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Publication numberUS3245448 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 12, 1966
Filing dateOct 7, 1963
Priority dateOct 7, 1963
Publication numberUS 3245448 A, US 3245448A, US-A-3245448, US3245448 A, US3245448A
InventorsRea James B
Original AssigneeRea James B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag for carrying and storing skis
US 3245448 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 12, 1966 J. B. REA

BAG FOR CARRYING AND STORING sxxs Filed Oct. 7,

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United States Patent 3,245,448 BAG FOR CARRYING AND STORING SKIS James B. Rea, 3183 Silver Lake Blvd., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Filed Oct. 7, 1963, Ser. No. 314,372 4 Claims. (Cl. 150-52) This invention relates to a flexible bag for facilitating the transporting and storing of skis and ski poles.

A good pair of skis is relatively expensive, so that it is desirable to adequately protect them during storage and transportation. However, skis and ski poles are of such an awkward shape and size, and have cutting edges, so that it becomes difiicult to adequately protect them. It has been the usual practice to carry skis in a car top rack wherein each ski, or each pair of skis, is individually held. Such racks, however, normally leave the skis exposed to the weather, which is not desirable. Moreover, such car top racks do not adapt to the skis to storage, when skiing is out of season. Additionally, carrying the skis to and from the car from a place of storage or from the ski slopes means that the skis are not properly protected at this time. Patricularly is ski storage and transportation a problem for skiers who participate in races of various types wherein more than one set of skis and poles may be required for best performances.

It is the general object of the present invention to avoid and overcome the foregoing and other difficulties of and objections to prior art practices by the provision of an improved relatively inexpensive bag for carrying and storing more than one set of skis and poles.

Another object of the invention is to prti'vide a ski and pole bag which quickly receives the skis and poles, and which is readily removed therefrom.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a bag of the character described which protects, without shearing, the cutting edges of the skis.

Another object of the invention is to provide a ski and pole bag which can be utilized to protect the skis during storage, during carrying on a car, and during the carrying of the skis and poles to and from the car, the bag facilitating the carrying of the skis by the skier, and the bag folding up into a relatively small package or roll when removed from the skis and poles.

The foregoing objects of the invention, and other objects which will become apparent as the description proceeds, are achieved by a bag for transporting or storing skis and poles including a flexible substantially cylindrical body of fabric, a lining of Water-proofed fabric extending over at least the central portion of the body, compartment forming partition means of flexible fabric longitudinally secured along one edge inside the body to divide the bag longitudinally into separate compartments, fastener means operable from inside the body for releasably fastening the other edge of the partition means to the inside of the body, fastener means extending longitudinally of the body over a major portion of the body and releasably closing the body, and flexible strap means secured fore and aft of the center of gravity of the body for carrying the bag.

A better understanding of the invention will be had from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a bag incorporating the principles of the invention with portions broken away to show the interior construction;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken substantially on line 2-2 of FIGURE 1 but with the body and lining portions not being broken away;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged-cross sectional view taken substantially on line 3--3 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken substantially on line 44 of FIGURE 1;

3,245,448 Patented Apr. 12, 1966 "ice FIGURE 5 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken substantially on line 55 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 but of a modification of the invention.

In the drawings, the numeral 10 indicates generally a substantially cylindrical body of flexible plastic coated fabric, such as a vinyl resin coated cotton duck. Preferably the body 10 is made cigar-shaped curving flatly to a smaller diameter at both the front and rear of the bag, the rear being somewhat smaller in diameter than the front.

FIGURE 2 shows that the body 10 is preferably provided with a lining 12 of a water resistant or water-proofed fabric which is particularly shear resistant to the cutting edges of the skis. Rubberized nylon is preferably employed for the lining 12 which extends over at least the middle portion of the body 10, the front end of the lining 12 being indicated in FIGURE 1 at 14 with the back end of the lining 12 being at 16. It is advantageous, also, to employ the lining 12 at each end of the body 10, and FIGURE 4 shows a lining 18 secured on the inside of the plastic coated flexible fabric 20 forming the front end of the body 10. Stitching 22 secures the end 20 and lining 18 to the end of the body 10. The rear end of the body 10 is similarly closed. The lining 12 is unsecured to the body 10 over the major portion of the area of the lining, so that the lining 12 can move to and from the fabric of the body 10, and such unsecured portions have a limited lateral and longitudinal sliding relation thereto so that any cutting or shearing action on the body 10 or on the lining 12 by the cutting edges of the skis or some outside object in shear against the skis in the bag is minimized. This substantially eliminates the possibility of wear, tearing, or damage to the body 10 or the lining 12.

