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Publication numberUS3242942 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 29, 1966
Filing dateMar 20, 1963
Priority dateMar 20, 1963
Publication numberUS 3242942 A, US 3242942A, US-A-3242942, US3242942 A, US3242942A
InventorsGould Herman C
Original AssigneeGould Herman C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilators
US 3242942 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 29, 1966 H. c. GOULD 3,242,942

VENTILATORS Filed March 20. 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fl li-1..

TO INTAKE- MANH=OLD 44 INVENTOR.

a ERMAN C. GOULD Jig-1O 5 BY CR AiiAsE. 64 6 H15 EH 5- H. C. GOU LD VENTILATORS March 29, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 20, 1963 TO \NTAKE MAN \FOLD Z 5 4 4 94 26 625; a Q\CXIQ \\\V\ 4 5 0 3 Z a r L K a 6 1L 5;- a. 2M6 a Z 7 Mw/m 5 FROM GRAN KQASE.

INVQNTOR. HERMAN C. (jOULD BY Qwg M H15 EH United States Patent 3,242,942 VENTILATORS Herman C. Gould, 5048 N. Marine Drive, Chicago, Ill. Filed Mar. 20, 1963, Ser. No. 266,706 19' Claims. (Cl. 137-480) This invention relates to ventilators and, more particularly, to ventilators which are particularly well adapted for ventilating crankcases of internal combustion engines, and the like.

A primary object of the present invention is to afford a novel crankcase ventilator for internal combustion engines, and the like.

Another object is to afford a novel crankcase ventilator which is effective to draw vapors and gases from the crankcase of an internal combustion engine, and feed such vapors and gases into the combustion chambers of the engine at all speeds of operation of the engine. Internal combustion engines commonly operate with the vacuum in the intake manifolds thereof varying in a range of from three to twenty-one inches of mercury. When such engines are idling, the vacuum in the intake manifolds thereof commonly is from nineteen to twentyone inches of mercury. When such engines are operating under heavy load or heavy pull conditions, actually representing substantially stalled conditions, the vacuum in the intake manifolds thereof is commonly in the nature of three to five inches of mercury.

During the operation of such an engine there is a certain amount of blow-by from the combustion chambers into the crankcase of the engine. As a result, gases or vapors comprising a mixture of water vapors, air, and the more volatile hydrocarbon components of the gasoline and lubricating oils used in the engine, tend to accumulate in the crankcase of the engine. Unless such gases are purged from the crankcase they have a deleterious effect on the engine. Also, if they escape from the crankcase in the form they are then in, they undesirably pollute the atmosphere. In addition, unless they are returned to the combustion chamber they constitute a loss in fuel and lubrication. It is another object of the present invention to afford a novel crankcase ventilator which is operable in a novel and expeditious manner to feed such gases from the crankcase into the combustion chambers of such an engine, where they may be burned.

Another object is to afford a novel ventilator of the aforementioned type which is responsive in a novel and expeditious manner to the degree of vacuum in the intake manifold of such an engine.

Although there is less blow-by into the crankcase of an engine under idling conditions, and the like, than there is under heavy load conditions, the degree of vacuum in the inlet manifold is greater under idling conditions than under heavy load conditions. It is another object of the present invention to afford a novel crankcase ventilator of the aforementioned type, wherein the parts are constituted and arranged in such a manner as to compensate for such differences in vacuum in a novel and expeditious manner and to render the ventilator effective to efficiently ventilate such a crankcase under all operating conditions of the engine.

Crankcase ventilators which feed vapors and gases from the crankcases of internal combustion engines into the intake manifolds thereof have been heretofore known in the art. However, such ventilators as have been heretofore known in the art have commonly had several inherent disadvantages, such as, for example: being relatively large and cumbersome in size; not operating effectively and with maximum efficiency over the entire range of vacuum in the intake manifolds afforded by operation of such an engine from idling conditions to stall conditions; not being practical and eflicient in operation; or

being difficult and expensive to manufacture, and the like. It is an important object of the present invention to overcome such disadvantages.

Another object of the present invention is to afford a novel crankcase ventilator of the aforementioned type which will effectively protect against backfires.

Yet another object is to afford a novel crankcase ventilator of the aforementioned type which will automatically close if a backfire occurs either in the intake manifold or in the crankcase.

A further object is to afford a novel crankcase ventilator of the aforementioned type which is effective to prevent air or gases being drawn therethrough into the carburetor from the crankcase during starting of such an engine, until the engine is operating at a normal operational speed.

Another object is to afford a novel crankcase ventilator of the aforementioned type which is practical and efficient in operation and may be [readily and economically produced commercially.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which, by way of illustration, show preferred embodiments of the present invention and the principles thereof and what I now consider to be the best mode in which I have contemplated applying these principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principles may be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the present invention and the purview of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal view of a crankcase ventilator embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially along the line 22 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially along the line 3 3 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, detail sectional view of a portion of the ventilator shown in FIG. 1, but with certain parts disposed in different position;

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of a modified form of crankcase ventilator embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the ventilator shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the ventilator shown in FIG. 5, taken substantially along the line 7--7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged transverse sectional view taken substantially along the line 88 in FIG. 5; and

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary, detail sectional view of a portion of the ventilator shown in FIG. 7, with certain parts disposed in different position; and

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 7, but showing a modified form of the invention.

