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Publication numberUS3251232 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1966
Filing dateJun 25, 1964
Priority dateJun 25, 1964
Also published asDE1465181B1
Publication numberUS 3251232 A, US 3251232A, US-A-3251232, US3251232 A, US3251232A
InventorsHarper George S
Original AssigneeAirpax Electronics
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toggle mechanism for circuit breakers
US 3251232 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 17, 1966 G. s. HARPER 3,251,232

TOGGLE MECHANISM FOR CIRCUIT BREAKERS Filed June 25, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet l May 17, 1966 Filed June 25, 1964 G. S. HARPER TOGGLE MECHANISM FOR CIRCUIT BREAKERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 May 17, 1966 e. s. HARPER TOGGLE MECHANISM FOR CIRCUIT BREAKERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 25, 1964 May 17, 1966 s HARPER 3,251,232

TOGGLE MECHANISM FOR CIRCUIT BREAKERS Filed June 25, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent 3,251,232 TOGGLE MECHANISM FOR CIRCUIT BREAKERS George S. Harper, Cambridge, Md., assignor to Airpax Electronics Incorporated, Cambridge, Md., a corporation of Maryland Filed June 25, 1964, Ser. No. 377,993 7 Claims. (Cl. 74-2) This invention relates to a toggle mechanism for a circuit breaker. 1

Circuit breakers are often mounted on supports which are subject to shocks and/or vibrations of such violence and magnitude as to cause unwanted operation of the mechanism to open the circuit.

It is an object of this invention to provide a mechanism for maintaining the circuit closed under conditions of great mechanical shock and/or vibration but which can be operated to quickly open the circuit under predetermined electric current conditions.

It is alsoan object of this invention to provide a mechanism as aforesaid whereby the tenacity of the mechanism to maintain the circuit closed can be releasedby a light tripping force.

It is a further object of this invention to produce a mechanism as aforesaid which is simple and reliable and in which the arrangement of parts lends itselfto quick and easy assembly.

These and other objects of the invention Will be manifest from the following description and accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 shows the mechanism in a position where the contacts are closed.

FIG. 2 shows the mechanism in a position Where the contacts are open.

FIG. 3 shows the mechanism in an intermediate postion.

FIG. 4 is a section taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a section taken on the line 55 of FIG. 3 with certain parts omitted.

FIG. 6 is a view showing the symmetrical relationship of a part of the toggle mechanism.

FIG. 7 is a view showing a modified mounting for the contact carrying arm.

FIG. 8 is a view on line 88 of FIG. 7.

In the drawings is shown a metal housing 2 having secured thereto a threaded bushing 4 in which is pivotally mounted a toggle handle or lever 6 on a pivot 8. A housing 10 of insulating material is fitted in the metal housing 2 and is closed by a cover member 12 of insulating material and maintained in assembled relation by a metal cover member 14 secured to housing 2.

Terminals 16, 18 are mounted by insulators 16', 18' in member 14. Terminal 16 has integral therewith a terminal 20 and terminal 18 has secured thereto a fixed contact 22 for cooperation with a movable contact 24 carried by a lever 26 pivotally and slidably mounted on a frame 28 by means of a pin 30 secured to the frame 28 and extending through a slot 32 in the lever 26. A spring 34 is wound about pin 30 and is provided with a biasing arm 36 bearing against lever 26 and reaction arms 38 hearing against the frame 28.

A lever 40 of insulating material is pivotally mounted on the frame 28 by a pivot rod 42 secured to the frame and is provided with a socket portion 44 for reception of the end of lever 6. Movement of the lever 6 about pivot 8 rotates the lever 40 about pivot 42.

A U-shaped lever 46 (shown in FIG. 5) is pivotally connected to the lever 40 by a pivot 48 and a lever 50 is pivotally connected to lever 26 by a pivot connection 52. The lever 50 is formed with parallel sides connected by a bridge piece 51 integral therewith and straddles lever 26 to form a structure which is symmetrical to avoid any tendency for the levers to bind or to bend the connecting pivot. The lever 46 is also formed with parallel sides which are connected by bridge pieces 47 to form an integral symmetrical structure which straddles lever 50. Levers 46 and 50 are pivotally connected by a pivot connection 54. An L-shaped forked lever 56 is pivotally connected to the end of one of the legs of the U-shaped lever 46 by a pivot connection 58 and is shaped to allow the. entrance and exit of a pin 60, secured to lever 50, into and out of the fork groove 61.

A shaft 62 is rotatably mounted on the U-shaped lever 46 and is provided with a reduced section 64 which will allow the passage of the lever 56 when rotated to the position shown in FIG. 3 but which will prevent rotation of the lever 56 when positioned as shown in FIG. 1. The shaft is also provided with an abutment in the form of a pin 66 fixed thereto.

A bell crank lever 68 is pivoted on a rod 70 fixed to the frame and has one arm 72 adjacent an electromagnet 74 and another arm 76 which can contact and rotate the pin 66 when electromagnet 74 is energized to attract arm 72. The pin 66 is urged by a spring 78 into contact with an abutment 80 carried by lever 46. A second abutment 82 carried by the lever 46 serves as a reaction element for the spring 78.

