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Publication numberUS3241661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1966
Filing dateJul 21, 1964
Priority dateJul 21, 1964
Publication numberUS 3241661 A, US 3241661A, US-A-3241661, US3241661 A, US3241661A
InventorsBowen Richard B, Folsom Warner L, Zamzow Dale R
Original AssigneeBowen Richard B, Folsom Warner L, Zamzow Dale R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Impact resistant multiple bottle package
US 3241661 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 22, 1966 D. R. zAMzow ET AL 3,241,661

IMPACT RESISTANT MULTIPLE BOTTLE PACKAGE :www .I @ZWS v, @Ma/a. E T42? N NZB w. wp.. L

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.l1-wa@ United States Patent 3,241,661 IMPACT RESISTANT MULTPLE BQTTLE PACKAGE Dale R. Zamzow, P.O. Box 1032; Richard B. Bowen, 3208 Moorpark, Apt. 2; and Warner L. Folsom, 1125 Ranchero Way, Apt. 19, all of San Jose, Calif.

Filed July 21, 1964, Ser. No. 384,194 2 Claims. (Cl. 206-46) The present invention relates to a bottle package, and pertains more particularly to an impact resistant bottle package comprising a block of impact absorbing material having a plurality of bottle receiving recesses extending thereinto from opposite sides thereof, covers of impact absorbing material being provided in fitted relation over each recessed side of the package and the ends of bottles therein to retain and protect such bottles.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved, protective package for containing a plurality of bottles.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved package for containing a plurality of bottles, the package comprising a body portion of impact absorbing material having a plurality of bottle-receiving openings extending thereinto from opposite sides thereof, with covers to retain and protect bottles inserted in the recesses in the body portion.

Another object of the invention is to provide an irnproved package for containing a plurality of bottles wherein a body portion of impact absorbing material has two pluralities of bottle receiving recesses molded to extend thereinto from opposite sides thereof, each recess comprising a larger diameter portion to receive the body of a bottle, and a smaller diameter extension portion to receive the neck of such bottle, the two pluralities of recesses being relatively located so that the neck extensions thereof are in overlapping relation with each other.

The foregoing objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a bottle package ernbodying the present invention as its appears when ready for shipment.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, end, elevational View of the package shown in FIG. 1, a portion of one cover thereof being broken away.

FIG. 3 is a similarly enlarged sectional View taken along line 3--3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the package shown in FIGS. l-3 showing the covers of the package and some of the bottles removed endwise from the body portion.

Brief description Briey, the illustrated form of the invention comprises a bottle package A having a rectangular body portion with a desired plurality of bottle receiving recesses 11a and 11b extending thereinto from two opposite sides thereof. The recesses in one side of the body portion 10 are oifset laterally from those in the other side, as best shown in FIG. 2, and the neck receiving portions of the two sets of recesses are in relatively overlapping relation with each other, as best shown in FIG. 3. The recesses 11a and 11b are of such a depth that the base of each bottle 12 inserted therein extends slightly from its recess, so as to permit the bottle to be grasped for removal. A pair of package covers 13a and 13b are provided to tit, one over each bottle receiving side of the body portion lll, each cover having a plurality of shallow recesses 14 therein to receive the projecting bases of the bottles covered thereby.

Detailed description Referring to the drawings in greater detail, in the illustrative bottle package A, the rectangular body portion 10 3,241,661 Patented Mar'. 22, 1966 is of light weight, impact absorbing material, such as an inexpensive, plastic foam material. The latter material may be either slightly resilient, or substantially non-resilient, as preferred. Since numerous suitable plastic foam materials, and the manner of molding thereof, are well known to those familiar with the art of plastics and plastic molding, it will be unnnecessary herein to describe the details of either the material or the molding procedures therefor.

The body portion 10 preferably is of generally rectangular form, and the two pluralities of bottle receiving recesses 11a and 11b extend thereinto from opposite sides of the body portion. The bottle receiving recesses 11a and 11b are similar to each other, and each is of a size to receive a selected type of bottle 12 slidably inserted therein. The t of the bottles in the recesses preferably is such as to permit the bottles to be easily inserted in, and withdrawn from, the recesses, but to restrain the bottles from any appreciable lateral movement therein.