A crankcase ventilator 1, embodying the principles of the present invention, is shown in FIGS. 1-4, inclusive, of the drawings to illustrate the presently preferred embodiment of the present invention.

The crankcase ventilator 1 includes an elongated substantially straight, tubular-shaped body member 2 having an elongated passageway or bore 3 extending longitudinally therethrough along the longitudinal axis thereof. The body member 2 may be made of any suitable material such as, for example, stainless steel, and includes an elongated upper end portion 4 threaded axially into an elongated lower end portion 5, FIG. 1.

A resilient, metallic bellows 6 is mounted on the upper end of the body member 2. The bellows 6 includes a top plate 7 and a bottom plate 8, the bottom plate 8 having an externally threaded connecting nipple 9 projecting downwardly from the central portion thereof, FIG. 1. The connecting nipple 9 is threaded into an internally threaded enlarged portion 10 of the passageway 3 in the upper end portion of the upper end portion 4 of the body member 2. The bellows 6 has a chamber 11 therein extending between the top plate 7 and the lower plate 8, and the chamber 11 is directly connected to the passageway 3 in the upper portion 4 of the body member 2 by a passageway 12 extending through the connecting nipple 9. The passageway 3 in the upper end portion 4 of the body member 2, below the enlarged portion 10 thereof,

is preferably of substantially uniform diameter, and the passageway 12 in the connecting nipple 9 is preferably of this same diameter.

The passageway 3 in the lower end portion of the body member 2, below the upper end portion 4 thereof, has portions of various cross-sectional sizes; the lower portion 13 thereof being of the same diameter as the portion of the passageway 3 extending through the upper end portion 4 of the body member 2; an intermediate portion 14, immediately above the portion 13, being of somewhat larger diameter to thereby afford an upwardly fac ing shoulder 15 in the body portion 2 between the portions 13 and 14; and the upper portion 16, immediately above the portion 14, and immediately below the lower end of the upper end portion 4 of the body member 2, being of somewhat larger diameter than the portion 14, to thereby alford an upwardly facing shoulder 17 between the portions 14 and 16. The inner peripheral edge of the shoulder 17 together with the immediately underlying portion of the body portion 2 defines a relatively sharp corner which affords a lower valve seat 18 in the body member 2 for a purpose which will be discussed in greater detail presently.

The lower end of the upper end portion 4 of the body member 2 has a downwardly projecting annular ring on the lower face thereof disposed in immediately surrounding relation to the lower end of the passageway 3 in the upper portion 4 of the body member 2, the ring tapering inwardly and downwardly to a relatively sharp, downwardly facing annular edge to afford a relatively thin upper valve seat 19 for a purpose which will be discussed in greater detail presently.

An elongated valve 2% is mounted in the passageway 3 in laterally centered relation thereto, FIG. 1. The valve 20 includes a substantially straight, elongated shank or rod 21 having a threaded upper end portion 22 threaded into and extending upwardly through the top plate 7 on the bellows 6. A jam nut 23 is threaded onto the upper end of the threaded portion 22 of the rod 21 to secure the rod 21 in position in the top plate 7. V

The rod 21 extends downwardly from the top plate 7 through the chamber 11 in the bellows 6 into the intermediate portion 14 of the passageway 3 in the lower end portion 5 of the body member 2. A tapered valve head 24, of v substantially inverted frusto-conieal shape, is threaded onto the lower end portion of the rod 21, and is disposed in the portions 14 and 16 of the passageway 3, FIG. 1. As will be discussed in greater detail presently, the valve 20 is reciprocable longitudinally through the passageway 3 between a fully raised position, wherein the wide end 25 of the valve head 24 is disposed in sealing engagement with the upper valve seat 19, as shown in FIG. 1, and a fully lowered'position wherein the tapered side wall 26 of the valve head 24 is sealingly engaged with the lower valve seat 18, as shown in FIG. 4.

A compression coil spring 27 is disposed in'the chamber 11 of the bellows 6 between the top plate 7. and the bottom plate 8 thereof in position to yieldingly urge the bellows 6 toward fully extended position. The bellows 6, the spring 27, the body member 2, and the elongated valve 20 are so constituted and arranged that when the bellows 6 is in normal, unactuated position, the resiliency of the bellows 6 together with-the spring 27 is effective to yieldingly hold the wide face 25 of the valve head 24 in the aforementioned sealing engagement with the upper valve seat 19.

A connecting nipple 28 is formed on the lower end of the body member 2 around the lower portion 13 of the passageway 3, to afford a connecting member by which the lower end of the passageway 3 may be connected by a suitable conduit, such as, for example, a suitable tube or hose 29, into a suitable portion of the crankcase of an engine, such as, for example, the rocker box cover thereof. A threaded opening 30 extends radially through the side wall of the upper portion of the upper end portion 4 of the body member 2, and a suitable connecting member, such as a tubular connecting nipple 31 is threaded into the opening 30 and projects outwardly from the body member 2. The outer end portion of the nipple 31 may be connected by a suitable tube or hose 32 into the intake manifold of such an engine, not shown, to thereby connect the upper end portion of the passageway 3 into the intake manifold. The tubes or hoses 29 and 32 may be made of any suitable material such as stainless steel or rubber, and the connecting nipples 28 and 31 preferably have an inside diameter of no less than onefourth of an inch, and preferably between one-fourth and three-eighths of an inch.

