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Publication numberUS3241814 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1966
Filing dateMay 22, 1964
Priority dateMay 22, 1964
Publication numberUS 3241814 A, US 3241814A, US-A-3241814, US3241814 A, US3241814A
InventorsForte Foster M
Original AssigneeForte Foster M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Upholstery staple dislodging and extracting tool
US 3241814 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. M. FORTE March 22, 1966 UPHOLSTERY STAPLE DI TSLODGING AND EXTRACTING TOOL Filed May 22, 1964 Foster M. Fone INVENTOR.

United States Patent 3,241,814 UPHOLSTERY STAPLE DISLUDGING AND EXTRACTTNG TOOL Foster M. Forte, 1025 E. 18th St., National Qity, Calif. Filed May 22, 1964, Ser. No. 369,486 2 Claims. (Cl. 25428) This invention relates to an upholsterers hand tool which is functionally designed and uniquely constructed for successfully dislodging and removing staples from furniture frames and component parts and has to do with a precision-type staple extractor which is such in construction that the job at hand can be quickly, easily and effectively handled.

Persons conversant with upholstering are aware that staples of a prescribed type and size are now widely used for securing fabrics and material to furniture frames and complemental parts. It is equally well known that the task of removing staples when undertaking a reupholstering job is tedious and time-consuming and has long posed a perplexing problem for the upholsterer. Many light duty type extracting tools have been devised and olfered and are being used but none of these available tools fulfill the needs of those who are called upon to use them. For example, one currently employed staple puller comprises a small pry bar about five inches long with a one-half inch wide staple-engaging and lifting end. This tool works with reasonable success only when the bridge or bight portion of the anchored staple is accessible above the work surface. It is virtually useless when the staple is driven flush, has been embedded and ditficult to cope with. Another type of extractor comprises a small prying foot having a curved lever-type handle wherein a wedge-like prying nib has to be forced and wedged into position under the bight portion of the staple before the levering step can be accomplished. This extractor has been found to be cumbersome. It serves only clumsily in many places which are diificult of access and cannot be relied upon for lifting crooked and embedded staples. It follows that the objective in the instant matter is to provide a simple, practical plierstype tool (about six inches or so in length) which is characterized by uniquely constructed jaw-ends which are oriented in a manner that by merely squeezing the spring-opened handles together, said jaw-ends coordinate with each other and the staple (embedded or not) and remove it intact. Accordingly, and as will be hereinafter more fully understood and appreciated, this improved extractor well serves the purposes for which it is intended.

In addition to the upholsterers-type staple removers above mentioned there are, of course, many heavy duty staple pullers for fence wires and retaining staples therefor. For the most part the jaws are horn-like or beakshaped and sharp-pointed and would, even if they were small enough for upholsterers use, snap and break the staple acted on with the result that valuable time and patience would be exhausted in removing embedded staple fragments with pliers. Unlike prior art staple extractors the extractor herein disclosed employs specially shaped jaws or terminals, which are hook-like but broad in form. They coincide and behave in such a manner that the likelihood of improper performance is reduced to a minimum. Consequently, the staple which is being handled seldom breaks and therefore can be yanked out fully and virtually intact.

In carrying out the present invention the contouring and orientation of the jaws is critical. This is to say the body portion of one jaw has its rearward longitudinal edge cambered and fashioned into a levering heel or fulcrum which comes into play in lifting and extracting 3,Z4l,dl i Patented Mar. 22, 1966 the staple. This same jaw has a laterally offset adapter portion which is fashioned into a hook-shaped bill portion which is amply long and curved and terminates in a broad knife-like tip or nib precisely one-eighth of an inch wide. Likewise, the companion or complemental terminal of the other jaw is provided with a similar but shorter hook-shaped bill portion. It too is one-eighth of an inch in width. Accordingly, when these jaws are forced into side-by-side cooperative relationship the combined width fittingly coincides with the bight portion of the staple (three-eighths of an inch) and assures the user that a correct clawing grip on the staple will be had before the dislodging and yanking step is initiated and completed.

