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Publication numberUS3250271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1966
Filing dateApr 29, 1963
Priority dateApr 29, 1963
Also published asDE6603330U
Publication numberUS 3250271 A, US 3250271A, US-A-3250271, US3250271 A, US3250271A
InventorsJack Lippes
Original AssigneeJack Lippes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intrauterine device
US 3250271 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

about 23 to about 25 millimeters.

United States Patent O M' 3,250,271 INTRAUTERINE DEVICE Jack Lippes, 64 Curtis Parkway, Tonawanda, N.Y. Filed Apr. 29, 1963, Ser. No. 276,597 9 Claims. (Cl. 12S-130) This invention relates to an intrauterine device, and more particularly to such a device useful for contraceptive purposes.

It is a known medical fact that a foreign object in the uterus will prevent conception. Heretofore, different Y tion or in any other way adversely affect the well-being of v .the wearer.

A further object is to provide such an intrauterine device any undesired displacement of which from the uterus following proper insertion therein can be detected.

Still another object is to provide such an intrauterine device which is simple in construction, easy to manufacture and relatively inexpensive.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which:

, FIG. l is a side elevational view, partly in section, of

an instrument in operative position for inserting into a uterus the inventive intrauterine device, also shown in substantially straightened out form and arranged on the instrument.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 insofar as illustration of the uterus is concerned and showing the intrauterine device in operative position therewithin following its insertion and withdrawal of the aforesaid inserting instrument, a portion of the tail forming part of the device which is cut olf following insertion being illustrated in broken lines.

FIG. is a side elevational view of the intrauterine device in the operative sinuous configuration which it normally assumes, and showing the critical dimensions of the isosceles trapezoid within whose imaginary boundaries the device in its normal sinuous form is confined.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged transverse sectional view of the inserting instrument with the intrauterine device arranged thereon and taken on line 4 4 of FIG. i.

FIG. 5 is a left end elevational view of the intrauterine device shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view thereof taken on line 6 6 of FIG. 3.

The inventive intrauterine device is shown as comprising an elongated or bar-like body 1I) of tiexible material arranged in sinuous or serpentine form substantially in one plane within the imaginary boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid having a short boundary side 11, a parallel long side 12, and a pair of non-parallel boundary sides 13 and 14 of equal length. The dimensions of such sides are critical. The short side 11 has a length falling in the range of from about 15 to about i8 millimeters. The long side 12 has a length falling in the range of from about 25 to about 30 millimeters. Each of the non-parallel sides 13 and 14 has a length falling in the range of from As shown, the device Patented May 10, 1966 has two nodes or reverse curves on each side of the body, those on the left being designed 13' and 13" and those on the right being designated 14 and 14". Referring to FIG. 3, it will be noted that the sinuous body 10 is conlined entirely within the boundary sides 11-14 of the isosceles trapezoid, the boundary side 13 being tangent to the one pair of nodes 13 and 13" and the boundary side 14 being tangent to the other pair of nodes 14 and 14". These nodes are connected to progress from one end of the body 10 to the other end thereof successively reversing their directions of curvature. Thus, as viewed in FIG. 3, starting from the upper and large end of body 10 and moving toward the lower and small end thereof, node 13l curves in a counterclockwise direction, node 14 in a clockwise direction, node 13" in a counterclockwise direction, and node 14 in a clockwise direction. The terminal portions of bar-like body 10', one being the body part between node 13 and the adjacent free end and the other being the body part between node 14" and the adjacent free end, are severally contacted by a parallel boundary sides 11 and 12.

The body 10 may be round or non -round such as oblong in cross-section as shown in FIG. 6 andpreferably has a major dimension in cross-section of about 0.080 inch, and a length when straightened out of about 4.5 inches.

The intrauterine device also comprises a thread-like tail 15 of flexible material connected at one end to that end of the body 10 at the short side 11 of the aforementioned trapezoid. Preferably, the tail 15 is provided by inserting a length of a single thread through a hole 101 in the end portion of the body 10 until about half the length of the thread has passed through the hole. Then the two thread portions are tied into a knot indicated at leaving two strands 151 and 152. However, a single strand tail may be used'and it may be suitably attached to the body 10 other than by being tied thereto.

