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Publication numberUS3248532 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1966
Filing dateDec 27, 1963
Priority dateDec 27, 1963
Publication numberUS 3248532 A, US 3248532A, US-A-3248532, US3248532 A, US3248532A
InventorsSamuel D Bright
Original AssigneeSamuel D Bright
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Decorative low illumination lamp
US 3248532 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Apr'H 26, 1966 s. D. BRIGHT 3,248,532

NNNNNNN R ATTORNEYS April 1955 s. D. BRIGHT 3,248,532

DECORATIVE LOW ILLUMINATION LAMP Filed Dec. 27, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 WIIJIAFJQ'MJWMAVQIAVA a w 39 *MM Apxrfiii I256, 1966 Filed Dec.

5. D. BRIGHT 3,248,532

DECORATIVE LOW ILLUMINATION LAMP 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 IS z II '8 I i l mu I ids M J L lum AW I 1 I I ie uz l0 IB INVENTOR. SAMUEL D. BR I G HT AT TORNEYS United States Patent 3,248,532 DECORATIVE LQW ILLUMINATION LAMP Samuel 1). Bright, 525 Page Ave. NE., Atlanta, Ga. Filed Dec. 27, 1963, Ser. No. 333,803 4 Claims. (Cl. 240-40) This invention relates to lighting devices, and is more particularly concerned with a decorative, low illumination lamp. I

There are numerous situations in which some light is desired, but a very low level of illumination is preferred. For example, such low illumination is preferred for rooms at night when the light should be suflicient only to walk through a room without stumbling, for childrens rooms at night, for watching television at night, etc. In most cases, it is quite desirable to have a decorative item rather than a purely utilitarian item.

The device of the present invention provides a decorative, low illumination lamp that gives a diffused light for soft illumination; and, the device is adjustable to provide a greater intensity and amount of light when desired. The lamp is so constructed as to be readily adaptable to virtually any color scheme and any decorating motif. The device is very simple and light weight in construction and is designed to be very versatile in application.

These and other features of the present invention will become apparent from consideration of the following specification when taken in conjunction with the accompanying'drawings in which: I

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of one preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged exploded view of the mounting for the light source.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary exploded view showing the means of access to the interior of the lamp.

FIG. 6 is a view taken substantially along the line 6-6 in FIG. 1.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings and to that embodiment here chosen by way of illustration, the device includes a pair of side walls 10 and 11. Each of the side walls 10 and 11 is made of two pieces of material; an outer wall 12 is solid; and, an inner wall 14 is cut out to receive and support the various parts between the side walls 10 and 11. This construction will be described in more detail in connection with each of the parts.

Each of the side Walls 10 and 11 has a strip 15 along the front vertical edge, and a similar strip 16 along the rear vertical edge. The strips 15 and 16 give support to the walls 10 and 11, and conceal the edges of the material used in the walls. Another strip 18 is placed along each corner of the devicefor decorative purposes.

The lower ends of the walls 10 and 11 are attached to feet 19 and 20 respectively; and, the feet 19 and 20 are, in turn, attached to a base plate 21. The base plate 21 provides a wide, flat surface as a base for the device, and aids in holding the side walls 10 and 11 in proper spaced relationship.

A top plate 24 fits on the upper end of the device to hold the upper ends of the parts together. The exact construction will be discussed later.

Between the lower ends of the walls 10 and 11 there is a V-shaped trough 25. The ends of the trough are received ice in openings in the inner walls 14 and abut the outer walls 12. This gives support for the trough 25 in all directions and precludes any movement thereof. Along both upper edges of the V-shaped trough 25 there is a piece of trim 26 to give an aesthetically appealing design to the edge of the trough 25.

The inner surfaces of the trough 25 are covered with a thin, light reflecting material 28 such as sheet steel, aluminum or the like.

The source of light, generally designated at 29 is carried by the trough 25. The light source is shown in more detail in FIG. 5.

A bracket 30 has horizontal flanges 31 which are held by the trough 25. Fingers 32 curve upwardly from the bracket 30 to hold a bulb housing 34. The bulb housing 34 has, at one end thereof a clamping strip 35 which extends completely around the periphery of the bulb housing 34. At the ends of the clamping strip 35, there are ribs 36; and, at the outer extremities of the ribs 36, there are retaining bosses 38. The clamping strip 35, ribs 36 and bosses 38 removably retain the socket 39.

The socket 39 is substantially cylindrical, and has a circumferential groove 40. The usual receptacle 41 receives a light bulb 42.

It will now be seen that the socket 39 is placed in the clamping strip 35 with the ribs 36 received in the circumferential groove 40. The bosses 38 are too wide to fit into the groove 49. As the socket 39 is forced into the clamping strip, the ends of the strip will be forced apart until the socket is well down into the strip 35; then, the ends will close in, disposing the bosses 38 above the horizontal diameter of the socket. The socket is thus held in by the clamping force of the clamping strip 35. This arrangement is known in the art, hence, the socket and bulb housing should be understood from the above description.