The more efficient ones tools the greater his ability to get his work done. The less time and laborious effort involved the better the job can be done. The extractor herein revealed is made to do one thingre move upholstery staples evenly, easily without breakage. It is small enough (about six inches or so in length) to be conveniently held and manipulated in one hand, The jaw terminals comprise hook-shaped broad bill pincers one of which is laterally offset. The sides or checks are planar and coordinate their respective functions to the end that a reliable improved result is attained. Accordingly, the capacity of the jaws to behave properly assures the user acceptable performance at all times.

The contoured side-by-side relationship and followthrough and bypassing action of the unique long and short hook-like jaws provides an extractor which is versatile, is easily applied and removed and is such that the thus constructed jaws can sink into the stapled fabric, get to, scoop up and remove a sunken staple. Keeping in mind that currently used upholstery staples are threeeighths of an inch wide with prongs three-quarters of an inch long, it can be understood and appreciated that a precision jaw extractor such as that herein shown is the style and type needed for unhampered performance.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view in side elevation showing an upholstery staple dislodging and extracting tool constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention and also showing how the handles are gripped and used in full lines and how the tool is rocked from left to right in a manner to dislodge and extract the staple;

FIGURE 2 is an edge elevation on an enlarged scale fragmentary taken approximately on the plane of the vertical section line 22 of FIGURE 1 and which shows the manner in which the companion oriented jaws engage the bight portion of the staple which is to be removed; and

FIGURE 3 is a section taken on the plane of the horizontal section line 3-3 of FIGURE 1.

As is evident from FIGURE 1 (which shows the tool approximately full-size) the first lever unit, the one to the right is denoted by the numeral 6 and the second complemental or companion lever unit, the one to the left, is denoted by the numeral '8. These levers or units are basically the same in construction in that each lever is approximately six and one-half inches long. The lower end portions of the two levers, which are rectangular in cross-section, are crossed and hingedly or pivotally connected by a suitable pivot pin 10. The portions above the pivot pin are fashioned into appropriate handles 12 and 14. The portions below the pivot pin are fashioned into the aforementioned unique jaws, the body portion of one jaw being denoted at 16 and the body portion of the other jaw being denoted at 18. A substantially V- shaped spring is provided as at 20 and this has its crotch portion fashioned into a coil which is shown in FIG. 2 at 22. This coil surrounds the cooperating headed end of the pivot pin 10. The upwardly diverging arms or limbs 24 and 26 are connected with anchoring lugs or keepers 28 provided therefor on the respective levers. The spring acts to normally expand or spread the handles 12 and 14 to an open position. With reference now to FIG. 2 it will be seen that the lower half-portion of the jaw member 16 is decreased in cross-section at the point 30 and is thus fashioned into an extension 32. This extension in turn is formed into one of the two jaws. It will be noted that the vertcial sides or cheeks 34 and 36 are fiat and parallel. Accordingly, this jaw is substantially rectangular in cross-section with the cheek or side 34 flush with the elongated fiat surface 38 of the jaw member 16. It will be further noted as shown in FIG. 1 that this jaw 32 is gradually reduced in cross-section from the shoulder 30 to the free or tip end of the jaw and is also curved from left to right in FIG. 1 and is consequently hook-shaped in side elevation. The curved bill portion is relatively short and has a straight-across knifelike edge 40 which permits it to be wedged into the position shown, for example, in FIG. 3. The corresponding lower end of the jaw member or body portion 18 extends to a point below the shoulder 30 where it is bent or laterally directed as at 42 to provide proper orientation of the second jaw. This offset portion as shown in FIG. 3 is formed with a forward extension which constitutes and provides the offset second jaw 44. This jaw, like the first-named jaw 32, is also rectangular in cross-section and it too is curved in side elevation and fashioned into a hook. It will also be noted in FIG. 3 that this hook is attenuated and longer than the hook which characterizes the jaw 32 and that a tapering construction provides a straight-across featheredged or knife-like bill portion 46. The vertical cheeks or side surfaces 48 and 50 are parallel to each other and the cheek 48 is in closely spaced proximity to the cheek 36 of the jaw 32. It follows that the jaws move through limited arcuate paths and when in gripping relationship they flank one another and in fact by-pass or move into side-by-side relationship. The cross-sectional dimension of each jaw is one-eighth of an inch, the conjoint measurement of the jaws in use being one-quarter of an inch. This distinctive dimensional feature is critical because of the fact that the jaws are not only expressly hook-shaped and dimensionally different in length they combine to function correctly with the conventional upholstery staple 52 shown in FIG. 2. This staple has a bight or bridge portion 54 which is threeeighths of an inch, the lateral prongs being one-quarter to three-quarters of an inch in length as designated at 56 in FIG. 2.

