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Publication numberUS3245905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 12, 1966
Filing dateOct 9, 1962
Priority dateOct 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3245905 A, US 3245905A, US-A-3245905, US3245905 A, US3245905A
InventorsDonaldson Raymond E, White Charles C
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blended fibers having improved antistatic properties
US 3245905 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,245,905 BLENDED FIBERS HAVING IMPROVED ANTISTATIC PROPERTIES Charles C. White and Raymond E. Donaldson, Kingsport,

Tenn., assignors to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of NewJersey No Drawing. Filed Oct. 9, 1962, Ser. No. 229,486

5 Claims. (Cl. 252--8.75)

This invention relates to novel compositions of matter for use in the textile art. More particularly, this invention relates to novel antistatic and lubricating compositions for treating textile fibers and to fibers treated therewith.

Lubricants and like compounds are usually applied to textile fibers, filaments, yarns and the like to reduce the tendency toward breakage of the individual filaments when they are subjected to various mechanical strains, and tolubricate the individual filaments in order to facilitate handling in such operations as spinning, twisting, winding, reeling, drafting, weaving, carding, combing, and the like.

Textile fibers also tend to accumulate electrostatic charges during the various handling operations such as spinning, twisting, winding, and the like. The accumulation of electrostatic charges causes the fibers to become electrically repellent to one another and to become electrically attracted to the equipment on which they are handled.- As is known in the art, such a condition is highly undesirable in that it interferes substantially with the efiiciency and effectiveness of processing operations. It is therefore desirable that the applied composition reduce substantially or completely eliminate the tendency of the treated textile fibers to accumulate undesirable electrostatic charges during processing.

The new synthetic resin fibers such as those prepared from polyester resins, polyamide resins, polyolefin resins, and resins prepared by the polymerization and copolymerization of certain acrylic compounds have proved highly satisfactory for use in the textile industry. These fibers, which normally have hydrophobic properties, are used in the manufacture of fabrics and like materials. Often, these hydrophobic fibers are blended or associated with hydrophilic fibers such as cotton, wool, viscose and the like to provide fabrics having certain desired properties.

Various lubricating and antistatic compositions have been proposed for treatment of the above-mentioned hydrophobic synthetic resin fibers. However, these compositions have not proved entirely satisfactory in use.

One particular problem involved in the use of known treating compositions is that, when hydrophobic fibers treated therewith are blended with hydrophilic fibers, the applied composition tends to migrate to the hydrophilic fibers leaving the hydrophobic fibers substantially devoid of antistatic protection and satisfactory frictional characteristics.

This invention has for one of its objects novel antistatic and lubricating compositions for application to hydrophobic fibers.

Another object of this invention is a textile fiber treated with the novel antistatic and lubricating compositions of this invention.

Other objects of this invention will, in part, be obvious and will, in part, appear hereinafter.

For a complete understanding of the nature and the objects of this invention, reference is made to the following detailed description.

Briefly, in accordance with this invention, there are provided novel antistatic and lubricating compositions adapted particularly to be applied to textile fibers having hydrophobic properties such as textilefibers prepared States Patent Patented Apr. i2, @066 with polyamide resins, polyester resins, polyolefin resins, acrylic resins, and the like whereby there is provided treated textile fibers having outstanding antistatic properties and frictional properties.

The base antistatic and lubricating composition of this invention is comprised of, by weight, (A) from about 20' groups in a weight ratio of 1,2-propylene oxide to ethylene oxide of from 60:40 to 40:60, the monoethers of said mixture containing in a single molecule both the oxyethylene group and the oxy 1,2-propylene group, (B) from about 5' parts to 35 parts of lauryl acid phosphate, (C) from about 1 part to 10 parts of morpholine, (D) from about 5 parts to 25 parts of polyoxyethylene glycol having a molecular weight of from about 1,000 to 2,000, and (E) from about 1 part to 5 parts of o-phenylphenol.

While the above composition has proved highly satisfactory in use, other components can be incorporated therein, if desired, to improve to some degree the antistatic and/ or lubricating properties thereof.

Thus, while the antistatic properties of the above basecomposition are highly satisfactory for most applications, the antistatic properties can be improved somewhat by the incorporation therein of from about 5% to 30% by weight, based on the total weight of the base composition, of polyoxyethylene lauryl amine wherein the polyoxyethylene group has an average molecular weight of about 200. This compound can be prepared by reacting lauryl amine with ethylene oxide, the ethylene oxide being employed in an amount sufficient to provide a polyethylene lauryl amine wherein the polyoxyethylene group has an average molecular weight of about 200. Such a compound is available commercially as Atlas G 3780A.

