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Publication numberUS3243186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 29, 1966
Filing dateJun 8, 1964
Priority dateJun 8, 1964
Publication numberUS 3243186 A, US 3243186A, US-A-3243186, US3243186 A, US3243186A
InventorsShelby Johnson
Original AssigneeShelby Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golfer's head movement indicator
US 3243186 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 29, 1966 s. JOHNSON GOLFER'S HEAD MOVEMENT INDICATOR Filed June 8, 1964 i-iMVIIlIII-iniill n! INVENTOR. SHE L B Y JOHNSON United States Patent 3,243,186 GOLFERS HEAD MOVEMENT INDICATDR Shelby Johnson, 660 62nd St., San Diego, Calif. 92114 Filed June 8, 1964, Ser. No. 373,303 6 Claims. (Cl. 273183) This invention relates to a device which signals to a golf player when his head moves during the swing of the golf club thereby indicating to the golfer that an error in his swing is being committed.

An object of my invention is to provide a device which notifies the golfer of a mistaken head movement in any part of the swing.

A further object is to provide such a device which does not in any way interfere with or distract from a proper golf swing.

Afurther object is to provide such a device which is easily and quickly adapted for use in all places and for allpersons regardless of size.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide a device of the above type which is of simple construction, inexpensive to manufacture and efficient to operate.

For other 'objectsof and for a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following de tailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a cross-sectional view of the body portion of my device FIGURE 2 is a detailed view of body member FIGURE 3 is a perspective view showing the device in use.

Referring to the drawing showing the preferred structure and in which like numbers represent like parts, in FIGURE 1 the number 1 represents a head connector. This is preferably attached bands of metal or plastic which fit comfortably on the head of the golfer. This portion extends over the top of the head and partially down the sides for a snug fit. Alternative forms such as a cap or bowl may be used. Item 1 is secured to contact rod 4. There is threaded engagement 2 through adapter 3 which secures the connector to the rod. Said rod is an electrical conductor, preferably aluminum, of one-fourth inch in diameter of the length of approximately thirty inches. At the opposite end of said rod is swivel 7 of the ball and socket type. Electric wire contact 6 permits connecting the rod to contact 11 by conventional insulatedelectric wire. A connecting block 9 serves as a base for securing swivel 7 and contact 11. The connecting block is preferably cylindrical in shape of two different diameters and of solid material. It is an electrical conductor preferably aluminum. It is provided with a drilled hole lengthwise to contain said insulated w1re.

A body member 19 shown in FIGURE 2 is also of cylindrical construction. It is preferably of three different diameters with the center portion the same diameter as the larger diameter of said connecting block. A section of said body member is cut-away to the center thereof to provide a saddle 25 to receive signal 16. Such signal is preferably a common electromagnetic vibrator of sufficient size to be clearly audible to the golfer. This vibrator, commonly called buzzer is connected to the body member 19 to retain it in place and its electromagnet is connectecd to screw 18 by insulated wire as illustrated. To complete the electrical circuit insulated wire contacts the signal energizer, preferably a plurality of one and one-half volt flashlight battery 1.2 (four in number). This may be accomplished by ordinary spiral spring 14 at the base thereof. Wire 15 may be connected thereto as part of the circuit.

A conventional pushbutton switch 28 is put in the 3,243,186 Patented Mar. 29, 1966 "ice electrical circuit with wire 10 so that the circuit is broken when the device is not in use. A main housing 13 encloses some of said members as is illustrated. Said housing is preferably formed as an aluminum tube of inside diameter 1 inches and preferably sixteen inches in length. It is slotted at one end thereof to accept switch 28 and provided with orifice 17 as a sound outlet. It snugly surrounds a portion of member 19 and is secured thereto by screw 20 at one end thereof. At the opposite end thereof block 9 snugly fits therein and is secured thereto with screw 8.

An important part of my invention is contact tube 5.

1 This tube is formed of an electrical conductor, preferably aluminum. Formed as /3 inch diameter tubing. EX- perience shows that an overall length of 12 inches operates best. The tube surrounds rod'4 and one end thereof is held secure to the connecting block by snugly fitting over it. Screw 8 secures it.