Extending substantially longitudinally of the top of the body 10 and over a major portion of the length of the body are fastening means 24 for facilitating the opening and closing of the body. Preferably the fastening means 24 are of the slide fastener type, and FIGURE 2 illustrates how the usual tape edges of the slide fastener 24 are secured by stitching 25 between the lining 12 and the body 10 over that area from the front end 14 of the lining 12 to a portion at a point substantially midway between end 16 and band 40, as described hereinbelow. The fastener 24 will only be stitched to the body 10 from the end 20 to the front end 14 of the lining 12.

FIGURE 2 also illustrates that inside of the lining 12 are provided partition forming means of flexible plastic coated fabric 26. These partition forming means extend, as indicated by dotted lines 27 and 29 in FIGURE 1, longitudinally of the body to divide it into substantially equal compartments. In FIGURE 2 the partition forming means 26 move from the full line position substantially in concentric engaging relation with the lining 12 to a dotted line position wherein each compartment is of pie-shape and in extent. Thus, three separate ski receiving compartments are provided. Only one pair of skis 28 and one pair of poles 30 have been illustrated.

One longitudinal edge of each partition means 26 is permanently secured longitudinally of the body 10, as be stitching 32. The other edge of each partition means 26 is releasably secured to the body 10 by fastener means 34, preferably a slide fastener, and of about the same length as fastener 24 as seen in the broken away portion of FIGURE 1. One fabric tape of the slide fastener is secured by stitching 36 to the lining 12 and body 10 and the other tape by stitching 38 to the edge of the partition means 26. Of course, the tapes of the fasteners 34 will only be stitched to the body 10 from the front 20 to the front end 14 of the lining 12.

It will be noted that the fasteners 34 are entirely inside of the body 10 which protects these fasteners from dirt and weather, enhances the appearance of the bag, and improves the strength of the bag because the body only opens at fastener means 24. It is possible to make the fastener means 34 of lighter and less expensive construction than the fastener means 24 for this reason. Suitable slides 55 and 35, respectively, are associated with the fastener means 24 and 34, in the usual manner.

It will be noted that the skis 28 and poles 30 have been shown in a particular position in the compartment, but it is not essential that they take this position, the compartment being of a size so that one set of skis and poles can be received in each compartment with a mini-mum of fuss and bother as to exact position.

Extending circumferentially around the body 10 are a pair of bands 40, one band being just to the rear or aft of the center of gravity of the bag when normally loaded, and the other band being forwardly, or to the fore of the center of gravity of the bag. Secured to and under the strengthening bands 40 are a pair of straps 42 positioned in parallel spaced apart relation, the straps 42 and bands 40 being secured as by stitching 44 to the body 10 and lining 12 as illustrated in FIGURE 3. The bands 40 and straps 42 are preferably made from flexible plastic coated fabric similar to the material forming the body 10, although a somewhat heavier or higher strength fabric may preferably be employed.

FIGURE illustrates that stitching 46 is utilized to secure the body to the end 14 of lining 12. A similar stitching is provided to secure the opposite end 16 of the lining 12 .to the body 10.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG- URE 6 is generally similar to that shown in FIGURE 2. Like parts in the two figures have been indicated by the same numerals, except that in FIGURE 6 the sufiix a has been added. The partition means 26a in FIGURE 6 is secured by stitching 32a along one longitudinal edge to the body 10:: and lining 12a over the lining length. Again the tapes of the fastener 24a (mentioned below) are secured only to the body 10a from the front 20 to the front end of the lining 12a. The stitching 32a extends longitudinally of the body 10a at a distance approximately from the slide fastener 24a which opens and closes the body 10a. The other longitudinal edge of the partition means 26a is releasably secured, preferably by a slide fastener 34a which has one tape fastened by stitching 36a to the body 10a and lining 12a, over the length of the lining 12a, then only to the body 10a from the front 20 to the front of the lining 12a, and the other tape being secured by stitching 38a to the edge of the partition means 26a.