Also, the antistatic properties can be improved by the addition to the base composition of the N,N-diethylaminoethanol salt of oleyl sulfate. The amountemployed will be from about 5% to 25% by weight, based on the total weight of the base composition. This compound has the structural formula (I) CzHs ctiH,,os -onn ontomon C2115 Component (A) of the base composition is a mixture having relatively high molecular weight and which comprises molecules formed predominantly of the OC H and the oxy l,2,-propylene group,

Such mixture can result, for instance, from the reaction of a monohydroxy aliphatic alcohol such, for example, i as butanol with alkylene oxide mixtures containing, for

the most part, ethylene oxide and 1,2-propylene oxide. A mixture of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers can be prepared by adding a substantially aldehyde-free mixture of ethylene oxide and 1,2-propylene oxide to an aliphatic monohydroxy alco containing polyoxyalkylene chains oxyethylene group The preferred mixture of oxides is about equal parts, by weight, of the oxides. That is, in the oxide mixture, there is present for each one part by weight of ethylene oxide, one part by weight of 1,2-propylene oxide.

The mixture of oxides is added at such rate as to maintain a substantially uniform concentration of unreacted oxide in the reaction zone while maintaining the reaction mixture at a temperature of from about 80 C. to 160 C. and at a pressure of from about p.s.i. to 50 p.s.1.

Mixtures of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers and their method of preparation are disclosed and described in Patent 2,425,755 of August 19, 1947, reference to which is hereby made. Mixtures of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers are available commercially under the proprietary designation Ucon. As set forth hereinabove the preferred mixture of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers are those which have a viscosity of from about 200 to 700 SUS (Saybolt Universal Seconds) at 100 F.

Example I Particularly suitable as component (A) is a mixture of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene butyl monoethers having a viscosity of about 300 SUS at 100 F. and in which ethylene oxide and 1,2-propylene oxide are combined therein as oxyethylene and oxy 1,2- propylene groups in a ratio which is about one part of 1,2-propylene oxide for each part of ethylene oxide, by weight, the monoethers of said mixture containing in a single molecule both the oxyethylene group and the oxy 1,2-propylene group. This mixture is prepared as hereinbefore described using butanol as the aliphatic monohydroxy alcohol. Such a mixture is available commercially under the proprietary designation Ucon 50 HB 260.

The lauryl acid phosphate component (B) can be either dilauryl phosphate (C H HPO monolauryl phosphate (C H )H PO or mixtures thereof.

The polyoxyethylene glycol component (D), also referred to in the art as polyethylene glycol, employed in preparing the base composition of this invention can be polyoxyethylene glycol having an average molecular weight of from about 1,000 to 2,000. These compounds are well known in the art and are available commercially. Thus, for example, a polyoxyethylene glycol having an average molecular weight of about 1540 is is available commercially under the proprietary designation Carbowax 1540.

In preparing the novel lubricating and antistatic compositions of this invention, the components in the desired amounts are admixed or blended together in any conventional manner such, for example, as by blending in a high-speed blender or by stirring with a motor-driven stirrer.

The base compositions of this invention are either completely soluble or completely dispersible in water depending on the water solubility of the individual components of which the formulation is comprised. Thus,

the application of the novel composition of this invention to textile fibers is conveniently and preferably accomplished by employing water as a vehicle or carrier therefor. The aqueous solution or dispersion can be applied to textile fibers in any conventional manner such, for example, as by immersion, by wick application, by roll application, or by spraying.

The aqueous solutions or suspensions of the compositions of this invention will usually comprise from about 5 parts to 25 parts by weight of the composition and from about 95 to 75 parts by weight of water. Distilled water is preferred. The above proportions are not critical and can be departed from if desired. The proportions set forth above have proved highly satisfactory in use.

In applying an aqueous solution or suspension of the novel composition of this invention to hydrophobic textile fibers, it has been determined, by long CXPEil'lBDCt that the amount of antistatic and lubricating compositio carried by a fiber, filament, or yarn lies within a rel: tively, narrow optimum range. Below the range, insuffi cient lubrication and antistatic properties are obtainec' While above the range certain properties such as tensil strength and processa-bility are affected adversely. Th amount of antistatic and lubricating composition carriel by the fibers can be within the range of from about 0. percent to 3 percent by weight based on the weight 0 the fibers. It is preferred, however, that the appliei antistatic and lubricating composition be within the rela tively narrow rangeof from about 0.1 percent to l per cent by weight based on the weight of the fibers.