A stationary support 27 may be provided as a vertical standard. This support may be portable, consisting of a vertical tube or pipe with a rotatably heavy base as illustrated; of course, many and various arrangements may be resorted to without departing from the scope of my invention. The described parts of my device are connected to the stationary support 27, preferably by clamp 21 provided with ears and orifices to secure a corresponding ear and orifice on the end of member 19. Threaded bolt 22, washer 23, and wingnut 24 complete the obvious and adjustable support arrangement.

The operation of my device is as follows:

A golfer raises clamp 21 to the approximate height of his head. Connector 1 rests upon his head. Nut 24 is adjusted so that the connector rests comfortably when the golfer is in a position to hit the golf ball. The swing is executed in the conventional manner; the usual club and ball may be actually used. If during the swing the head moves, rod 4 will be caused to contact the end of tube 5 at point 26. This will complete the electrical circuit and cause the buzzer to sound. In this manner the golfer will know he has moved his head.

The sensitivity of the device is controlled by sliding the adapter 3 and connector 1 along rod 4. As the distance between point 26 and adapter 3 becomes greater, the greater the distance the head may move before electrical contact is made. Beginners may use the head connector near the end of the rod and as skill increases the connector may be moved towards point 26.

Although preferred embodiments of the device are as illustrated and described, it is to be understood that further modifications and changes in the details of construction that may be resorted to will fall within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A golf training device to indicate head movements of a golfer during a golf swing, comprising a vertical standard, a laterally extending arm vertically adjustably mounted on the vertical standard adjacent the upper end thereof, said arm being of tubular form and including an electrical conductor rod projecting from its outer end, a head-embracing member at the outer end of the conductor rod, a conductor sleeve at the outer end of the tubular arm surrounding the conductor rod for a portion of its length and normally spaced therefrom, a buzzer in the tubular arm and a source of contained electrical energy in the tubular arm in communication with the buzzer, conductor sleeve and rod and rendered active by movement of the head of the golfer to cause the conductor rod to contact the conductor sleeve for energizing the buzzer.

2. A golf training device as in claim 1, wherein the cylindrical member is mounted in the inner end of the tubular arm and has a cut-away portion intermediate its ends for the mounting of the buzzer.

3. A golf training device to indicate head movements of a golfer during a golf swing, comprising a vertical standard, a laterally extending arm vertically adjustably mounted on the vertical standard adjacent the upper end thereof, said arm being of tubular form and including an electrical conductor rod projecting from its outer end, a head-embracing member at the outer end of the conductor rod, a conductor sleeve at the outer end of the tubular arm surrounding the conductor rod for a portion of its length and normally spaced therefrom, a buzzer in the tubular'arm and a source of contained electrical energy in the tubular arm in communication with the buzzer, conductor sleeve and rod and rendered active by movement of the head of the golfer to cause the conductor rod to contact the conductor sleeve for energizing the buzzer, a sol-id cylindrical block at the outer end of the tubular arm and projecting therefrom for the support of the contact sleeve, the source of electrical energy comprising storage batteries in the tubular arm arranged betweenthe aforesaid cylindrical member and cylindrical block and a conductor wire extending from the terminal end of the outermost storage battery and innermost end of the conductor rod.

4. A golf training device as in claim 1, wherein the cylindrical member is mounted in the inner end of the tubular arm and has a cut-away portion intermediate its ends for the mounting of the buzzer, a solid cylindrical block at the outer end of the tubular arm and projecting therefrom for the support of the contact sleeve, the source of electrical energy comprising storage batteries in the tubular arm arranged between the aforesaid cylindrical member and cylindrical block and a conductor wire extending from the terminal end of the outermost storage battery and the innermost end of the conductor rod.

