strips to a cylindrical core.

Cylindrical brushes are advantageously utilized in numerous applications, such as permanently mounted brushes for cleaning sheet glass and sheet metal, such as steel, aluminum, nickel and the like; and for cleaning conveyors, such as belt conveyors for coal, sand, salt, ores, and the like.

Such cylindrical brushes may have the brush strips disposed parallel to the longitudinal axis or disposed in a helical configuration. The helical disposition of the brush strips render such brushes non-loading, i.e., the particles of dirt, metal and the like are not retained inbetween the brushes, but tend to move to one end of the brush and are thereby removed from the surface of the cleaned material.

Since many of these cylindrical brushes are permanently mounted, it is advantageous to utilize replace-able brush strips. Such strips generally comprise a channel backing element, doubled fill material, and a core mem her for retaining the fill material with the channel backing element. A typical brush strip is disclosed in US. Patent No. 3,038,759. r

In designing a cylindrical brush, it is desirable to utilize a standard cylindrical core member which is readily adaptable to the construction of numerous types of cylindrical brushes such as the cylindrical brushes disclosed in US. Patent No. 3,038,759. Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide a cylindrical brush which utilizes replaceable brush strips and :a cylindrical core member.

The present invention contemplates a construction wherein replaceable brush strips are disposed between retaining strips attached in pairs to a cylindrical core, said retaining strips being of thin, resilient material, preferably metal such as steel, aluminum and the like, having a generally rectangular shape and at least one of the longer edges of said strip being flared at an angle of about 15 to about 80 from the plane of that portion of the strip which contacts the cylindrical core.

Pairs of retaining strips are attached to the cylindrical core so that the flared edges of each strip are adjacent and form a generally U-shaped trough suitable for receiving a brush strip comprising doubled fill material contained in a U-shaped channel backing element.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may now be had to the accompanying drawings in which like numerals refer to like parts and in which FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a brush formed in accordance with the principles of the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary end view of a typical brush construction embodying the invention.

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of a single-flared, retaining strip of the type useful in this invention.

3,241,172 Patented Mar. 22, 1966 ice FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a double-flared, rolled-edge, retaining strip of the type useful in the present construction.

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of a length of brush strip of the type suitable for the purposes of the present invention.

FIGURE 6 is a perspective View of -a typical bushing useful in driving hollow, cylindrical core members which are particularly useful in the construction of the instant invention.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary end view of a novel means for securing a hollow cylindrical core member to a bushing member.

FIGURE -8 is an end view of a novel means for securing a hollow cylindrical core member to a bushing.

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of the novel securing means shown in FIGURE 8.

In the brush construction shown in FIGURE 1, the cylindrical core member 1, may be a solid cylinder of metal, wood, plastic or other suitable material, or the core may be a hollow cylinder formed of sheet metals such as aluminum, steel, nickel, and the like. The brush strip 2 is of the construction shown in FIGURE 5 and is hereinafter described. The brush strip is held firmly, but replaceably, in position by double-flared retaining strips 3. The retaining strips are fastened by rivets 4, by welding, or similar means to the cylindrical core member 1. Also shown is a novel means for fastening a cylinder of sheet metal or other suitable material to a bushing 10 having a slot 11 and a screw 12. This fasten ing construction is more fully illustrated in FIGURES 6 and 7.

As shown in FIGURE 2, the retaining strips 3, are positively attached to the cylindrical core member by rivets 4. Other means of positive attachment such as screws, bolts, spot welding and the like also may be utilized. The retaining strips 3 exemplify one embodiment of the invention wherein the edge of the strip intended to contact the brush strip is flared inwardly be fore being flared outwardly. The retaining strips preferably contact the channel backing element: of the brush strip at or near the base of the channel backing element and also contact the fill material at lines immediately above the upper edges of the channel backing element.

FIGURE 3 depicts a retaining strip having a single flared edge 5. The retaining strip may be constructed of resilient aluminum, steel, nickel and the like. Stainless steel is the preferred material of construction because of its strength and corrosion resistance. The flared edge may be further folded 6 so that a smooth, non-cutting surface will contact the fill material of the brush strip. It is preferred that the flared edge be folded when the brush filament are fibers of Tampico, sisal, nylon and the like.

The retaining strip of FIGURE 4 is similar to the double-flared strip of FIGURE 1 but shows another type of folded edge. Numerous other types of folded edges may be utilized; although when the brush .filaments are of metal such as steel, nickel and the like, the flared edge need not be folded.

FIGURE 5 depicts a brush strip comprising a channel backing 7, which is preferably of sheet metal; doubled fill material 8, which may be natural fibers such as Tampico, sisal and the like, manufactured fibers such as nylon, fiber glass and the like, or metal filaments such as steel, aluminum, nickel, brass and the like; and a core-retaining member 9 of metal or cord, such as nylon.

The manufacture and detailed construction of brush strips is shown in US. Patent No. 3,038,759. Brush strips manufactured and constructed according to that patent are readily usable in the present invention.

In FIGURE 6 a bushing used as a driving means for hollow cylindrical core members is shown. These bushings may be constructed of Wood, metal, or plastic. Of the metals, cast aluminum is preferred although steel, brass, and other metals may be readily utilized. Plastics include nylon, Teflon, phenol-formaldehyde resins, melamine-formaldehyde resins, unsaturated polyester resins. and similar plastics which are hard and rigid at tempcratures of about F. to about 250 F. The plastics may be reinforced with filamentary material such as glass fibers and the like.