It will be seen that with the connecting member 31 operatively connected to an intake manifold in the aforementioned manner, the vacuum in the manifold is effective to create a vacuum in the passageway 3 and, therefore in the chamber 11 of the bellows 6. The resiliency of the bellows 6 together with the strength of the spring 27 is such that when the vacuum or suction in the intake manifold is less than a'predetermined amount, the bellows 6 and the spring 27 are effective to hold the valve 20 in the aforementioned fully raised position, wherein the wide end 25 thereof is disposed in sealing engagement with the upper seat 19 to thereby close the passageway 3 at that point. When the vacuum in the intake manifold increases above the aforementioned predetermined amount, the correspondingly increased vacuum in the chamber 11 of the bellows 6 is effective to pull the top plate 7 thereof downwardly against the yielding urging of the'side walls of the bellows 6 and the spring 27, to

thereby move the valve 20 downwardly out of seating engagement with the valve 19. Such opening of the valve 21) opens the passageway 3 throughout the length thereof, to thereby apply a vacuum or suction to the crankcase of the engine connected by the conduit 29 to the lower end portion of the passageway 3. As the vacuum in the intake manifold increases, the top plate 7, and, therefore the valve 20 is progressively pulled downwardly by the correspondingly increased vacuum in the chamber 11 of the bellows 6, until, when the vacuum in the intake manifold has increased to an amount greater than another predetermined amount of vacuum, the valve 20 has been moved into fully lowered position, as shown in FIG. 4, wherein the tapered outer surface 26 thereof is disposed in sealing engagement with the lower valve seat 18, to thereby close the passageway 3 at that point.

I prefer that the resiliency of the bellows 6 and the strength of the spring 27 be such that when the vacuum in the intake manifold is less than three inches of mercury the valve 20 remain in sealing engagement with the valve seat 19, and when the vacuum or suction in the intake manifold is greater than 21 inches of mercury the valve 20 be seated against the valve seat 18, with the valve head 24 disposed in open position relative to the valve seats 18 and 20 when the manifold vacuum is between 3 and 21 inches of mercury.

The upward and outward taper of the side wall 26 of the valve head 25 is such that as the valve 20 is moved downwardly by increased vacuum in the intake manifold and, therefore, by the increased vacuum in the passageway 3 and the chamber 11 in the bellows 6, it progressively closes the opening between the side walls 26=of the valve head 25 and the valve seat 18.: With this construction, when the engine to which the crankcase ventilator 1 is operatively connected is idling, to thereby afford the aforementioned normal highest vacuum of twentyone inches in the intake manifold, the effective opening between the valve head 25 and the lower valve seat 18 is smallest, and as the vacuum in the intake manifold decreases, the effective opening between the valve head 25 and the valve seat 18 progressively increases. With the ventilator 1 constructed in the aforementioned manner, the rate of flow therethrough is relatively constant in all operating conditions of the engine to which it is attached between idling conditions of operation and normal maximum heavy load conditions of operation, with the flow of vapor and gases through the ventilator 1 under all such operating conditions being sufficient to maintain a negative pressure in the crankcase to which the ventilator 1 is connected. Hence, it will be seen that the novel crankcase ventilator 1 is effective to prevent the discharge of vapor and gases from a crankcase through the breather tubes, and the like, thereof, into the atmosphere during normal operation of such an engine, all such vapors and gases being drawn into the combustion chamber of the engine to be further burned.

In addition, it will be seen that with the novel crankcase ventilator constructed in the aforementioned manner, it is effective to prevent air from being drawn therethrough into the carburetor of the engine during normal starting of the latter, and is also effective to close the passageway 3 therethrough in the event of a backfire in either the intake manifold or the crankcase of an engine to which the ventilator 1 is connected. During starting of such engine, the starter is normally ineffective to turn the engine over at a speed sufiicient to create a vacuum in the intake manifold greater than three inches of mercury. Therefore, during normal starting operations, the

. valve 20 remains in fully raised position, wherein it is sealed against the seat 19, to thereby close the passageway 3 and prevent air being drawn into the carburetor from the crankcase of the engine until the engine is operating under its own power. Also, in the event of a backfire in either the intake manifold or the crankcase of an engine to which the crankcase ventilator 1 is operatively connected, the resultant increase in pressure in the passageway 3 is effective to quickly and firmly move the valve 20 into closed position, to thereby close the crankcase ventilator against the movement of air or gases therethrough between the intake manifold and the crankcase.

The relatively narrow area of contact between the valve head 24 and the valve seats.18 and 19, when the valve 20 is disposed in the aforementioned fully lowered and fully raised positions, respectively, insures that a substantially negligible differential in pressure above and below the valve head 24 is all that is necessary to overcome any negative pressure between the contacting surfaces of the valve 20 and the seats 18 and 19 during opening of the valve 20 from closed position.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the novel intake ventilator shown in FIGS. l4, inclusive, of the drawings is effective to efficiently ventilate the crankcase of an internal combustion engine during normal operation thereof, so as to maintain a negative pressure within the crankcase of the engine at all times during such normal operation.

Also, it will be seen that the novel crankcase ventilator 1 may be readily and economically produced commercially.

In FIGS. 59, inclusive, of the drawings a modified form of crankcase ventilator 41, embodying the principles of the present invention, is shown.