The following examples are illustrative of this inven tion. All parts are by weight unless otherwise indicated Example II Part:

The monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene butyl monoether mixture of Example I 5( An approximately equal molar mixture of monolauryl phosphate and dilauryl phosphate 25 Morpholine 'i Polyoxyethylene glycol having an average molecular Weight of about 1540 (Carbowax 1540) 15 o-Phenylphenol 3 The treated fibers can be dried in air or they can be placed in an oven maintained at a temperature of from about C. to C. for about an hour to remove from the applied coating substantially all water. In this specific example the fibers are dried in a heated oven. The amount of applied composition is equal to about 0.25 percent by weight based on the weight of the fibers. The treated tow is satisfactorily processed on a Pacific converter into top. The resulting top is of excellent quality and is substantially free of defects such as clusters and unopened fibers.

Example III Example IV The following composition, in an aqueous medium, is applied by immersion to polyester staple fibers similar to those described in Example II. The amount of applied composition is about 0.25% by weight based on the total weight of the fibers.

- Parts The monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene butyl monoether mixture of Example I 34 An approximately equal molar mixture of monolauryl phosphate and dilauryl phosphate 17.5 Morpholine 5 Polyoxyethylene glycol having an average molecular weight of about 1540 10.5 Polyoxyethylene 200 lauryl amine 30 o-Phenylphenol 3 The treated polyester fibers are blended in a 50 percent-50' percent weight ratio with viscose fibers and aged for a week. The test results at the end of this period show excellent antistatic properties of the blend thereby indicating substantially no migration of the applied composition to the hydrophilic viscose fibers. Unblended polyester fibers also show excellent antistatic properties.

Example V Polyester fibers similar to those described in Example II are treated with the following composition in an aqueous medium.

Parts The monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene butyl monoether mixture of Example I 40 An approximately equal molar mixture of monolauryl phosphate and dilauryl phosphate 20 Morpholine 5.6 Polyoxyethylene glycol having an average molecular weight of about 1540 12.0 N,N-diethylaminoethanol salt of oleyl sulfate 20 o-Phenylphenol 2.4

The amount of the above composition that is applied to the fibers is about 0.25 percent by weight based on the weight of the fibers. The applied lubricant gives excellent control of static and also provides highly satisfactory frictional characteristics for the treated polyester fibers.

Satisfactory results are obtained when either staple fibers or continuous filament fibers are treated with the composition of this invention.

The novel antistatic and lubricating compositions of this invention are adapted particularly for the treatment of synthetic resinous fibers prepared from polyester resins such as polyethylene terephthalate and the polyester resins disclosed in the above examples; polyamide resins such as polycaprolactam (nylon-6), polyhexamethylene adipamide (nylon-66), and polyhexamethylene sebacamide (nylon-68); polyolefins such, for example, as polyethylene, polypropylene and poly-l-butene; and polyacrylates.

Other textile fibers, filaments, yarns and the like that can be treated with the antistatic and lubricating composition of this invention include those prepared from the organic acid esters of cellulose such, for example, as cellulose acetate, cellulose triacetate, cellulose acetate butyrate, and cellulose acetate propiona te.

Fibers, filaments, yarns and the like treated with the novel antistatic and lubricating composition of this invention are provided with substantial antistatic protection for prolonged periods of time. A buildup of electrostatic charges on the treated fibers is substantially eliminated.

One of the primary advantages of the novel composition of this invention is that it does not migrate to hydrophilic fibers when hydrophobic fibers, treated with the composition, are blended with or associated with hydrophilic fibers during textile processing steps, thereby providing substantially continued control of static and frictional properties during subsequent textile processing operations.

The compositions of this invention provide for highly satisfactory fiber-to-fiber and fiber-to-metal frictional properties of the treated fibers during processing and the like. They do not corrode textile equipment and have no toxic effects. Furthermore, the novel lubricating and antistatic compositions of this invention when applied to hydrophobic fibers of the type described hereinabove provide treated fibers that have excellent tow opening properties. In addition, the fibers treated with the composition of this invention do not become sticky or gummy on aging and they show excellent heat and light stability.

