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Publication numberUS3247316 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1966
Filing dateApr 22, 1964
Priority dateApr 22, 1964
Also published asDE1465159A1, DE1465159B2
Publication numberUS 3247316 A, US 3247316A, US-A-3247316, US3247316 A, US3247316A
InventorsWeimer Jr Edgar Arthur
Original AssigneeAmp Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector for terminating aluminum foil
US 3247316 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 19, 1966 E. A. WEIMER, JR 3,247,316

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FOR TERMINATING ALUMINUM FOIL Filed April 22, 1964 fwa 1N VENTOR. EDGHR ARTHUR \JEmgzJm.

United States Patent O M 3,247,316 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FOR TERMINATING ALUMINUM FOIL Edgar Arthur Weimer, .lr., Harrisburg, Pa., assignor to AMP Incorporated, Harrisburg, Pa. Filed Apr. 22, 196 Ser. No. 361,853 5 Claims. (Cl. 1'74-94) This application constitutes a continuation-in-part of my previous applications, Serial No. 857,158, filed December 3, 1959, now abandoned, and Serial No. 141,166, filed September 27, 1961, now Patent No. 3,138,658.

The extensive use of conductive foil or very thin sheet metal members (e.g., aluminum) as an electrical condu c'tor for electronic and miniature components is complicated by the fact that it is difiicult to join the foil to other electrical conductors. Because of the fragile nature of the foil, securing the foil to a wire or component tends to either tear the foil or to make an imperfect connection. It is an object of this invention to provide an electrical connector capable of being secured to conductive foil, or the like, which provides an electrical connection, is easily applied and has high tensile strength and excellent properties of electrical conductivity.

It is also an object of this invention to provide an electrical connecting device adapted to be secured to aluminum foil by wrapping it around the foil and pressing it into the foil.

It is also an object of this invention to provide an electrical connecting device adapted to be secured to aluminum foil by wrapping or folding it over the foil and clamping it thereto so that tangs on one area of the device pierce the foil.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a terminating means for sheet metal or metal foil, such as, for example, copper, aluminum, alloys thereof, or the like, which comprises a terminal having on one side lance means having a plurality of points and on the other side in opposition to the lance means, a one-point tab or lance member.

Other objects and attainments of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a reading of the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the drawings in which there is shown and described an illustrative embodiment of the invention; it is to be understood, however, that this embodiment is not intended to be exhaustive nor limiting of the invention but is given for purposes of illustration in order that others skilled in the art may fully understand the invention and the principles thereof and the manner of applying it in practical use so that they may modify it in various forms, each as may be best suited to the conditions of a particular use.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view similar to FIGURE 12 showing the connector applied to a sheet of metal; and

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken along lines 1414 of FIGURE 2.

Turning now to FIGURES 1-3, there is shown an embodiment of the present invention. In this embodiment, connector 400 comprises two opposed legs or plates 401 and 402 connected together at one end. Each leg includes rows of perforations 403. Every other perforation in each row has a plurality of sharp lances or tangs 404 for-med therearound which are substantially of V-shaped configuration and extend outwardly from the leg in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of the perforation. Each of the remaining perforations in each row has a single sharp lance or tang 405 of 3,247,316 Patented Apr. 19, 1966 ICC similar configuration as those of lances 404 extending outwardly from the leg in a direction substantially parallel to the axis of the perforation.

As can be discerned from FIGURE 1, the lances on one leg extend toward the lances on the other leg and the perforations containing lances 404 are oppositely disposed with respect to the perforations containing lances 405. While it is desirable that the apertures in each leg be oppositely disposed, in some cases they will be slightly out of alignment; but, upon application to a conductive member, they will come into alignment. When forming lances 405, it is desirable, where applicable, that they be diagonal with respect to the opposing perforations containing lances 404. While only two rows of lanced perforations have been shown in each leg of the connector, it is obvious that one or more rows may be provided in each leg, a single perforation of either kind in one leg may be diametrically disposed with respect to the other kind of perforation in the other leg, or the perforations in each leg may be staggered with respect to each other so long as the perforations containing lances 404 in one leg are opposite the other perforations containing lances 405 in the other leg. Other arrangements can obviously be visualized; however, description thereof would be superfluous.

As shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, one end of legs 401 and 402 are connected together While the other ends are free. A ferrule member 406 extends outwardly from the connected ends and is afiixed to the wire section of an electrical conductor means 407 as, for example, by crimping, welding, soldering, etc. Of course, an electrical conductor means may be secured to the connector in the manner shown in FIGURES 8 or 9 in the aforementioned patent or in any other suitable manner. Additionally, connector 400 may take the forms illustrated in FIGURES 2, 4, 8 and 9 in the aforementioned patent.