The bushing has an indentation lll in its peripheral surface which provides a locking arrangement with the hollow cylindrical core member. The locking means as shown in FIGURE 7 depicts a hollow cylindrical core member 1 being deformed by pressure from a screw 12 so that the cylinder wall is forced at least partially into the indentation 111 of the bushing 10, thereby providing a positive driving means. Other means of positively attaching the hollow cylinder to the arbor may be utilized, as for example, the cylinder wall could be forced snugly into the indentation 11 of the arbor 1i) and then positively attached to the arbor by spotwelding, riveting, and similar means.

In FIGURES 8 and 9, another means for securing a hollow cylindrical core member 1 to a bushing 10 is disclosed. Instead of a slot cut in the periphery of the bushing, a hole 13 is drilled in the bushing 10. The cylindrical core member is then dimpled or punched in such a manner as to press or extend some of the metal 14 of the cylindrical core member into the hole 13 in the bushing. This metal protuberance extending into the hole in the bushing securely fastens the core member to the bushing; preventing motion in all directions. More than one hole in the bushing may be utilized for a more rugged construction.

In manufacturing the cylindrical brushes of the instant invention, a retaining strip of the type illustrated in FIGURES 3, 4 is firmly attached to a core member, which may be a hollow metal cylinder. The brush strip may be parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical core member or one end of the retaining strip may be radially displaced about 1 to about 90 from the other end of the strip. A second retaining strip is attached to the core member in such a manner as to have the flared edges of the retaining strips adjacent to each other and forming a continuous U-shaped trough extending over the surface of the cylinder. This operation is repeated until the de sired number of strips are attached to the core member. Generally, the retaining strips are attached in such a manner as to provide at least three U-shaped troughs spaced approximately equidistantly about the periphery of the cylindrical core member.

The retaining strips are placed adjacently in such a manner that the flared edges exert a pressure upon a brush strip disposed in the U-shaped trough formed by a pair of adjacent retaining strips. The retaining strips may be placed adjacently so that the distance between the flared edges at the surface of the cylindrical core member is only slightly larger than the width of the channel backing element thereby exerting pressure upon the channel backing element at its base as well as exerting pressure near the upper edge of the channel backing element.

The brush strips are held firmly in place by the retaining strips and are not readily displaced. However, the brush strips may be replaced when worn by moving the 4 worn brush strip along the surface of the cylindrical core towards one end of the trough until it is completely removed. A new brush strip can then be inserted at one end of the trough and slid into position.

The hollow cylindrical core members mentioned hereinabove may be smooth, hollow cylinders of sheet metal or may be corrugated tubes of the type disclosed in US. Patent No, 3,107,381. Corrugated tubes may be used effectively as the tube may be designed so that the base of the channel backing of the brush strips may be reposed within a corrugation, thus lending lateral support to the brush strip.

The above description illustrates the novel features of the invention, however, it is not intended to limit the invention solely thereto, but to include all of the variations and modifications falling within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A rotary brush core member comprising (a) a cylindrical core, and

(b) retaining strips attached in pairs to said cylindrical core, said retaining strips being of thin, resilient material having a generally rectangular shape, at least one of the longer edges being flared in such a manner that when paired retaining strips are attached to the cylindrical core with flared edges adjacent to one another a generally U-shaped trough is obtained, said U-shaped trough being suitable for receiving a brush strip comprising doubled fill material contained in a U-shaped channel backing element and said retaining strips preferably contacting the channel backing element of the brush strip near the base of the channel backing element and contacting the fill material immediately above the upper edges of the channel backing element.

2. A rotary brush core member comprising (a) a cylindrical core, and

(b) retaining strips attached in pairs to said cylindrical core in a helical configuration, said retaining strips being of thin, resilient material having a generally rectangular shape, at least one of the longer edges being flared at an angle of about 15 to about from the plane of that portion of the strip which contacts the cylindrical core, said paired retaining strips being attached to the cylindrical core so that the flared edges are adjacent and form a generally U-shaped trough, said U-shaped trough being suitable for receiving a brush strip comprising doubled fill material contained in a U-shaped channel backing element and said retaining strips preferably contacting the channel backing element of the brush strip near the base of the channel backing element and contacting the fill material immediately above the upper edges of the channel backing element.

3. The rotary brush core member of claim 2 wherein the cylindrical core is a hollow cylindrical core.

4. A rotary brush core member comprising (a) a cylindrical, hollow, sheet-metal core, and

(b) rectangular resilient metal retaining strips positively attached in pairs to said cylindrical core, each retaining strip having at least one of its longer edges flared at an angle of about 15 to about 80 from the plane of that portion of the strip which contacts the cylindrical core, said paired strips being attached to: said cylindrical core to form a generally U-shaped trough, said U-shaped trough being suitable for receiving a brush strip comprising doubled fill ma-- terial contained in a U-shaped channel backing element and said retaining strips preferably contacting the channel backing element of the brush strip nearthe base of the channel backing element and contacting the fill material immediately above the upper edges of the channel backing element. Q

5. The rotary brush core member of claim 4 wherein the retaining strips are positively attached in pairs to said cylindrical core in a helical configuration.

6. The rotary brush core member of claim 4 wherein the resilient metal retaining strips are of stainless steel. 5

UNITED References Cited by the Examiner STATES PATENTS 6 3/1954 Sawyer et al n 15--183 X 8/1954 Morra 29124 X 4/1961 Park 15-183 1/1963 Peterson 15202 3/1964 Nelson 15--182 7/1964 Grogan et a1. 15-182 FOREIGN PATENTS 1/ 1957 France. 3/ 1959 Switzerland.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

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Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3533125 *Aug 21, 1968Oct 13, 1970James A BuechelSegmental cylindrical brush assembly
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US5134838 *Jul 20, 1990Aug 4, 1992Swisher Mower And Machine Co., Inc.Mower pick-up broom
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/183, 15/182
International ClassificationA46B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA46B13/005
European ClassificationA46B13/00B4