The tail 15 may be round or non-round in cross-section and is preferably smaller in cross-section than the body` 16. The length of the tail 15 is about 2.5 inches.

The intrauterine device may be made of any suitable flexible material. While the body portion 10i and the tail portion 15 may be made of different materials, it is preferred that they be made of the same material. It is preferred to make the device of polyethylene with the body portion 1,0 composed of low density polyethylene and the tail portion 15 composed of linear polyethylene. Ihave found a surgical thread having a thickness of about 0.007 inch particularly useful to provide the tail. If a single strand tail is employed it may be molded integrally with or fused to the body of the device.

Regardless of what material the device is made of, it is essential that the body 10 provides a resilient member capable of being substantially straightened out and upon release thereafter returning to its sinuous form as illustrated. In the case of polyethylene, this can be conveniently achieved by molding the body 10 in its sinuous form so that when straightened out, it has memory or a resistance to cold flow which causes it to return to its sinuous configuration.

Viewed in another manner, the inventive intrauterine device comprisesv a bar-like body of flexible material curved in a substantially flat plane in the shape of a large S continuing intoa smaller S, the body being capable of being substantially straightened out and upon release tending to return to such continuous double S- curved shape.

If desired about 20% by volume of barium sulfate may be mixed with the plastic material to render devices molded therefrom visible to X-ray examination.

The reason why the aforementioned resilient characteristic of the body portion 10 of the intrauterine device is important will now be apparent when the mode of inserting the device into an uterus is considered.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, an uterus is represented at U having a cavity 16 in the inner portion or fundus of the uterus which communicates with the vagina (not shown) by a neck portion or isthmus 17.

The inserting instrument represented generally by the numeral 18 is shown as comprising a sleeve or tube 19 and a plunger 20 freely slidably arranged therein. The sleeve or tube 19 has a gradually turning or curved inner portion as indicated at 21, and while it may be made of a rigid material it is preferably made of a flexible plastic material such as one of the long chain fluorinated polymers of ethylene such as tetrauoroethylene, known under one'trademark as Teon. In cross section, the sleeve or tube 19 may be round, or non-round such as being oblong.

The plunger 20 is made of a flexible material since it must follow the contour of the passage in the sleeve or tube 19, and is also preferably made of Teflon. The cross-section of the plunger 20 corresponds generally to that of the sleeve or tube 19, expt that the plunger is provided with a longitudinal groove 22.

In use of the instrument 18, the sleeve or tube 19 and plunger 20 are first separated. The body portion 10 of the intrauterine ldevice is then fed into the sleeve or tube 19, with the free end remote from the tail portion 15 being inserted into the end of the sleeve or tube remote from the curved portion 21. In the course of so inserting the body portion 10, it is straightened' out against its natural urging of assuming its sinuous form. When the body portion has been substantially completely inserted within the sleeve or tube 19, the tail portion 15 is placed in the groove 22 in the plunger 20, such groove being large enough to receive the tail portion. The end of the plunger 20 adjacent the trailing end of the straightened out body portion is then inserted into the sleeve or tube 19. Partial insertion of the tail portion within the groove y22 isv depicted in FIG. 1, in which the partial insertion of the plunger 20 within the sleeve or tube 191 is also illustrated. The leading end of the plunger 20 thrustingly bears against the rearwardly facing shoulder 23 formed by the trailing end of the body portion 10 due to the difference in thickness of the tail portion 15.

With the intrauterine device so arranged on the instrument 18, the assembly is inserted into the vagina (not shown) and partially into the uterine cavity 16 through the isthmus 17 as illustrated in FIG. l. Thereafter, the plunger 20 with the tail portion arranged within the groove 22, is gradually pushed into the sleeve or tube 19.