Each bottle receiving recess is of a depth to receive therein a selected size and type of bottle with the base portion 15 thereof projecting from the body portion 10 suiciently to permit the bottle to be manually grasped for easy removal. A bottle base projection of approximately one half to three quarters of an inch is considered satisfactory for a quart size bottle, but this may be varied as required, and will depend somewhat upon the shape and surface conformation of tbe projecting base portion of the bottle. For example, a bottle with a rather square base corner and a roughened or otherwise contigurated side surface would be more easily grasped than would one with a well rounded base corner and smooth surface. In any event, the required amount of base projection may be readily determined by making a few simple and obvious tests with a bottle of the selected type before designing the mold for making the package.

A marginal rim 17 preferably is provided around each bottle receiving side of the body portion 10 to provide a shallow recess 18 extending throughout the bottle receiving area of each such side for receiving an offset inner panel portion 19 formed on each cover member 13a and 13b. Each cover member comprises an outer panel portion 20 of suitable thickness, and of a size to conform to the exterior of a side of the body portion 10 onto which it is to be fitted, and the preferably integral inner panel portion 19, which is of a size to t into the recess 18 defined by each marginal rim 17.

A plurality of the bottle base receiving recesses 14 are provided in each inwardly projecting panel portion 20, and are positioned to receive the projecting base portions 15 of the bottles inserted in the bottle receiving recesses 11a and 11b of the body portion 10.

In the illustrated package A, as best shown in FIG. 2, there are four horizontal rows of three recesses each in each side of the body portion 10. The axes of the recesses in each horizontal row lie in the same horizontal plane on both sides of the body portion, but the axes of the recesses in one side are midway between the axes of those on the other side. The transverse spacing between the axes of adjacent recesses in the same horizontal row on one side of the body portion is twice that of the vertical spacing between the axes of adjacent rows. The axes of both sets of recesses 11a and 11b thus define a grid 21 of squares as shown in dot-dash lines in FIG. 2.

The illustrative package A holds 24 bottles, a desirable and customary case lot, and the arrangement of the recesses 11a and 11b therein permits the covers 13a and 13b to be made identical, and they are therefore interchangeable. While this specic arrangement of the recesses 11a and 11b is not essential, it is desirable in many instances.

1n using the package A, which has particular utility for shipping bottled wine, after the two sets of bottle receiving recesses 11a and 11b have been filled with bottles 12 of a selected type, the cover members 13a and 13b are fitted thereon, as best shown in FIG. 3, with the projecting base portions 15 of the bottles fitted into the correspondingly located recesses 14 in the cover members, and with the inner offset panel portion 19 of each cover member fitted into its associated recess 18 formed by the rim 17. The cover members 13a and 13b are then secured in position on the body portion by suitable fastening means, such as, for example, the metal straps 22 (FIGS. 1-3) which are of a well known type.

When it is desired to open the package A, the straps 20 or other fastening means (not shown) by which the covers 13a and 13b are secured in position, are released, as by cutting the straps, whereupon the covers 13a and 13b may be easily removed to expose the projecting base portions 15 of the bottles.

If the package is used for shipping bottled wine, after the package has been opened the body portion 10 may be left lying on an unrecessed side thereof With the bottles therein as shown in FIG. 2. In this position the bottles will lie with their axes horizontal, so that the wine therein will keep the corks wet, and thereby provide a very satisfactory storage compartment for the wine. The bottles may be withdrawn from the body portion, one at a time as desired, and the cover replaced, frictional engagement of the cover with the rim 17 and the bases of the bottles being sufficient to retain the cover lightly in place.

In addition to protecting the bottles against damage during shipment, and providing a satisfactory storage rack, the package A, when the covers are in place, provides effective heat insulation for the bottles contained therein, and also protects them from exposure to light, all of which are very desirable features in a package for containing bottled wine or other liquids which may be packed therein.

While we have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it will be understood, however, that various changes and modifications may be made in the details thereof without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what we claim as new and desired to protect by Letters Patent is dened in the following claims.