In the embodiment of the invention here shown, the trough 25 is made of a foamed polystyrene material. This material has a readily rupturable, frangible cellular structure which allows the flanges 31 of the bracket 30 to be inserted into the'material of the trough 25, as shown in FIG.' 3. The bracket 30 is therefore very easy and quick to install, since the flanges 31 can be pushed, by hand, into the material of the trough 25.

There is thus provided a light source 29 mounted in the lower part of the lamp, and having reflecting surfaces 28 which will reflect light up.

In the upper part of the device, between the side wal's 10 and 11 there are front wall 45 and rear Wall 46 which converge at their lower ends, terminating slightly inside of the trough 25. The walls 45 and 46 extend up to terminate at the top plate 24.

The front and rear walls 45 and 46 are slidably received by slots, as slot 48 shown in FIG. 4, in the inner side wall 14. FIG. 4 shows the rear wall 46 raised partially, giving access to the inside of the device.

Attention is now directed to FIG. 6 of the drawings. In construction of the device so far described, all of the parts between the side walls 10 and 11 are received by slots in the inner side walls 14. To hold the side walls 10 and 11 together at their upper ends, the top plate 24 is cut out to fit the configuration of the upper end of the device. The opening in the top plate 24 fits along the outer side wall 12, around the strips 15 and 16, around the strips 18, and along the front and rear walls 45 and 46. This prevents outward movement of any of the parts.

A cover 49 is removably secured over the opening in the top plate 24. The securing means includes a pair of blocks 50 and 51 attached, as by gluing, to the upper, inside surface of the inner side walls 14 of the side walls and 11. To the top of the blocks 50 and 51 are fiXed nuts 52 and 54 which threadably receive screws passing through the cover 49 to hold the cover 49 against the top plate 24.

There are movable, light reflecting bafiles mounted below the front and rear walls 45 and 46. Rods 55 and 56 pass through both side walls 10 and 11, located approximately on the center line of the front and rear walls 45 and 46. The rods 55 and 56 preferably project somewhat into the slots, as slot 48; and, outwardly of one side wall, here shown as side wall 11, the rods have knobs 58 and 59 secured thereto by which to rotate the rods. Between the walls 10 and 11, the baflles 60 and 61 are attached to the rods. The baflles 60 and 61 may be made of any light reflecting material, though a lightweight metal or foil is preferred to make the baffles easy to manipulate.

The baffles 66 and 61 extend the full width of the device, between the side walls 10 and 11. The Width of the baffles 60 and 61 is such that, in one position (the position of baffle 60 as shown in the drawings) the baflie will engage the reflecting surface 28 of the trough 25; and, in the opposite extreme position (the position of baffle 61 as shown in the drawings) the baflle will reach about half way between the lower ends of the front and rear walls 45 and 46.

Each of the outer side Walls 12 has V-shaped projections 43 and 43'. The upper projections 43 are provided as convenient handles; and, though the lower projections 43 can be used as handles, the center of gravity of the device is above the lower projections 43, which will make the device diflicult to carry by the lower projections 43. The primary purpose of the lower projections 43 is therefore to serve as embellishments.

The V shape of the projections 43 and 43 as shown is designed to carry through the aesthetic plan of the device; the front and rear walls 45 and 46 converge at their lower ends; the trough 25 has Walls converging at their lower ends; hence, the projections 43 and 43' converge at their lower ends. Another aesthetic plan can be carried through by another design for the projections 43 and 43'.

From the foregoing description, the operation of the device should be apparent. The cover 49 is removed, and one of the front or rear walls 45 and 46 is slid up as in FIG. 4 so that a light bulb can be placed in the socket 39. The front Wall 45 or rear wall 46 is replaced and the cover 49 is replaced.

With both'of the baflies in the position of the baffle 60 in the drawings, the light is held in the space between the front wall 45 and rear wall 46, cover 49, and trough 25. The front and rear walls 45 and 46 are translucent, which will allow some of the light to pass therethrough. Other surfaces may be translucent if desired. Some of the light will of course be absorbed by all of the surrounding walls, allowing only a portion of the light to pass through the translucent walls. This will give a very low intensity light; and, due to the cellular structure of the foamed polystyrene walls, the light will be diffused, giving a very soft light.

If both the baffles 60 and 61 be positioned as the baffle 61 in the drawings, the space between the front and rear walls 45 and 46 will be closed off, but the spaces between the trough 25 and front and rear walls 45 and 46 will be open; hence, light will be reflected out through the space. The reflecting surface 28 will direct the light against the outside surfaces of the front and rear walls 45 and 46 to illuminate a picture '70 painted on the wall.