The connector may be made from any desirable material, such as, copper, brass, steel, bronze, etc., and the type of metal or alloy thereof will depend primarily on its use and the purposes of conductivity. Plating the connect-or may also be desirable. This embodiment may be aflixed to a conductive member 408 which not only may be metallic foil but also sheet metal up to any workable thickness, and the size and hardness of the connector will be proportional to that of the material to which it is to be attached. It should be pointed out that the foil or sheet metal may be coated with insulating material which need not be removed upon the connector being applied to the conductive member. This is also true with respect to the other embodiments.

In assembly, conductive member 408 is placed between legs 401 and 402, pressure is applied to the outer surface of each leg as, for example, by means of opposing anvils, whereupon the perforations containing lances 404 provide a punch relief area so that opposing lances 405 easily punch through the conductive member. Upon the legs being pressed into tight engagement with the conductive member, lances 405 engage one of the anvils and become flattened in rivet-like manner, while lances 404 pierce, scrape and become embedded into or impaled upon the conductive member because the inner surface of the leg adjacent lances 405 acts as an anvil to cause these lances to bend back toward their respective leg. FIGURE 3 illustrates the foregoing which shows the disposition of lances 404 and 405 and thereby provides a riveted and, therefore, interlocked connection or termination.

With respect to the embodiment of FIGURES 1-3, the aggregate number of lances provides a strong connection between the connector and conductive member. During the terminating process, the lances pierce and foregoing description and accompanying drawings is offered by way of illustration only. The actual scope of the invention is intended to be defined in the following claims when viewed in their proper perspective against 'the prior art.

What' is claimed is:

1. An electrical connection comprising leg members having opposed surfaces, each leg member having at least one aperture, the apertures in each leg being in op position, each aperture having lance means thereat and extending toward each other, said leg members being pressed into engagement with a sheet of conductive material with the lance means of one aperture piercing said sheet and extending through the other aperture, the lance means of the other aperture scraping and piercing the sheet and being bent back toward the respective leg member thereof upon engagement with the inner surface of .theopposingleg member, the end of thelance means extending through the other aperture being blunted to rivet the leg members in mechanical and electrical engagement with said sheet of conductive material.

An electrical connection between a connector and a sheet of conductive means comprising leg means having opposing surfaces, each of said surfaces having a plurality of aperturees, the apertures in one surfacebeing disposed substantially opposite to the apertures in the other surface, lance means located adjacent each aperture and extending toward each other, said leg means being pressed into engagement with said sheet of conductive means with some of the lance means of each of said leg means piercing said sheetof conductive means and extending through the apertures in opposition thereto while the lance means of these opposition apertures scrape and pierce the sheet of conductive means, and arebent back toward the respective leg means thereof upon engagement with the inner surface of the opposing leg means, the ends of the A lance means extending through the opposition apertures being blunted to rivet the leg means invmechanical and ele'crical engagement with said sheet, of conductive means.

3. As an article of manufacture, an electrical connector for making electrical connection with a sheet of conductive means comprising plate means each provided with at least one aperture, the aperture in one plate means being oppositely disposed with respect tothe aperture in the other plate means, lance means projecting from each plate means toward each other, said lance means being disposed adjacent the periphery of each of the apertures, said lance means of one plate means being a single lance means and being adapted to penetrate said sheet of conductive means, extend through the opposing aperture and be blunted to rivet said plate means together while the lance means of the other plate means include a plurality of lance means which are adapted to be bent away from the aperture thereof to grasp the sheet of conductive means in electrically conductive relationship between the plate means.

4. As an article of manufacture, an electrical connector for making electrical connection with a sheet of conductive means comprising plate means each provided with a plurality of apertures, the apertures in one plate means being oppositely disposed with respect to the apertures in the other plate means, lance means projecting from each plate means toward eachother, said lance-means being dispose-d adjacent the periphery of each of said apertures, some of the lance means on the plate means being a single lance means and beingv adapted to penetrate said sheet of conductive means, extend through the opposing apertures and be blunted to rivet said plate means together while the other complementary lance means include a plurality of lance means which are adapted to be bent away from the apertures thereof to grasp said sheet of conductive means in electrically conductive relationship between the Opposing plate means. I

5. An electrical connector according to claim 3 wherein said single lance means is diagonallydisposed with respect to the opposing aperture having a substantially rectangular configuration.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/ 1946 Great Britain.