The crankcase ventilator 41 includes a body member 42 "having a substantially cylindrical-shaped intermediate portion 43 clamped between a top plate 44 and a bottom plate 45, FIGS. 5 and 7. The intermediate portion 43 may be made of any suitable material such as, for example, stainless steel, but is preferably made from a suitable transparent material, such as, for example, a suitable glass or clear plastic, to thereby afford a sight-glass type of construction.

The intermediate portion 43 is preferably of uniform diameter throughout its length, and is open at its top and bottom. Sealing gaskets 46 and 47 are mounted on the top and bottom, respectively, of the intermediate portion 43, and the top plate 44 and the bottom plate 45 are clamped against the sealing gaskets 46 and 47, respectively, by suitable fastening members such as bolts or screws which extend downwardly through the top plate 44 and are threaded into the bottom plate 45, FIG. 7. The plates 44 and 45 are mounted on the respective ends of the intermediate portion 43 in covering relation thereto. The top plate 44 has an opening 49 extending through the radial center thereof, and the bottom plate 45 likewise has an opening or passageway 50 extending through the radial center thereof. Suitable connecting members, such as, for example, tubular connecting nipples 51 and 52 are threaded into and project outwardly from the passageways 49 and 50, respectively, FIG. 7, for a purpose which will be discussed in greater detail presently.

The top plate 44 has a boss 52 projecting downwardly from the central portion thereof in inwardly spaced relation to the outer periphery of the top plate 44, and in surrounding relation to the lower end of the passageway 49. An elongated, substantially straight sleeve, having an upper end 54 and a lower end 55 is mounted on the boss 52 with the upper end 54 welded or otherwise suitably secured to the boss 52 in surrounding relation thereto, and with the lower end 55 projecting downwardly toward, and terminating in upwardly spaced relation to, the lower plate 45 for a purpose which will be discussed in greater detail presently.

The sleeve 53 is disposed in axial alignment with the passageways 49 and 5t and a hollow piston or valve member 56, which is of upwardly and inwardly tapering, substantially frusto-conical shape, is disposed in the body member 42 with the small upper end 57 thereof projecting upwardly into the sleeve 53, FIG. 7. The upper end 57 of the valve member 56 is open, and the larger lower 7 end 58 thereof is closed. A compression coil spring is mounted in the body member 42 with the upper end thereof disposed in abutting engagement with the lower face of the boss 52, and the lower end thereof projecting downwardly into the valve member 56 into abutting engagement with the upper face of the lower end 58 thereof. An annular valve seat 60 is formed integrally with and projects upwardly from the upper face of the bottom plate 45 of the body member 42 in surrounding relation to the upper end of the passageway 50. The body member 42, the spring 59, and the valve member 56 are so constituted and arranged that when the connecting nipples 51 and 52 are both open to the atmosphere, the spring 59 is effective to hold the bottom end 58 of the valve 56 in sealing engagement with the upper face of the valve 50. As is shown in FIG. 7, the valve seat 60 preferably tapers upwardly and inwardly to a relatively sharp edge, so that the engagement between the bottom wall 58 of the valve 56 and the valve seat 60 is substantially a line contact.

The sleeve 53 and the valve '56 are of such size that when the valve 56 is disposed in fully lowered position, wherein it is seated against the valve seat 60, as shown in FIG. 7, the side wall portion 61 of the valve 56 is disposed in inwardly spaced relation to the sleeve 53, but when the sleeve 53 is disposed in fully raised position, as shown in FIG. 9, the bottom wall 58 is disposed in upwardly spaced relation to the valve seat 60, and the side wall portion 61 of the valve 56 is disposed in sealing engagement with the valve seat 62 afforded by the inner peripheral corner of the lower end 55 of the sleeve 53.

It will be seen that with this construction, when the crankcase ventilator 41 is in assembled condition, the coupling member 51,-the passageway 49, the sleeve 53, the interior of the intermediate portion 43 of the body member 42, and the passageway 50 and the coupling member 52 afford a passageway 63- which extends axially through the entire length of the crankcase ventilator 41. The coupling members 51 and 52 afford connecting members by which the passageway 63 may be connected into the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, and into a suitable portion of the crankcase of the engine, such as, the rocker box cover thereof, respectively, by suitable conduits such as, for example, suitable tubes or hoses 64 and 65, respectively. The internal diameter of the coupling members 51 and 52 is preferably not less than one-fourth of an inch, and preferably is between one-fourth and t-hree-eighths of an inch. With the crankcase ventilator 41 so connected to an internal combustion engine, the vacuum produced in the intake manifold of the engine during normal operation thereof, creates a corresponding vacuum in the passageway 63, so that when the passageway 63 is open throughout its length, vapors and gases are drawn from the crankcase of the engine through the tube 65', the crankcase ventilator 41, and the tube 64 into the intake manifold of the engine.