5. A golf training device to indicate head movements of a golfer during a golf swing, comprising a vertical standard, a laterally extending arm vertically adjustably mounted on the'vertical standard adjacent the upper end thereof, said arm being of tubular form and including an electrical conduct-or rod projecting from its outer end, a head-embracing member at the outer end of the conductor rod, a conductor sleeve at the outer end of the tubular arm surrounding the conductor rod for a portion of its ledgth and normally spaced therefrom, a buzzer in the tubular arm and a source of contained electrical energy in the tubular arm in communication with the buzzer, conductor sleeve and rod and rendered active by movement of the head of the golfer to cause the conductor rod to contact the conductor sleeve for energizing the buzzer, a solid cylindrical block at the outer end of the tubular arm and projecting therefrom for the support of the contact sleeve, the source of electrical energy comprising storage batteries in the tubular arm arranged between the aforesaid cylindrical member and cylindrical block and a conductor wire extending from the terminal end of the outermost storage battery and innermost end of the conductor rod, and a swivel connection between the inner end of the conductor rod and the outer end of the cylindrical block.

6. A golf training device as in claim 1, wherein the cylindrical member is mounted in the inner end of the tubular arm and has a cut-away portion intermediate its ends for the mounting of the buzzer, a solid cylindrical block at the outer end of the tubular arm and projecting therefrom for the support of the contact sleeve, the source of electrical energy comprising storage batteries in the tubular arm arranged between the aforesaid cylindrical member and cylindrical block and a conductor wire extending from the terminal end of the outermost storage battery and the innermost end of the conductor rod and a swivel connection between the inner end of the conductor rod and the outer end of the cylindrical block.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,238,492 8/1917 Byrne 273190 2,436,518 2/1948 Lieffers et al. 340-279 2,611,610 9/1952 Hara 273-183 2,692,924 10/1954 Williams et al. 200- 2,711,528 6/1955 Glossbrenner 340279 2,747,038 5/1956 P erkovich 340279 2,755,091 7/1956 Hara 273-183 2,999,232 9/1961 Wilson 340279 3,054,868 9/1962 Phillians 340-279 3,104,880 9/1963 Profera 273-- NEIL C. READ, Primary Examiner.

LOUIS J. CAPOZI, Examiner.

R. GOLDMAN, Assistant Exa nn'ner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1238492 *Mar 20, 1917Aug 28, 1917James W ByrneTraining-cap for golf-players.
US2436518 *Feb 12, 1945Feb 24, 1948Adams Richard THospital bed signal
US2611610 *May 16, 1950Sep 23, 1952Rikuo Hara JamesMechanical golf player's stance positioner
US2692924 *Jul 17, 1950Oct 26, 1954Williams CharlieWarning device for miners
US2711528 *Sep 10, 1954Jun 21, 1955Earl G GlossbrennerWaking alarm device for vehicle operators
US2747038 *Jul 27, 1953May 22, 1956Leo J PerkovichDriver's alarm
US2755091 *Oct 23, 1953Jul 17, 1956Hara James RGolf practice device
US2999232 *Jan 15, 1960Sep 5, 1961Wilson George JMouth opening alarm
US3054868 *Mar 30, 1959Sep 18, 1962Phillians EdwardSleep preventing alarm
US3104880 *May 25, 1961Sep 24, 1963 Golf swing training device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4193065 *Oct 20, 1978Mar 11, 1980Bittner Louis MGolf swing control alarm
US4743028 *Mar 26, 1985May 10, 1988Keith HarrisonGolf swing practice device
US4956923 *Nov 6, 1989Sep 18, 1990The Micromanipulator Co., Inc.Probe assembly including touchdown sensor
US5087047 *Mar 12, 1991Feb 11, 1992Mcconnell John PGolf training method and apparatus
US5665008 *Jun 7, 1996Sep 9, 1997Distance Doctor. Inc.Golf training apparatus
US7572192 *Jun 30, 2006Aug 11, 2009Boyd Richard LGolf swing training aid
US7815518 *Oct 14, 2008Oct 19, 2010Doyle Robert STraining apparatus for improving a golf swing
US8079917 *Oct 13, 2010Dec 20, 2011Doyle Robert STraining apparatus for improving an athletes swing
US9211466Apr 16, 2015Dec 15, 2015John D. BellPivotable boom golf swing improvement device
US20090105006 *Oct 14, 2008Apr 23, 2009Doyle Robert STraining Apparatus for improving a golf swing
WO1985004337A1 *Mar 26, 1985Oct 10, 1985Keith HarrisonGolf swing practice device
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/274, 434/252, 340/323.00R, 200/61.42, 200/52.00R
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3608
European ClassificationA63B69/36B