JOHN F. BURNS, Primary Examiner. DARRELL CLAY, Examiner. Y

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2020408 *Nov 25, 1933Nov 12, 1935 Condenser foil terminal
US2623101 *May 12, 1951Dec 23, 1952Kurland Jerome JHermetically sealed electrical device
US3064072 *Jun 10, 1960Nov 13, 1962Bell Telephone Labor IncConnector for insulated conductors
US3138658 *Sep 27, 1961Jun 23, 1964Amp IncElectrical connector for very thin sheet metal member
GB578487A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3504101 *Sep 30, 1968Mar 31, 1970Amp IncElectric connector for aluminum foil
US3541226 *Dec 2, 1968Nov 17, 1970Amp IncElectrical connector for terminating multilayer conductive foil and corrugated insulation therefor
US3541227 *Nov 13, 1968Nov 17, 1970Amp IncTerminal for interconnecting foil conductor and wire conductor
US3617968 *Sep 22, 1969Nov 2, 1971Allis Chalmers Mfg CoConnector lead for electrical apparatus and combination thereof with said apparatus
US3640556 *Aug 22, 1969Feb 8, 1972Bennett Moreland PTab welded joint and method of making
US3752901 *Aug 23, 1971Aug 14, 1973Thomas & Betts CorpFoil connector
US4248493 *May 25, 1979Feb 3, 1981Thomas & Betts CorporationSelf-locking clamp member
US4263474 *May 30, 1979Apr 21, 1981Amp IncorporatedUnder carpet cable connector
US4420201 *Nov 9, 1981Dec 13, 1983Amp IncorporatedShielding assembly enclosing an electrical connector terminating shielded cable
US4687263 *May 27, 1986Aug 18, 1987Amp IncorporatedShielding kit for electrical connectors terminating multiconductor 360 degree shielded cable
US4832620 *Apr 7, 1988May 23, 1989E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyElectrical connector terminal for a flexible printed circuit board
US4834673 *Aug 23, 1988May 30, 1989Amp IncorporatedFlat cable power distribution system
US4859204 *May 13, 1988Aug 22, 1989Amp IncorporatedMethod of staking a wave crimp for flat power cable termination
US4859205 *May 13, 1988Aug 22, 1989Amp IncorporatedStrain relief for flat cable termination
US4867700 *Jan 13, 1989Sep 19, 1989Amp IncorporatedWave crimp for flat power cable termination
US4900264 *Apr 21, 1989Feb 13, 1990Amp IncorporatedElectrical connector and method of interconnecting flat power cables
US4902245 *Apr 21, 1989Feb 20, 1990Amp IncorporatedMethods and apparatus for terminating and interconnecting flat power cables
US4915650 *Apr 14, 1989Apr 10, 1990Amp IncorporatedElectrical terminals and method for terminating flat power cable
US4938713 *Apr 14, 1989Jul 3, 1990Amp IncorporatedElectrical terminal for wave crimp termination of flat power cable
US4949454 *Nov 8, 1989Aug 21, 1990Kabelmetal Electro GmbhMethod for making an electrical connection to a flat electrical conductor
US4950180 *Jul 19, 1989Aug 21, 1990Amp IncorporatedElectrical termination and method of terminating flat power cable
US4975080 *Dec 21, 1989Dec 4, 1990Amp IncorporatedLocking means for electrical interconnecting structures
US5219303 *Feb 13, 1992Jun 15, 1993Amp IncorporatedMid-cable electrical termination
US5299954 *Oct 21, 1992Apr 5, 1994Yazaki CorporationTerminal connecting structure for a flat circuit body
US5450664 *Nov 18, 1993Sep 19, 1995The Whitaker CorporationElectrical connector for mid-cable termination
US5855493 *Oct 20, 1997Jan 5, 1999The Whitaker CorporationElectrical connector strain relief with shield ground for multiple cables
US6267618 *Nov 1, 2000Jul 31, 2001Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd.Terminal fitting for flat conductor
US6439921 *Nov 1, 2000Aug 27, 2002Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd.Terminal fitting for flat conductor and method of connecting terminal fitting to flat conductor
US6626695 *Aug 9, 2002Sep 30, 2003The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd.Method of connecting flat cable and terminal
US8353650Dec 13, 2011Jan 15, 2013Hubbell IncorporatedBonding washer
US8608418Sep 14, 2012Dec 17, 2013Hubbell IncorporatedBonding washer
DE3937089A1 *Nov 7, 1989May 10, 1990Amp IncElectrical connection with tongues for thin foil conductor - secures low contact resistance by corrugation of base of connector crimped onto portion of foil
EP0020031A2 *May 2, 1980Dec 10, 1980AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation)Electrical connector for flat cable
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/94.00R, 439/422, 29/432, 29/509, 174/84.00R, 174/84.00C
International ClassificationH01R11/11, H01R11/20, H01R4/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R11/20, H01R4/2495
European ClassificationH01R11/20, H01R4/24F