The strength of the spring 59 is such that when the vacuum in the intake manifold to which the upper end portion of the passageway 63 is operatively connected is less than three inches of mercury, the spring 59 is effective to hold the valve member 56 in sealing engagement with the valve seat 60; when the vacuum in the intake manfold is greater than twenty-one inches of mercury, the spring 59 is ineffective to hold the valve member 56 out of the aforementioned sealing engagement with the valve seat 62; and when the vacuum in the intake manifold is between three inches of mercury and twenty-one inches of mercury, the spring 59 is effective to hold the valve member 56 in an intermediate position, wherein it is not disposed in sealing engagement with either of the valve seats 60 or 62, and with the valve member 56 being progressive-1y raised toward the valve seat 6 2 as the vacuum increases in the intake manifold between three inches and twenty-one inches of mercury. The taper of the valve 56 is such that as it moves upwardly from the valve seat 60 toward the valve seat 62,- the space between the side wall portions 61 of the valve 56 and the valve seat 62 becomes progressively smaller. Hence, it will be seen that as the vacuum in the intake manifold increases, the effective space between the valve member 56 and the valve seat 62 decreases. With this construction, the rate of flow of air and gases from the crankcase to which the tube 65 is connected into the manifold to which the tube 64 is connected is relatively constant throughout the normal operating conditions of the engine, and, in any event, the rate of flow is sufficient that under all normal operating conditions, of the engine, a negative pressure is maintained in the crankcase thereof so that the air and gases therein will not flow outwardly through the breather tubes, and the like, thereof.

With this construction, the crankcase ventilator is effective to prevent the passage of air and gases therethrough from the crankcase into the intake manifold of an engine to which it is operatively connected during the starting of the engine. As previously mentioned a starter is normally ineffective to turn over an internal combustion engine at a rate of speed sufficient to create a vacuum in excess of three inches of mercury in the intake manifold.

Inasmuch as the valve 56 is not moved away from the valve 60 until the vacuum in the intake manifold is in excess of three inches of mercury, it will be seen that no airmay pass through the crankcase ventilator 41 into the carburetor of the engine until the engine has started normal operation.

Also, it will be seen that with this construction the crankcase ventilator 41 is effective to automatically close in the event of a backfire either in the intake, manifold or in the crankcase of an engine to which the ventilator is connected. Thus, for example, if the valve 56 should be in open position, and a backfire occurs in the intake manifold, it will be seen that the increased pressure in the intake manifold and, therefore, in the upper end portion of the passageway 63- is effective to quickly and firmly seat the valve 56 against the seat 61'. On the other hand, in the event of a backfire in the crankcase to which the lower end portion of the passageway 63 is connected, while the valve 56 is disposed in open position, the increased pressure in the crankcase and, therefore, in the lower end portion of the passageway 63 is effective to quickly and firmly move the valve 56 into seating engagement with the valve seat 62.

It will be seen that, as in the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 1-4, when the valve 56 is seated against either of the valve seats 60 or 62, the engagement therebetween is substantially a line contact. With this construction the force necessary to be applied to the valve 56 to overcome any negative pressure which may exist between the contacting surfaces of the valve 56 and either of the seats 60 or 62 is negligible.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the novel crankcase ventilator 41 shown in FIGS. 5-9, inclusive, of the drawings is effective to efliciently ventilate the crankcase of an internal combustion engine during normal operation thereof, so as to maintain a negative pressure within the crankcase of the engine at all times during normal operation.

Also, it will be seen that the novel crankcase ventilator 41 may be readily and economically produced commercially.

In FIG. 10 of the drawings an'other modified form of crankcase ventilator 71, embodying the principles of the present invention, is shown.

The crankcase ventilator 71 is of the same general type as the ventilator 41 shown in FIGS. 5-9, inclusive, except that it'is inverted; a metallic bellows of the type embodied in the crankcase ventilator 1 shown in FIGS. 14, inclusive, is mounted on the top thereof; the intake manifold connection to the interior of the crankcase ventilator 71 extends radially through the top plate thereof rather than axially therethrough; and the valve member of the crankcase ventilator 71 is disposed in fully raised position when the vacuum in the intake manifold is lowest, and is disposed in fully lowered position when the vacuum in the intake manifold is highest.

In the crankcase ventilator 71 shown in FIG. 10 parts which are the same as parts shown in FIGS. 1 to 9, inclusive, are indicated by the same reference numerals, and parts which are similar to, but have been substituted for, parts are indicated by the same reference numerals as the similar parts, with the suffix a added thereto.

In the crankcase ventilator 71 the top plate 45a of the body member 42a is of the same construction as the bottom plate 45 of the crankcase 41 shown in FIGS. 5-9, except that it has an opening or passageway 72 extending radially outwardly from the passageway 50 in the plate 45a. A metallic bellows 6, having a connecting nipple 9 on the lower end thereof is mounted on the top of the upper. plate 45a with the nipple Q threaded into the passageway 56'.

A valve rod 21a is secured to the top plate 7 of the bellows 6 and extends downwardly through the chamber 11 of the bellows 6 and the passageway 50 into the interior of the body member 4201. The lower end portion of the rod 21a is threaded into the wall 58 of the valve member 56. In the ventilator 71 the wall 58 is the top wall of the valve member 56, the valve member 56 in this ventilator being in inverted position from that shown in FIGS. 59.

A compression coil spring 27 is mounted in the bellows 6 in position to urge the bellows upwardly toward expanded position. The resiliency of the bellows 6 and the strength of the spring 27 is such that when both the nipple 52, mounted on the aforementioned passageway 50, and the nipple 51 mounted in the passageway 49, which extends through the lower plate 48a of the body member 42a, are open to atmosphere the valve member 56 is held upwardly in sealing engagement with the valve seat 60, which projects downwardly from the lower face of the top plate 45a in surrounding relation to the lower end of the passageway 50.