It is to be understood that the above description and examples are illustrative of this invention and not in limitation thereof.

. 0 We claim: 1. Blended fibers having improved antistatic properties, said blend being essentially composed of hydrophilic fibers and polyester staple fibers carrying on said polyester fibers a textile lubricant, said blended fibers being characterized in that after aging for one week the antistatic properties remain substantially unafiected, said lubricantbeing essentially composed of, by weight,

(A) from about 20 parts to 75 parts of a water soluble compound which is a mixture of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers having a viscosity of from about 200 to 700 Saybolt Universal Seconds at F. and in which ethylene oxide and 1,2-propylene oxide are combined therein as oxyethylene and oxy 1,2-propylene groups in a weight ratio of 1,2-propylene oxide to ethylene oxide of from 60:40 to 40:60, the monoethers of said mixture containing in a single molecule both the oxyethylene group and the oxy 1,2-p1'opylene group, (B) from about 5 parts to 35 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of monolauryl phosphate, dilauryl phosphate, and mixtures thereof, (C) from about 1 part to 10 parts of morpholine, (D) from about 5 parts to 25 parts of polyoxyethylene glycol having a molecular weight of from about 1,000 to 2,000, and (E) from about l-part to 5 parts of o-phenylphenol.

2. Blended fibers having improved antistatic properties, said blend being essentially composed of hydrophilic fibers and polyester staple fibers carrying on said polyester fibers a textile lubricant, said blended fibers being characterized in that after aging for one week the antistatic properties remain substantially unaliected, said lubricant being essentially composed of, by weight,

(A) from about 20 parts to 75 parts of a water soluble compound which is a mixture of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers hav ing a viscosity of from about 200 to 700 Saybolt Universal Seconds at 100 F. and in which ethylene oxide and 1,2-propylene oxide are combined therein as oxyethylene and oxy 1,2-propylene groups in a weight ratio of 1,2-propylene oxide to ethylene oxide of from 60:40 to 40:60, the monoethers of said mixture containing in a single molecule both the oxyethylene group and the oxy 1,2-propylene group, (B) from about 5 parts to 35 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of monolauryl phosphate, dilauryl phosphate, and mixtures thereof,'

(C) from about 1 part to 10 parts of morpholine,

(D) from about 5 parts to 25 parts of polyoxyethylene.

glycol having a molecular weight of from about 1,000 to 2,000,

(E) from about 1 part to 5 parts of o-phenylphenol," I

30% by weight based on the total weight of (A),

3. Blended fibers as defined by claim 2 wherein said hydrophilic fibers are viscose fibers and said polyester is poly (1,4-cyclohexylenedimethylene terephthalate).

4. Blended fibers having improved antistatic properties, said blend being essentially composed of hydrophilic fibers and polyester staple fibers carrying on said polyester fibers a textile lubricant, said blended fibers being characterized in that after aging for one week the antistatic properties remain substantially unalfected, said lubricant being essentially composed of, by weight,

(A) from about 20 parts to 75 parts of a water soluble compound which is a mixture of monohydroxy oxyethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers having a viscosity of from about 200 to 700 Saybolt Universal Seconds at 100 F. and in which ethylenev oxide and 1,2propylene oxide are combined therein weight ratio of 1,2-propylene oxide to ethylene oxide of from 60:40 to 40:60, the monoethers of said mixture containing in. a single molecule both the oxyethylene group and the oxy 1,2-propylene group, (B) from about 5 parts to 35 partsof a compound selected from the group consisting of monolauryl phosphate, dilauryl phosphate, and mixtures thereof,

oxyethylene group and the oxy 1,2-propylene group, 5 (C) from about 1 part to 10 parts of morpholine, (B) from about 5 parts to 35 parts of a compound (-D) from about 5 parts to 25 parts of polyoxyethylene selected from the group consisting of monolauryl glycol having a molecular weight of from about (cghrzsphatelg dilaillryl phospllgate, and fmixture: lthereof, (,El),0? to 2,800; 1 t t 5 t f h I h 1 rom 21 out part to parts 0 morp 0 me, rom a on par 0 par s o o-p eny p eno (D) from about 5 parts to 25 parts of polyoxyethylene (F) polyoxyethylene lauryl amine wherein the polyoxyglyzcglolaaving a molecular weight of from about 1,000 etjhyleraeogroup has an fveragletmgileculalg weiggt 25f to a on 111 an amoun equa 0 rom a on o o (E) from about 1 part to 5 parts of o-phenylphenol, 30% lg) weight based on the total weight of (A),