As the body portion 10 enters the uterine cavity 16, it returns to its sinuous form, as shown in FIG. 2. The plunger 20, which is longer than the sleeve or tube 19, is continued to be pushed inwardly thereof until the entire body portion 10 is accommodated within the uterine cavity 16 and the tail portion 15 is left extending through the isthmus 17. Thereafter the instrument 18 is Withdrawn and the portion of the tail extending outwardly of the isthmus 17 may be cut oi. Such cut-olf portion is shown at 15a inFIG. 2.

Instead of utilizing an inserting instrument for the intrauterine device in which the plunger has a groove such as the groove 22, the plunger may have enough clearance between its periphery and the internal surface of the guide sleeve or tube as will accommodate the tail portion 15 of the device and still be freely slidable within the sleeve or tube.

Clinical studies have shown that the intrauterine device remains in the operative position shown in FIG. 2 and does not rotatively move within the uterine cavity so as to draw thereinto the tail 15. The device may be left within the uterus for months or years and will remain in its operative position during such time. In case it is desired to remove the device, this is readily accomplished by grasping the free end of the tail 15 with a suitable inl strument such as forceps (not shown) and thereafter gradually pulling the device outwardly of the uterus through the isthmus 17. In being so removed, the body portion 10 straightens out substantially to pass through the isthmus 17 without discomfort.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the embodiment of the present invention illustrated accomplishes the various objects stated and is illustrative rather than limitative of the invention, the scope of which is to be measured by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An` intrauterine device, comprising an elongated body arranged in sinuous form in substantially one'plane withinthe imaginary boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid including a pair of opposite non-parallel boundary sides and a pair of opposite parallel boundary sides, such sinuous body having a pair of nodes on each of two opposite sides thereof and a terminal portion at each end, one of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to one node pair and the other of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to the other node pair,`said nodes being connected to progress from one end of said body to the other end thereof successively reversing their direc tions of curvature, said parallel boundary sides severally contacting said terminal portions.

2. An intrauterine device, comprising an elongated body of exible material arranged in sinuous form in substantially one plane within the imaginary boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid including opposite parallel long and short boundary sides and a pair of opposite nonparallel boundary sides, such sinuous body having a pair of nodes at each of two opposite sides thereof and a terminal portion at each end, one of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to one node pair and the other of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to the other node pair, said nodes being connected to progress from one end of said body to the other end thereof successively reversing theirl directions of curvature, said parallel boundary sides severally contacting said terminal portions, and a exible tail connected to the free end of that terminal portion of said body at said short boundary side of said trapezoid.

3. An intrauterine device, comprising an elongated body of flexible material arranged in sinuous form in substantially one plane within the imaginary boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid having short, lon'g and nonparallel boundary sides, said short boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about 15 to about 18 millimeters, said long boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about 25 to about 30 millimeters and said non-parallel boundary sides severally having a length falling in the range of from about 23 to about 25 millimeters, such sinuous body having a pair of nodes on each of two opposite sides thereof and a terminal portion at each end, one of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to one node pair and the other of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to the other node pair, said nodes being connected to progress from one end of said body to the other end thereof successively reversing their directions of curvature, said parallel boundary sides severally contacting said terminal portions.

4. An intrauterine device, comprising an elongated body of exible material arranged in sinuous form in substantially one plane within the imaginary boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid having short, long and nonparallel boundary sides, said short boundary side having a length falling in the range of `from about 15 to about 18 millimeters, said long boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about 25 to about 30 millimeters and said non-parallel boundary sides severally having a length falling in the range of from about 23 to about 25 millimeters, such sinuous body having a pair of nodes on each of two opposite sides thereof and a terminal portion at each end, one of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to the one node pair and the other of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to the other node pair, said nodes being connected to progress from one end of said body to the other end thereof successively reversing their directions of curvature, said parallel boundary sides severally contacting said terminal portions, and a flexible tail connected to the free end of that terminal portion of said body at said short boundary side of said trapezoid.