1. An impact resistant package containing a plurality of bottles comprising:

a body of plastic foam material shaped to define a plurality of bottle receiving recesses of a length slightly less than the height of the bottle received therein, and extending into the body from two opposite sides thereof whereby the base of each bottle projects slightly beyond the body, the portion of the body defining each bottle receiving recess comprising a larger diameter portion receiving the body of the bottle, and a smaller diameter extension thereof receiving the neck of the bottle therein, the portions of the body defining the recesses in one side of the body being laterally offset from the portions of the body defining the recesses in the other side of the body, the body being of less width between the two opposite, recessed sides thereof than twice the length of the bottles inserted in said recesses,

a marginal rim surrounding each recessed side of the body, and

a pair of cover members fitted one onto each recessed side of the body and into the surrounding rim thereof, each cover member having a plurality of shallow recesses therein receiving the projecting base portions of each of said bottles inserted in the body recesses.

2. An impact resistant package containing a plurality of bottles comprising:

a body of plastic foam material shaped to defiine a plurality of bottle receiving recesses of a length slightly less than the height of the bottle received therein, and extending into the body from two opposite sides thereof, whereby the base of each bottle projects slightly beyond the body, the portion of the body defining each bottle receiving recess comprising a larger diameter portion receiving the body of the bottle, and a smaller diameter extension thereof receiving the neck of the bottle therein, the portions of the body defining the recesses in one side of the body being laterally offset from the portions of the body defining the recesses in the other side of the body, the body being of less width between the two opposite recessed sides thereof than twice the length of the bottles inserted in said recesses,

a pair of cover members fitted one onto each recessed side of the body, each cover member having a plurality of shallow recesses therein receiving the projecting base portions of said bottles inserted in the body recesses.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 10/1954 Belgium. 6/1961 France. 10/ 1962 Great Britain.

OTHER REFERENCES 1,078,932, March 1960, German application.

THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

LOUIS G. MANCENE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1926916 *Apr 1, 1931Sep 12, 1933Edward H ReevesEgg container
US2042446 *Mar 7, 1932May 26, 1936J L Ferguson CompanyBottle packing method and means
US2971640 *Apr 7, 1958Feb 14, 1961Snelling Charles DPlastic foam packaging
BE529390A * Title not available
FR1266577A * Title not available
GB907038A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3331502 *Jun 3, 1966Jul 18, 1967George GeroContainer structure for product handling, shipping and display
US3363957 *Jun 21, 1966Jan 16, 1968Westinghouse Electric CorpChassis support structure
US3365260 *Apr 13, 1966Jan 23, 1968Robert E. SaxonSpice chest
US3467245 *May 28, 1968Sep 16, 1969Fuji Photo Film Co LtdShock absorbing package and display member
US3572534 *Mar 21, 1969Mar 30, 1971Charles BenoitDevice for the transport of bottles
US3631969 *Dec 10, 1969Jan 4, 1972Lacoste JeanEnclosure for an ogival shell
US3670918 *Sep 4, 1970Jun 20, 1972Kenneth A MitchellThermal container assembly
US3750871 *Feb 14, 1972Aug 7, 1973Engin Foam Plastics IncShipping container
US3784989 *Jul 10, 1972Jan 15, 1974P LegrandHigh-density relax-transport system
US3955704 *Jul 19, 1973May 11, 1976Clearex Plastics Ltd.Storage device
US4375262 *Aug 10, 1981Mar 1, 1983Tekni-Plex, Inc.Containers for fragile articles
US4620579 *Nov 28, 1984Nov 4, 1986Lowe Alpine Systems, Inc.Accessory receptacle
US4640418 *Apr 8, 1985Feb 3, 1987June A. LowryProtective bulk pack container for ice cream cones
US4826003 *Mar 14, 1988May 2, 1989Abner LevyVertical pack collection kit
US4868028 *Jan 26, 1988Sep 19, 1989Baron Philippe De Rothschild S.A.Transport and storage case
US4955480 *Jul 21, 1989Sep 11, 1990Sexton Wilson CPortable insulated carrier
US4971209 *Jun 5, 1985Nov 20, 1990Richard ToddBottle storage and serving holder
US5450948 *Apr 14, 1994Sep 19, 1995Gtel Environmental Laboratories, Inc.Container and package for transporting temperature sensitive samples
US6817471 *Oct 12, 2001Nov 16, 2004Brookstone Purchasing, Inc.Display container
DE3108850A1 *Mar 9, 1981Jan 21, 1982SacomacPackaging container
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/433, 206/523, 217/19
International ClassificationB65D85/30, B65D81/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/022, B65D85/305
European ClassificationB65D81/02A, B65D85/30C