and and an (F) from about 5% to 25% by weight based on the (G) from about 5% to 25% by weight based on the total weight of (A), (B), (C), (D), and (E) of total weight of (A), (B), (C), (D), and (E) of N,N-diethylaminoethanol salt of oleyl sulfate. N,N-diethylaminoethanol salt of oleyl sulfate. 5. Blended fibers having improved antistatic properties, said blend being essentially composed of hydrophilic fibers References Cited y t Examlllel' and polyester staple fibers carrying on said polyester fibers UNITED STATES PATENTS gfi i i f i fg l j 2,278,747 4/1942 Swezey etal 252---8.75 m a f fi ff, .3 f; a E P 2,425,755 8/1947 Roberts et a1. 252--8.9 XR er i S ,3 f 6 u mg 2,597,947 5/1952 Oxley et a1. 252-8.75 5x 13 fi ifi 28 arxs ti 'fi arts of a water soluble 2614984 10/1952 Thomas et 252 8'75 com oun ti which a mixture? of mon oh drox ox 2690426 9/1954 Jefferson et 252 8'9 XR P Y Y Y 2,743,193 4/1956 Donaldson et al. 2528.8 XR ethylene oxy 1,2-propylene aliphatic monoethers hav- 2 803 565 8/1957 S ager 252--8.9XR mg a viscosity of from about 200 to 700 Saybolt U a 2,865,855 12/1958 Chandler 25%-8.9

niversal Seconds at 100 F. and in which ethylene 1 oxide and 1 2- r0 lene oxide are combined therein 2901466 8/1959 Klbler et a1 260 75 P PY 3,042,544 7/ 1962 Marzocchi et a1. 252-89 XR as oxyethylene and oxy 1,2-propylene groups in a weight ratio of 1,2-propylene oxide to ethylene oxide of'from 60:40 to 40:60, the monoethers of said mixture containing in a single molecule both the JULIUS GREENWALD, Primary Examiner. I. T. FEDIGAN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2278747 *May 23, 1940Apr 7, 1942Du PontChemical composition
US2425755 *Jun 1, 1944Aug 19, 1947Carbide & Carbon Chem CorpMixtures of polyoxyalkylene monohydroxy compounds and methods of making such mixtures
US2597947 *Jan 15, 1947May 27, 1952Celanese CorpTextile treating compositions
US2614984 *Mar 5, 1949Oct 21, 1952Celanese CorpTextile dressing materials
US2690426 *Mar 7, 1950Sep 28, 1954Atlas Powder CoLubricating compositions
US2743193 *Aug 10, 1953Apr 24, 1956Eastman Kodak CoTreated cellulose organic acid ester fibers
US2803565 *Sep 8, 1955Aug 20, 1957Ici LtdProcessing of fibres
US2865855 *Aug 8, 1952Dec 23, 1958Du PontTextile treating composition
US2901466 *Dec 22, 1955Aug 25, 1959Eastman Kodak CoLinear polyesters and polyester-amides from 1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol
US3042544 *Dec 17, 1954Jul 3, 1962Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpYarns of staple glass fibers and compositions and methods for manufacturing same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3399079 *Sep 25, 1964Aug 27, 1968American Cyanamid CoAntistatic fiber blend
US3403042 *Apr 23, 1965Sep 24, 1968Ici LtdProcess of coating electrically nonconducting films with an organic heat-sealable polymer coating containing an ethanolamine salt and the coated film
US3656996 *Apr 10, 1970Apr 18, 1972Agfa Gevaert NvAntistatic polyester film
US4816336 *Apr 2, 1987Mar 28, 1989Hoechst Celanese CorporationSynthetic fiber having high neutralized alkyl phosphate ester finish level
US6802994Nov 28, 2000Oct 12, 2004Astaris LlcAzoles; sunlight and acid resistance; fugitive color system; suppression of wildland fires by aerial application; suspension
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/361, 252/8.84
International ClassificationD06M13/288, D06M13/463, D06M13/00, D06M13/262, D06M15/37, D06M13/152, D06M15/53
Cooperative ClassificationD06M13/288, D06M13/262, D06M13/463, D06M13/152, D06M15/53
European ClassificationD06M13/152, D06M13/463, D06M13/288, D06M13/262, D06M15/53