5. An intrauterine device, comprising a bar-like body of exible material arranged in sinuous form in substantially one plane to provide a resilient member conned within the imaginary boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid having short, long and non-parallel boundary sides, saidshort boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about l5 to about 18 millimeters, said long boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about 25 to about 30 millimeters and said nonparallel boundary sides severally having a length falling in the range of from about 23 to about 25 millimeters, said member when in said sinuous form having a pair of nodes on each of two opposite sides thereof and a terminal portion at each end, one of said non-parallel boundary sides beingtangent to one node pair and the other of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to the other node pair, said nodes being connected to progress from one end of said body to the other end thereof successively reversing their directions of curvature, said parallel boundary sides severally contacting said terminal portions, said member being capable of being substantially straightened out and upon release thereafter returning to said sinuous form on its own.

6. An intrauterine device, comprising a bar-like body of exible material arranged in sinuous form in substantially one plane to provide a resilient member confined within the imaginady boundaries of an isosceles trapezoid having short, long and nonaparallel boundary sides, said short boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about to 18 millimeters, said long boundary side having a length falling in the range of from about 25 to 30 millimeters and said non-parallel boundary sides severally having a length falling in the range of from about 23 to about 25 millimeters, said member when in said sinuous form having a pair of nodes on each of two opposite sides thereof and a terminal portion at each end, one of said non-parallel boundary sides being tangent to one node pair and the other of said non-parallel'boundary sides being tangent to the other node pair, said nodes being connected to progress from one end of said body to the other end thereof successively reversing their directions of curvature, said parallel boundary sides severally contacting said terminal portions, 4said member being capable of being substantially straightened out and upon relief thereafter returning to said sinuous form on its own, and a exible thread-like tail connected to the free end of that terminal portion of said body at said short boundary side of said trapezoid.

7. An intrauterine device as set forth in claim 5 wherein said member when substantially straightened out `has a length of about 4.5 inches.

8. An intrauterine devices, comprising a bar-like body of llexible material curved in a substantially fiat plane in the shape of a large S continuing into a smaller S, said body being capable of being substantially straightened out and upon release thereafter .tending to return to such continuous double S-curved shape.

9. An intrauterine device, comprising a bar-like body of flexible material curved in a substantially flat plane in the shape of a large S continuing into a smaller S, said body being capable of being substantially straightened out and upon release thereafter tending to return to such continuous double S-curved shape, said body adjacent the free end of such smaller S-shaped portion having a hole, and a thread passing through said hole and tied into a knot intermediate its ends to provide a two-strand tail.

References Cited bythe Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 328,553 10/1885 Warmoth 128-127 662,716 11/1900 Gaedeke 12S-130 1,896,071 2/1933 Clark 128--130 2,176,559 10/1939 Meckstroth 128-130 2,756,752 7/1956 Scherlis 12S-303 3,200,815 8/1965 Malrguiles 12B-130 RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. D. L. TRULUCK, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3306286 *Apr 13, 1965Feb 28, 1967Schueler & CompanyIntrauterine device
US3312214 *Jun 6, 1966Apr 4, 1967Lalor Burdick CharlesIntra-uterine device
US3319625 *Jul 6, 1966May 16, 1967Paul Appleby BasilIntra-uterine contraceptive device
US3374788 *Oct 24, 1965Mar 26, 1968Deseret Pharmaceutical CompanyContraceptive devices and methods
US3397691 *Jun 2, 1966Aug 20, 1968Gregory MajzlinIntra-uterine contraceptive device
US3398737 *Oct 18, 1965Aug 27, 1968Hylton F.G. SheppardIntrauterine contraceptives
US3448737 *Aug 16, 1966Jun 10, 1969Ortho Pharma CorpInsertion unit
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US3509877 *Aug 24, 1967May 5, 1970Weiss Leonard SIntra-uterine contraceptive device and method of using same
US3590816 *Mar 22, 1968Jul 6, 1971Schmid Inc JuliusPlacement unit for intrauterine contraceptive devices
US3675647 *Aug 5, 1970Jul 11, 1972Alza CorpIntrauterine contraceptive device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/839
International ClassificationA61F6/14, A61F6/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F6/142
European ClassificationA61F6/14B