The sleeve 53 mounted on the lower plate 44 of the body member 42 projects upwardly toward the upper plate 45a, and, as in the crankcase ventilator 41, the valve 56 is reciprocable between sealing engagement with the valve seat 69, as shown in solid lines in FIG. 10, sealing engagement with the valve seat 62, as shown in broken lines in FIG. 10.

The resiliency of the bellows 6 together with the strength of the spring 27 is such that when the vacuum in the intake manifold to which the coupling member 52 of the crankcase ventilator 71 is connected is substantially less than three inches of mercury, the valve 56 is held in seating engagement the upper valve seat 60 on the top plate 45a; and when the vacuum in the intake manifold is greater than twenty-one inches of mercury, whereby the vacuum in the chamber 11' of the bellows 6 is correspondingly increased, the bellows 6 and the spring 27 are.inelfective to hold the valve member 56 out of seating engagement with the lower valve seat 62.

Under vacuum conditions between three inches and twenty-one inches of mercury in the intake manifold to which, the crankcase ventilator 71 is connected, the valve member 56 of the ventilator 71, like the valve member 56 of the ventilator 41, is disposed in intermediate positions between the valve seats 60 and 62, to thereby permit vapor and gas to flow from the crankcase to which the tube 64 is connected, through the tube 64, the passageway 63, and the passageway 72 to the intake manifold to which the nipple 52 is operatively connected.

As the vacuum in the intake manifold to which the crankcase ventilator 71 is operatively connected increases from three inches of mercury toward twenty-one inches of mercury, the valve member 56 moves downwardly further into the sleeve 53 to thereby progressively restrict the space between the side wall portion 61 of the valve member 56 and the valve seat 62, to thereby tend to maintain a relatively constant flow gases and vapor from the crankcase into the intake manifold during norinal operation of the engine to which the crankcase ventilator 71 is operatively connected.

As in the forms of the invention shown in FIGS. 19 the crankcase ventilator 71 is effective to maintain a sufficient flow of gases and vapor from the crankcase to the intake manifold of the engine to which it is operatively connected during normal operation of the engine between idling and heavy load conditions, that a negative pressure is maintained in the crankcase. Also, it will be seen that with the crankcase ventilator 71 constructed in the manner disclosed herein, it is effective to prevent air from flowing therethrough from the crankcase of such an engine to the intake manifold thereof during starting of the engine until the engine is operating under normal conditions; and is effective to quickly and firmly move the valve member 56 thereof into closed position upon a backfire in either the intake manifold or the crankcase of the engine.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the crankcase ventilator 71 is effective to maintain a negative pressure in the crankcase of an engine to which it is operatively connected, under normal operating conditions of the engme.

Also, it will be seen that the novel crankcase ventilator 71 may be readily and economically produced commercially.

Thus, while I have illustrated and dwcribed the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that these are capable of variation and modification, and I therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such changes and alterations as fall within the purview of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A crankcase ventilator comprising (a) an elongated body portion having (1) a longitudinally extending passageway therein for directing gases from the crankcase of an internal combustion engine to the intake manifold of said engine,

(b) two valve seats (1) disposed in facing relation to each other (2) in encircling relation to respective axially spaced portions of said passageway,

(c) a valve member (1) reciprocable axially of said passageway between said two valve seats, (d) said valve member having (1) one end portion movable into engagement with one of said valve seats to close said passageway thereat, and

(2) a tapered other end portion movable into and against the other of said valve seats for progressively closing said passageway at said other valve seat during movement of said valve member toward said other valve seat, and

(e) means for moving said valve member between said seats in accordance with pressure variations in such a manifold, said means including (1) a resilient bellows having a chamber therein in communication with said passageway and operatively connected to said valve member in position to urge said valve member toward said one seat, and

(2) a spring mounted in said bellows and operatively connected to said valve member in position to urge said valve member toward said one seat.

2. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 1, and in which (a) said other valve seat comprises one end of a sleeve projecting into said passageway in spaced relation to the sides of said body portion. 3. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 1, and in which (a) said one valve seat comprises (1) an annular member having (a) an annular tapered edge (1) facing axially of said passageway (2) toward said one end portion of said valve member. 4. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 3, and in which (a) said one end portion of said one valve member is substantially flat. 5. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 3, and in which (a) said valve member 1) is substantially frusto-conical in shape, and (2) said one end portion is (a) larger than said other end portion, and (b) is substantially flat. 6. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 5, and (a) which includes (1) second means connected to one end of said passageway for connecting said passageway to such a manifold, and

(2) third means connected to the other end of said passageway for connecting said passageway to such a chankcase, and

(b) in which said one valve seat faces toward said third means.

7. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 5, and (a) which includes (1) second means connected to one end of said passageway for connecting said passageway to such a manifold, and (2) third means connected to the other end of said passageway for connecting said passageway to such a crankcase, and

(b) in which said one valve seat faces toward said second means.

8. A crankcase ventilator as defined in claim 3, and

in which (a) said other valve seat comprises an annular end edge of tubular means defining the outer periphery of a portion of said passageway.