It follows that the invention comprises a small pair of easy-to-use pliers wherein the handles and jaws are normally held in open position by the spring means 20.

The curved bill portions of the two jaws are fiat on the inner and outer surfaces and by reason of the offset construction at 42 a two-part grip resulting from the coaction of the straight-across knife-like edges 40 and 46 is achieved as shown in both FIGS. 2 and 3, that is when the jaws are moved to closed position. Assuming that the handles 12 and 14 are in a normal open position and held in that position by way of the spring means 2f) the portion of the bridge of the staple 54 to the left in FIG. 2 can be engaged by wedging the tip or bill portion 40 into position between the fabric and staple. It is to be pointed out in this connection that the jaws are intended to function properly whether the frame is covered or uncovered and whether the bight portion 54 of the staple 52 is embedded or not. In any event the tip or bill portion 40 can be engaged with the staple as a first step.

The next and second step is to grip the two handles 12 and 14 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1, wherein the tool is shown in full lines and also at the right in phantom lines. Assuming that the feather-edged tip 40 front or forward jaw 32 is engaging the front of the staple it will be clear that the pry jaw 44, that, can now be the tip end 46 is forced under the bight portion of the staple. The staple is then engaged and if necessary the jaw tips are pressed or forced into the fabric in the manner suggested in FIG. 2. The combined action of the two jaws hooked beneath the bight portion 54 of the staple 52 and the simultaneous side-by-side action of the jaws engages the staple evenly and permits it to be removed intact. Consequently this oriented twin jaw construction eliminates the danger that one prong of the staple will be dislodged and lifted while the other remains embedded. With the bight portion effectively clawed and held, in the next and final step the tool is fulcrumed or rocked from left to right, the staple is levered out of the material or frame and the handles are spread apart by the action of the spring. The rearward edge 19 is cambered or curved convexly in the manner shown to provide the desired fulcrum for the rocking step.

It is a matter of common knowledge that when it comes to using a tool, experience and practice will determine for the user the ultimate best mode of applying, handling and using the same. The manner in which the tool is herein shown and the way in which the same is used is not controlling. On the other hand, it should be evident that a tool featuring the precision made, carefully coordinated and oriented jaws provides a reliable adaptation which assures the user of achieving the end result desired. Accordingly, a more extended description of the tool is deemed to be unnecessary.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An upholstery staple dislodging and removing hand tool comprising: a relatively small pair of light duty pliers embodying a pair of companion levers having median portions overlapped, crossing each other and pivotally joined together, the respective portions of said levers above the pivot point being fashioned into and constituting handles and the portions thereof below said pivot point being fashioned into and constituting upholstery staple engaging and removing jaws, one of said jaws being laterally offset in a manner to flank and bypass the other jaw and both of said jaws being hook-shaped in side elevation and having their terminal bill portions toed up and in toward each other in a manner to approach and bypass each other when the handles are squeezed together against the tension of said spring means, one of said jaws being short and the other jaw long, the last-named jaw being the aforementioned laterally offset jaw, said bill portions terminating in broad straight across knife-like leading edges, both of said jaws, including said bill portions, being rectangular in cross-section and of the same cross-sectional dimension, the cross-sectional dimension of each jaw being substantially one-eighth of an inch whereby when they assume side-by-side parallel relationship the total width is then equal to one-quarter of an inch, the latter measurement being critical in that it is thus adapted to properly cope with an upholsterers staple whose bight portion is three-eighths of an inch in length, the body portion of said offset jaw having a curvilineal rearwardly disposed edge aligned with and merging with the conformingly curved rearward edge of said jaw to provide a tool rocking and fulcruming heel.