The partition means 26a normally lies substantially concentric to and in engagement with the liner 12a in the position shown in solid lines, but wit-h the partition irneans moving to the dotted line position shown to divide the inside of the body 10a into two substantially equal compartments each of which extends fully longitudinally of the body, each compartment in cross section having a pie-shape 180 in extent. Each compartment of the invention shown in FIGURE 6 will receive and store one pair of skis and poles. In this embodiment of the invention the overall diameter of the bag can be somewhat reduced over the diameter of the bag shown in FIGURE 2.

It is possible, of course, to carry but a single pair or a double pair of skis in one or both of the forms of the invention illustrated, with the remainder of the bag receiving additional articles of ski apparel, clothing, or other such articles. Some such articles can be carried even when the full complement of skis are in each bag. The double strap arrangement of the bag uniformly distributes the weight carried in the bag to the carrying straps, these straps being of a length to conveniently slide over the shoulder of the person carrying the bag with the bag resting high on the hip, and so that the person carrying the bag can use his hand extending downwardly from the shoulder receiving the straps to help steady the bag and make the carrying thereof easier.

The bag of the invention is adapted to store skis, poles, and the like ski materials When out of season. In season the bag can be picked up and placed in a car or strapped to a car top rack for transportation to the parking lot near a slope. The bag can then be carried to a dressing room or to the slope and the skis for the first time removed from the bag ready for use, with the bag then being folded or rolled into a compartment body for storing in a locker or in the car until reused.

While certain representative embodiments and details have been shown for the purpose of illustrating the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in this art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A bag for transporting or storing skis and poles including a flexible cigar-shaped body of plastic coated fabric having blunt circularly shaped ends, a lining of rubberized nylon extending over at least the central por tion of the body, the major portion of the lining being free for movement to and from the body, separate linings of rubberized nylon sewn in place to the body on the circular shaped ends thereof, compartment forming partition means of flexible plastic coated fabric longitudinally secured to the sides of the body along the longitudinal centerline of the partition means to divide the bag longitudinally into three separate compartments, slide fastener means operable from inside the body for releasably fastening the other edges of the partition means to the inside of the body at substantially equally spaced relation to the secured longitudinal centerline of the partition means and to each other, slide fastener means extending longitudinally of the body over a major portion of the body and releasably closing the body, a pair of strengthening bands of flexible plastic coated fabric surrounding the body to the front of and the back of the center of gravity of the body when loaded in each compartment with skis, and a pair of flexible straps of plastic coated fabric extending in parallel spaced apart relation between the bands for carrying the bag.

2. A bag for transporting or storing skis and poles including a flexible cigar-shaped body of plastic coated fabric, a lining of rubberized nylon open at each end extending over at least the central portion and the ends of the body, the lining being secured to the body along the central portion thereof on a narrow longitudinally extending area with the major portion of the lining being free for movement laterally, to and from the body, cornpalrtment forming partition means of flexible plastic coated fabric longitudinally secured along one edge inside the body to divide the bag longitudinally into separate compartments, slide fastener means operable from inside the body for releasably fastening the other edge of the partition means to the inside ofthe body, slide fastener means extending longitudinally of the body along a portion of the area where the lining is secured to the body and along an end portion of the body for releasably closing the body, a pair of strengthening bands of flexible plastic coated fabric surrounding the body in axially spaced relation to the center of gravity of the body when loaded, said bands being on opposite sides of the center of gravity, and a pair of flexible straps extending in parallel spaced apart relation between the bands for carrying the bag.

3. A bag for carrying and storing skis including a flexible substantially cylindrical body having substantially circular closed ends, fastener means extending substantially longitudinally of the body for opening and closing the body, a pair of flexible partition means dividing the interior of the body into three longitudinally extending compartments each of generally pie-segment shape and about in extent, said partition means being movable from the pie-segment-shaped position to a position substantially in engagement with the inside of the body, fastener means operable from the interior of the body for releasably securing one edge of each partition means to the body, means permanently securing the other edge of each partition means to the body, and water repellant means lining the central portion of the body for reducing shear between the body and the cutting edges of the skis carried in any compartment.