9. A crankcase ventilator for venting the crankcase of an internal combustion engine to the intake manifold of said engine comprising (a) a substantially straight elongated body portion having 1) an upper end,

(2) a lower end, and

(3) an elongated passageway extending longitudinally therethrough,

(b) means at each end of said body portion for operatively connecting (1) the upper end of-said passageway to such a manifold and (2) the lower end of said passageway to such a crankcase, respectively,

(c) two annular members in said body member (1) each having a relatively sharp annular edge,

(2) disposed around respective portions of said passageway with said edges disposed in axially spaced facing relation to each other between said means,

(d) one of said annular members being disposed closer to the first-mentioned means in the upper end of said body member than the other of said annular members,

(e) a resilient metallic bellows (1) mounted on top of said body member, and (2) having a chamber therein in direct communication with the upper end of said passagey, (f) valve means (1) mounted in said body member, and (2) extending upwardly through said bellows (g) said valve means having (1) a valve head disposed between said annular members, and (2) reciprocable between (a) a position effective to sealingly engage said edge of said one annular member, and (b') another position effective to sealingly engage said edge of said other annular member,

(h) a spring mounted in said bellows,

(i) said spring and said bellows being operatively connected to said valve means in position to urge said valve head toward said sealing engagement with said one annular portion,

(j) said valve head being,

(1) of substantially inverted frusto-conical shape,

and

(2) extending into said other annular portion in all operative positions of said valve means,

(k) said bellows and said spring being operable to move said valve head between said annular portions in accordance with pressure variations in said manifold.

10. A crankcase ventilator for venting the crankcase of an internal combustion engine to the intake manifold of said engine comprising (a) a substantially straight elongated body portion having 12 (1) an upper end, (2) a lower end, and ,j (3) an elongated passageway extending longitudinally therethrough, v

(b) means at each end of said-body portion for operatively connecting (1) the upper end of said passageway to such a manifold and (2) the lower end of said passageway to such a crankcase, respectively,

(c) an annular member (1) having an upwardly facing, substantially sharp edge,

(2) extending around a lower portion of said passageway,

(d) an elongated sleeve (l) defining a portion of said passageway,

(2) mounted in said body member in spaced relation to the lateralsides thereof, and (3) having a lower end (a) disposed in axial alignment with said annular member, (b') in upwardly spaced relation thereto (e) a substantially frusto-conical shaped valve member mounted in said passageway (f) said valve member (1) projecting upwardly into said sleeve, and (2) being vertically reciprocable between (a) a position effective to sealingly engage said edge of said annular member, and (b) a position effective to sealingly engage the inner peripheral'portion of said lower end of said sleeve (g) a spring mounted in said passageway in position to urge said valve member toward said engagement with said edge of said annular member,

(h) said valve member being movable between said annular member and said bottom of said sleeve in accordance with pressure variations in said manifold.

11. A crankcase ventilator for venting the crankcase of an internal combustion engine to the intake manifold of said engine comprising (a) an elongated body portion having (1) a passageway extending longitudinally therethrough,

(b) means at one end of said body portion for operatively connecting one end of said passageway to such a manifold,

(c) second means at the other end of saidbody portion for operatively connecting the other end of said passageway to such a crankcase,

((1) two valve seats in said passageway in axially spaced, facing relation to each other between said means,

(e) one of said valve seats being disposed closer to said first-mentioned means than the other of said valve seats,

(f) said other valve .seat comprising an end edge of a sleeve projecting into said body member in spaced relation to the lateral sides thereof,

(g) a substantially inverted frusto-conical-shaped valve member projecting into. said other valve seat and reciprocable in said passageway between closing engagement with said one valve seat and closing engagement with said other valve seat, and

(h) a bellows having a chamber therein in direct communication with said one end of said passageway,

(i) a spring mounted in said bellows,

(j) said sprin and said bellows being operatively connected to said valve member. in position to urge said valve member toward said one valve seat,

(k) said resilient means being (1) sufficiently strong to holdsaid valve member in engagement with said one valve seat against 13 'a manifold vacuum of substantially less than three inches of mercury,

(2) insufficiently strong to hold said valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially more than three inches of mercury,

( 3) sufliciently strong to hold said valve member but of engagement with said other valve member against a manifold vacuum of substantially less than twenty-one inches of mercury, and

(4) insufficiently strong to hold said valve member out of engagement with said other valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially more than twenty-one inches of mercury.

12. A crankcase ventilator for venting the crankcase of an internal combustion engine to the intake manifold of said engine comprising (a) an elongated body portion having (1) a passageway extending longitudinally therethrough,

(b) means at one end of said body portion for operatively connecting one end of said passageway to such a manifold,

(c) second means at the other end of said body portion for operatively connecting the other end of said passageway to such a crankcase,

(d) two valve seats in said passageway in axially spaced, facing relation to each other between said means,

(e) one of said valve seats being disposed closer to said first-mentioned means than the other of said valve seats,

(f) an elongated valve member (1) mounted in said passageway and (2) reciprocable longitudinally therein between closing engagement with respective ones of said seats,

(g) a bellows having a chamber therein in direct communication with said one end of said passageway, and

(h) a spring mounted in said bellows,

(i) said spring and said bellows being operatively connected to said valve member in position to urge said valve member toward said one valve seat,

(i) said bellows and said spring being (1) sufficiently strong to holdsaid valve member in engagement with said one valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially less than three inches of mercury,

(2) insufficiently strong to hold said valve member in engagement with said one valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially more than three inches of mercury,

(3) sufficiently strong to hold said valve member out of engagement with said other valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially less than twenty-one inches of mercury, and

(4) insufiiciently strong to hold said valve member out of engagement with said other valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially more than twenty-one inches of mercury.