Since the light is now reflected off the surfaces, and partially directed straight through the space between the trough 25 and the front and rear walls 45 and 46,

the light will be of greater intensity; and, the light that is reflected from the surfaces of the walls and 46 will be somewhat diffused by the cellular structure, giving less diffusion to the light.

The above description considers the two extreme positions of the baffles and 61. It will be understood that any position between the two extremes can be used by manipulating the knobs 58 and 59. The pressure of the front and rear walls 45 and 46 against the rods 55 and 56 will hold the rods in any set position, yet will allow movement when desired.

It will thus be seen that the device of the present in vention provides a simple lamp that has a variety or uses. The picture 70 can contain any colors to match the desired color scheme; and the design of the picture 70, as well as the various stylings and embellishments on the lamp can be designed to fit into any decorating motif.

The lamp here presented is described as being constructed of a foamed polystyrene. This material is desirable because it is light in weight, translucent, and is soft enough so that the bracket 30 can be easily inserted into the trough 25. The material is best joined by gluing or the like, though other means may be used.

It will be realized by those skilled in the art that the device of the present invention can be formed of numerous other materials. For the translucent portions, glass, or a plastic such as methyl methacrylate can be used; for the opaque portions, wood, metal or numerous other materials can be used to suit the particular design.

It will of course be understood that the embodiment here presented is by way of illustration only, and is meant to be in no way restrictive; therefore, numerous changes and modifications may be made, and the full use of equivalents resorted to without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as outlined in the appended claims.

I claim:

-1. A lamp including a trough, side Walls on each end of said trough, a light source Within and supported by said trough, front and rear walls between said side walls and above said trough, said front and rear walls extending from the uppermost end of said side walls into said trough, and converging toward said trough, a cover over the opening formed by said side walls and said front and rear walls, bafiles at the lowermost end of said front and rear walls and movable to close the space between the lower end of said front and rear walls, and to close the space between said front wall and said trough and the space between said rear wall and said trough.

2. A lamp including side walls, each of said side Walls including an inner side wall and an outer side Wall, a base connecting the lower ends of said side walls, a trough disposed between said side walls, said trough being supported in an opening in each of said inner side walls and abutting each of said outer walls, a front wall and a rear wall between said side Walls, said front and rear walls being received in slots in said inner side walls and abutting said outer side walls, a top plate having an opening therein, said opening being of substantially the same dimensions and configuration as the upper periphery of the structure formed by said side walls and said front and rear walls, said opening in said top plate receiving said structure for holding said structure together, and a cover over said opening.

3. The device as claimed in claim 2 in which said front and rear walls are made of translucent material.

4. A lamp including side walls, each of said side Walls including an inner side Wall and an outer side Wall, a

base connecting the lower ends of said side walls, a

trough disposed between said side walls, said trough being supported in an opening in each of said inner side walls and abutting each of said outer side walls, a light source disposed in said trough and supported by said trough, a front wall and a rear wall between said side walls, said front and rear walls being received in slots in said inner side walls and abutting said outer side walls, the lower ends of said front and rear walls being within said trough, a top plate having an opening therein, said opening being substantially the same dimensions and configuration as the upper periphery of the structure formed by said side walls and said front and rear walls, said opening in said top plate receiving said structure for holding said structure together, a cover over said opening, a pair of rods extending through said side walls, light reflecting baffles on said rods, said baflles being movable to cover the space between said front and rear walls or to close the spaces between said front and rear walls and said trough.

NORTON ANSHER,

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Harrison 240-78 Schepmoes 240---7.35 Pearson 24010 Rupp 40130 Reynolds 2404l.l Horky 240-40 Dames 2408.16 Kurianski 240--l0 Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1514616 *Sep 16, 1920Nov 11, 1924Harrison Haydn ThiesFitting for lighting purposes
US1786962 *Feb 15, 1929Dec 30, 1930Safety Car Heating & LightingLighting fixture
US1843781 *Jan 8, 1931Feb 2, 1932William S PearsonLamp shade
US1936734 *Jun 25, 1932Nov 28, 1933Max G RuppIlluminated sign
US2228329 *Dec 7, 1938Jan 14, 1941Howard G ReynoldsAutomobile nonglare headlight
US2359559 *Jul 14, 1942Oct 3, 1944Charles A HorkyDecorative device
US2537971 *Dec 19, 1944Jan 16, 1951Jr Ralph J DamesInstrument illumination
US2831963 *Jul 14, 1954Apr 22, 1958Kurianski StanislanOrnamental lamp or light fixture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6113249 *Feb 25, 1999Sep 5, 2000Ziegler; AndrewLamp and picture assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/283, 362/806, 362/812
International ClassificationF21S8/00, F21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00, Y10S362/812, F21W2121/00, Y10S362/806
European ClassificationF21V33/00