The circuit breaker is shown in FIG. 1 with the contacts 22, 24 biased together by spring 34. As a consequence the reaction force of spring 34 on pivot 52 loads the levers 46 and 50 to tend to collapse them into the position shown in FIG. 3. However collapse is prevented by the fit of pin 60 in the fork groove 61. The force of pin 60 against lever 56 tends to pivot the lever 56 about pivot 58 and into contact with shaft 62. Since the lever 56 is prevented by the shaft 62 from rotating to release the pin 60, the levers 46 and 50 are maintained locked in the position shown in FIG. 1. Only shocks and/or vibrations of such'violence, magnitude, and character that can rotate shaft 62 against the bias of spring 78 can cause unwanted collapse of the toggle mechanism. Upon the occurrence of an overload the electromagnet 74 is energized to attract arm 72 and to cause pivoting of the bell-crank lever 68 about pivot 70. A pad 84 carried by the arm 76 is carried into contact with abutment pin 66 to thereby rotate shaft 62. Rotation of the shaft from the locking position shown in FIG. 1 to the unlocking position as shown in FIG. 3 presents the reduced section 62 to the end of the lever 56 to allow the lever to rotate to the position shown in FIG. 3 to thereby release pin 60 and allow the collapse of the linkage .46, 50 to the position shown. The collapse of the linkage allows movement of lever 26 relative to pin 30 and thus separate the contacts 22, 24. The are chute 86 serves to extinguish the are drawn by the separating contacts.

Springs 88 are wrapped about pivot 42 and have biasing arms 90 urging pivot 48 about the pivot 42 and have a reaction arm 92 bearing against the frame 28 shown as a segment in FIG. 1. Immediately upon the collapse of the linkage to the position shown in FIG. 3, the arm 90 moves pivot 48 and its connected lever 46 carrying lever 56 to the position shown in FIG. 2 whereby pin 60 is again received in fork groove 61 and lever 56 held captive by shaft'62 to reform the toggle. The parts come to rest in the position shown in FIG. 2.

To reset the device lever 6 is rotated counterclockwise about pivot 8. This rotates lever 40 clockwise about pivot 42 to carry pivot 48 about this pivot until it comes to rest against a stop not shown. The levers 46, 50

. locked against pivoting relative to each other are moved sliding of the contacts over each other gives the contacts a self-cleaning action.

A modified mounting for lever 26 is shown in FIGS. 7 V

and 8 wherein the lever is pivoted on pin 98, and pin 98 is pivotally connected to links 100 which are pivotally mounted on pins 102 secured to frame 28. A spring 104 is wound about pin 98 and is provided with a biasing arm 106 bearing against lever 26 and reaction arms 108 bearing against the links 100.

What is claimed is:

1. A toggle mechanism comprising a first lever pivotally and slidably mounted on a frame, a second lever pivotally mounted on the frame, a pair of levers pivotally connected to each other and to said first and second levers respectively, means for locking said pair of levers against pivotal movement with respect to each other, and means for unlocking said locking means to permit pivotal movement of said pair of levers with respect to each other, said locking means comprising a forked lever pivotally carried by one of said pair of levers, a pin received in the fork carried by the other of said pair of levers, and means holding the forked lever against pivotal movement.

2. A mechanism as in claim 1 wherein the means holding the forked lever against pivotal movement comprises a shaft rotatably mounted on said one of said pair of levers and having a reduced section, means for maintaining the shaft against rotation with the reduced section out of contact with the lever, and means urging said forked lever, into contact with the shaft.

3. A mechanism as in claim 2 wherein the means for unlocking the locking means comprises means for rotating the shaft to present the reduced portion of the shaft to the lever;

4. A mechanism as in claim 3 wherein the means for rotating the shaft comprises an abutment secured to the shaft and a lever pivoted on the frame for contact with the abutment.

5. A mechanism as in claim 3 wherein the means for rotating the shaft comprises a bell-crank lever, an electromagnet mounted on the frame adjacent one arm of the crank for attracting said arm upon a predetermined current condition, and an abutment carried by the shaft in the path of movement of the other arm of the crank for actuation thereby.

6. A toggle mechanism comprising a first lever, link means pivot-ally mounting said lever on a frame, a second lever pivotally mounted on the frame, a pair of levers pivotally connected to each other and to said first and second levers respectively, means for locking said pair of levers against pivotal movement with respect to each other, and means for unlocking said locking means to permit pivotal movement of said pair of levers with respect to each other.

7. A toggle mechanism as in claim 6 wherein the link means comprises a pair of links pivotally mounted on the frame and pivotally connected to the first lever.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,556,054 6/1951 Allan et al 74---2 X 2,802,922 8/1957 Page et a1 200-164 FOREIGN PATENTS 708,012 7/1941 Germany.

MILTON KAUFMAN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2556054 *Jul 30, 1945Jun 5, 1951Reyrolle A & Co LtdSpring-driven operating mechanism for electric switchgears
US2802922 *Sep 13, 1954Aug 13, 1957Gen ElectricContact arm assembly for circuit interrupter
DE708012C *Oct 2, 1936Jul 10, 1941Siemens AgKleinschnellschalter mit UEbestromausloeser fuer elektrische Haus- und Gewerbeanlagen
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3486140 *Nov 13, 1967Dec 23, 1969Airpax ElectronicsCircuit breaker with positive relatch
US3492614 *Jan 18, 1968Jan 27, 1970Westinghouse Electric CorpCircuit breaker with thrust transmitting operating mechanism
US3505622 *Nov 21, 1968Apr 7, 1970Ite Imperial CorpCurrent limiting circuit breaker with collapsible cradle structure
US3754108 *Sep 10, 1971Aug 21, 1973Electrical Protection Co LtdCircuit breaker toggle mechanism with spring-biased latch plate
US4885558 *May 22, 1986Dec 5, 1989Airpax CorporationCircuit breaker
US4926157 *May 3, 1988May 15, 1990AirpaxCircuit breaker
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/2, 335/191, 200/401, 335/174
International ClassificationH01H71/52, H01H73/00, H01H71/54, H01H71/10, H01H73/44
Cooperative ClassificationH01H71/528
European ClassificationH01H71/52E