13. A crankcase ventilator for venting the crankcase of an internal combustion engine to the intake manifold of said engine comprising (a) an elongated body portion having (1) a passageway extending longitudinally therethrough,

(b) means at one end of said body portion for operatively connecting one end of said passageway to such a manifold,

(c) second means at the other end of said body portion for operatively connecting the other end of said passageway to such a crankcase,

((1) two valve seats in said passageway in axially spaced, facing relation to each other between said means,

(e) one of said valve seats being disposed closer to said first-mentioned means than the other of said valve seats,

(f) a portion of said passageway being defined by a sleeve mounted in said body member,

(g) one of said valve seats comprising an end edge of said sleeve, I A r (h) a substantially frusto-conical shaped valve member reciprocable in said passageway between closing engagement with respective ones of said valve seats (i) a spring l) mounted in said sleeve and v (2) operatively connected to said valve member in position to urge said valve member toward said other valve seat,

(j) said spring being (1) s-ufliciently strong to hold said valve member in engagement with said other valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially less than three inches of mercury,

(2) insufliciently strong to hold said valve member in engagement with said other valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially more than three inches of mercury,

(3) sufficiently strong to hold said valve member out of engagement with said one valve member against a manifold vacuum of substantially less than twenty-one inches of mercury, and

(4) insufficiently strong to hold said valve member out of engagement with said one valve seat against a manifold vacuum of substantially more than twenty-one inches of mercury.

14. An improved flow controller for a crankcase ventilator of the type utilizing the pressure drop from an intake manifold to effect the movement of gaseous fluids from within the crankcase into the intake manifold, said improved flow controller comprising in combination: casing means defining a suction chamber having an intake opening and an outlet opening therefrom, said outlet opening adapted to be connected to an intake manifold to partake of the pressure drop therein, a valve member arranged for cooperation with said intake opening to move toward and away therefrom to obtain a variable control of the flow of gas through said intake opening into said suction chamber for flow therefrom through said outlet, bellows means responsive to the pressure drop in the manifold and connected to said valve member to cause said valve member and bellows to move in unison, and a spring biasing said valve member in one direction while an increase in the pressure drop from the intake manifold tends to bias the valve member in the opposite direction and opposing the direction of flow of gaseous fluids through the intake opening.

15. A device as set forth in claim 14 wherein the spring is housed within the bellows means.

16. A flow controller as set forth in claim 14, wherein said valve member has a tapering shape thatcooperates with said intake opening to provide a flow passageway therebetween of variable area.

17. A flow controller as set forth in claim 14, wherein said valve member is an elongated piston whose longitudinal axis is arranged coaxially of the intake opening and said piston providing an axially tapering portion which includes an upstream end that extends through and upstream of the intake opening.

18. A flow controller as set forth in claim 14, wherein said valve member is a tapered elongated piston whose upstream end enters into and extends upstream and coaxially of the intake opening, said outlet opening being arranged so that its axis is in a plane substantially perpendicular to the axis of said intake opening, and the tapered portion of said valve member being exposed to a pressure from the mass flow of gaseous fluid through said intake opening and cooperating with the intake opening to provide a variable area for accommodating the mass flow of gaseous fluid.

19. A flow controller as set forth in claim 14, wherein said valve member is an elongatedtapcring piston whose longitudinal axis is arranged coaxially of the intake opening and whose small end is arranged to extend through and upstream of said intake opening, and said tapering piston defining an exterior pressure face with a circular periphery that is concentric with the intake opening and which is arranged to be exposed to the pressure of the mass flow of gaseous fluids from the crankcase.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Morgan 137-483 X Beckett 1231 19 X McMullen 123-119 Beardsley 123-119 Helwig 123-119 Lowther 1231 19 10 M. CARY NELSON, Primary Examiner.

HENRY T. KLINKSIEK, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1543264 *Sep 21, 1923Jun 23, 1925Morgan Porter AVacuum-controlled regulator
US2592380 *Dec 11, 1947Apr 8, 1952Carey Beckett RonaldCrankcase ventilator valve
US2716398 *Nov 21, 1951Aug 30, 1955Gen Motors CorpCrankcase ventilation valve incorporating flame arrester
US2906252 *Aug 28, 1956Sep 29, 1959Int Harvester CoCrankcase ventilating system for internal combustion engines
US3051151 *Aug 28, 1961Aug 28, 1962Carl HelwigCrankcase ventilator for automotive vehicles
US3105477 *Jan 8, 1962Oct 1, 1963Novo Ind CorpCrankcase valve ventilating system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3677237 *Dec 21, 1970Jul 18, 1972Poul E HansenAuxiliary air valve
US4243530 *Dec 4, 1978Jan 6, 1981Dr. Eduard Fresenius Chemisch-Pharmazeutische Industrie Kg, Apparatebau KgHaemofiltration with filtrate flow control by adjustable venting
US4988097 *Apr 27, 1988Jan 29, 1991Actiwear, Ltd.Combination exercise and refreshment device
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/480, 137/510, 137/483
International ClassificationF01M13/02, F01M13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01M13/023
European ClassificationF01M13/02N2B