2. A staple removing tool comprising a first lever having a handle at one end and a jaw member at the other end, an end portion of said jaw member being reduced in cross-section and providing an extension rectangular in cross-section, gradually reduced in cr-oss-section, curved in side elevation and fashioned into a tapering hook-like jaw, the terminal leading end of said jaw being straight across and providing a knife-like bill portion, a second lever of a length corresponding to said first lever and having a median portion thereof superimposed on and crossing and pivotally connected with a like median portion of said first lever, said second lever likewise having a handle at one end cooperable with said first handle and a jaw member at the other end, the lower end of the latter be- 15 ing bent laterally toward and crossing the rearward edge portion of said first-named hook-like jaw and having a forwardly directed extension also rectangular in crosssection, curved in side elevation and tapered to form a second hook-like jaw, the latter being olfset and movable 20 toward and from the first-named jaw, and the bill portion being straight across and knife-like, said jaws being of the same cross-sectional dimension and having flat vertical left and right cheeks in a plane capable of bypassing each other, said second-named jaw being of a length greater than the length of the first-named jaw and the laterally bent jaw offsetting lower end of said second lever being spaced from and clear of the rearward longitudinal edge of the first lever to avoid collision therewith.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 499,637 6/1893 Knight 25428 650,186 5/1900 Maxson et al. 25428 919,370 4/ 1909 Lund 254--22 1,290,846 6/1919 Smith 25428 2,431,922 12/ 1947 Curtiss 25428 2,629,114 2/ 1953 Peterson 254--22 X WILLIAM FELDMAN, Primary Examiner.

MILTON S. MEHR, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US499637 *May 27, 1892Jun 13, 1893 Nannie knight executrix
US650186 *Dec 23, 1899May 22, 1900George D MaxsonPliers.
US919370 *Feb 1, 1908Apr 27, 1909Nels LundCombination tack hammer and puller.
US1290846 *Apr 16, 1917Jan 7, 1919Josiah SmithStaple-extracting tool.
US2431922 *Jun 19, 1944Dec 2, 1947Curtiss Frank RStaple remover
US2629114 *Feb 16, 1951Feb 24, 1953Peterson Theodore ECobbler's nippers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3895214 *Jul 5, 1973Jul 15, 1975Winter Robin LComponent removal tool
US3901293 *Apr 11, 1973Aug 26, 1975Cottone Joseph JGuitar stringing tools
US3934286 *Jan 16, 1975Jan 27, 1976Metzinger Robert EHand tool
US4635510 *Oct 25, 1985Jan 13, 1987Milbar CorporationPliers
US4869464 *Aug 23, 1988Sep 26, 1989Davidson Frank EHeavy duty staple remover
US5203785 *Oct 21, 1991Apr 20, 1993Symbrosis CorporationLaparoscopic hook scissors
US5636398 *Feb 22, 1995Jun 10, 1997Fike; Russel R.Adapted for constructing and repairing wire fences
US6098508 *Aug 6, 1998Aug 8, 2000Meritool CorporationPliers
US6314599Aug 9, 1999Nov 13, 2001Patrick James HayFastener pulling tool
DE10207208A1 *Feb 21, 2002Sep 25, 2003Ihd Inst Fuer HolztechnologieKlammerverbindung für Polstermöbel, Verfahren zur Herstellung einer derartigen Klammerverbindung sowie Verfahren zum Lösen einer derartigen Klammerverbindung
DE10207208B4 *Feb 21, 2002May 25, 2005IHD Institut für Holztechnologie Dresden gGmbHKlammerverbindung für Polstermöbel, Verfahren zur Herstellung einer derartigen Klammerverbindung sowie Verfahren zum Lösen einer derartigen Klammerverbindung
WO2000007777A1 *Aug 6, 1999Feb 17, 2000AmeritoolImproved pliers
Classifications
U.S. Classification254/28, D08/58, D08/48, 81/417, 81/424.5
International ClassificationB25C11/00, B25C11/02
Cooperative ClassificationB25C11/02
European ClassificationB25C11/02