4. A bag for carrying and storing skis including a flexible substantially cylindrical body having a substantially 10 ciroular closed ends, fastener means extending substantially longitudinally of the body for opening and closing the body, a flexible partition means dividing the interior of the body into two longitudinally extending compartments each of substantially semi-circular shape and about 180 in extent, said partition means being movable from a position dividing the body into two semi-circular shape-d compartments to a position substantially in engagement with the inside of the body, fastener means operable from the interior of the body for releasably securing one edge of said partition means to the body, means permanently securing the other edge of said partition means to the 6 body, and water repellant means lining the central portion of the body for reducing shear between the body and the cutting edges of the skis carried in any compartment.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,430,597 10/1922 Singer 190-51' 1,859,970 5/1932 Kaufmann 190-41 1,997,637 4/ 1935 Gebelein 190-41 2,035,427 3/ 1936 Goldstein 190-41 2,180,686 11/1939 Lorinvioh ISO-52X 2,250,388 7/ 1941 Mickelberg 150-52 X 2,533,850 12/1950 Syracuse 150-52 X 2,634,836 4/1953 Warren 190-41 15 2,767,758 10/1956 Haynes 15o s2 FOREIGN PATENTS 564 1910 Great Britain. 83,251 3/1954 Norway.

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1430597 *Nov 18, 1921Oct 3, 1922Singer Bros & CompanyTraveler's hand bag or satchel
US1859970 *Nov 8, 1927May 24, 1932Kaufmann & Co Inc KTraveling bag
US1997637 *Jan 17, 1933Apr 16, 1935Eureka Mfg Company IncShoe bag
US2035427 *Nov 2, 1932Mar 24, 1936Samuel R GoldsteinCarpet cover and the like
US2180686 *Apr 28, 1939Nov 21, 1939Lorinovich AlecSki protector
US2250388 *Mar 7, 1940Jul 22, 1941Mickelberg Orville CSki case
US2533850 *Sep 13, 1947Dec 12, 1950Syracuse Frances PUtility handbag having double compartment with individual closures and independently accessible bottle pockets
US2634836 *Jul 24, 1951Apr 14, 1953Harry WarrenUtility case
US2767758 *Feb 2, 1954Oct 23, 1956Abercrombie & Fitch CompanyTennis bag
GB191000564A * Title not available
NO83251A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3851689 *Sep 13, 1973Dec 3, 1974Kohls RFoldable ski cover
US3948302 *Sep 25, 1974Apr 6, 1976Kohls Richard SFoldable ski cover
US4191233 *Nov 9, 1978Mar 4, 1980Mckay GordonSki covers
US4196762 *Aug 16, 1978Apr 8, 1980Goodwin Jerry LSki bag
US4715416 *Mar 3, 1987Dec 29, 1987Connelly Skis, Inc.Ski cover
US4815509 *Dec 17, 1987Mar 28, 1989Owen David TSki bag with pleat for protecting ski edges
US5427453 *May 28, 1993Jun 27, 1995Cloessner; Jacob E.Dual opening carrying bag
US6311883Aug 16, 1999Nov 6, 2001Miriam A. GreenbergSki case
US6561355 *Jan 26, 2000May 13, 2003Hunter's Specialties, Inc.Garment bag having odor and scent-controlling capabilities
US7424950 *Jan 30, 2004Sep 16, 2008Trg Accessories, L.L.C.Golf bag carrier with protective golf club head enclosure
US20050167303 *Jan 30, 2004Aug 4, 2005Burgess Andrew A.Golf bag carrier with protective golf club head enclosure
US20100038198 *Aug 18, 2008Feb 18, 2010Jason JarvisConfigurable Utility Transport Carrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/315.1, 383/66, 383/6, 383/97, 383/38
International ClassificationA63C11/02, A63C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C11/027
European ClassificationA63C11/02C