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Publication numberUS3251419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1966
Filing dateOct 24, 1963
Priority dateOct 24, 1963
Publication numberUS 3251419 A, US 3251419A, US-A-3251419, US3251419 A, US3251419A
InventorsHoward John W
Original AssigneeGen Fire Extinguisher Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve apparatus for use with dry chemical fire extinguisher
US 3251419 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 7, 1966 J. w. HOWARD 3,251,419

VALVE APPARATUS FOR USE WITH DRY CHEMICAL FIRE VEXTINGUISHER Filed Oct. 24, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 m A d; V l5 i I" I a i 'i 46 I I :5 .l I. ii i 45 i a 1, I! I 47 i: J INVENTOR. 2 4 JOHN W. HOWARD BYWd ma ATTORNEYS May 17, 1966 J. w. HOWARD VALVE APPARATUS FOR USE WITH DRY CHEMICAL FIRE EXTINGUISHER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 24, 1963 I/ll/ v/l I FIG.5.

USA.

INVENTOR. JOHN W. HOWARD Bywflmma ATTORNEYS FIG.6.

United States Patent 3,251,419 VALVE APPARATUS FOR USE WITH DRY CHEMICAL FIRE EXTINGUISHER John W. Howard, Pacific Palisades, Califi, assignor to The General Fire Extinguisher Corporation, a corporation of California Filed Oct. 24, 1963, Ser. No. 318,546

Claims. (Cl. 169-9) This invention generally relates to dry chemical fire extinguishing equipment and more particularly concerns dry chemical fire extinguishers of the type wherein a separate pressurized gas cylinder is employed as a means of creating pressure to discharge the dry chemical or fire extinguishing powder.

More specifically, the invention relates to a valve construction designed to co-function with certain other parts of the fire extinguishing apparatus for the purpose of primarily achieving the objectives of releasing residual gas pressure in the dry chemical tank after it has been used and at the same time clearing out the conduit and nozzle through which the powder has been discharged.

It will be appreciated, however, that this valve unit embodied in the combination of the present invention may be used in other diverse applications.

Certain problems have arisen in the past in that upon completion of a given period of use of the fire extinguisher, the dry chemical being discharged through the hose or conduit may become packed therein at the time the pressure is released. In consequence, the apparatus may not be in proper condition for operation under the next emergency conditions. Furthermore, it is desirable to release the pressure by allowing the gas to escape that may remain in the dry powder tank such that the possibility of packing of the dry powder in the powder tube and valve unit will also be avoided in this regard.

Certain efiorts have been made in this field, as disclosed, for example, in Patent No. 2,473,349, issued to W. E. Snowden, entitled Dry Chemical Fire Extinguisher and Patent No. 2,642,944, issued to Walden Allen, entitled Apparatus for Clearing Conduits in Dry Chemical Fire Extinguishing Systems.

It is believed, however, that the present invention effects certain advantages not attained in either of the constructions as disclosed in the aforementioned patents. More particularly, in the present invention, a novel valve unit is used in which several functions are performed. In a first or open position, the valve unit permits gas from the pressurized gas or nitrogen cylinder to flow into the powder tank and force powder outwardly therefrom through a discharge tube and coupled hose. In a second position or closed position, the valve unit performs three functions:

(1) The valve unit closes olf the discharge tube and powder hose;

(2) The valve unit opens up the upper part of the powder tank (through the inlet gas tube) to atmosphere; and,

(3) The valve unit forms a direct passage or by-pass passage from the pressurized gas cylinder to the outlet powder conduit whereby the same may be cleared by permitting the pressurized gas to 110W directly thereto by-passing the powder tank.

A first passage means is provided in the valve means; the first passage means connects the gas tube to the gas inlet line in the first position, and a second passage means is provided to simultaneously connect the powder tube to a powder discharge line. In addition, a third passage means is provided to connect the gas inlet tube to atmosphere in the second, closed position, the valve means being designed to close off the powder tube and to connect the gas inlet line directly to the powder outlet line in the second position of the valve. means.

A better understanding of the presentinvention will be had by reference to the drawings, showing merely one illustrative embodiment, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic or schematic drawing disclosing the general fire extinguishing apparatus in which the present invention is embodied;

FIGURE 2 is the section taken through the valve unit and inter-coupled powder tube and gas inlet tube of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a section taken in the direction of the arrows 33 of FIGURE 2, said FIGURES 2 and 3 disclosing the valve unit in its first or open position;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view similar to FIGURE 2 disclosing the valve unit in its closed position;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken in the direction of the arrows 55 of FIGURE 4 and similar to the view of FIGURE 3, showing the valve unit in a closed position; and

FIGURE 6 is a view taken in the direction of the arrow 66 of FIGURE 4 disclosing the handle member and limit means employed therewith for effecting 180 degree rotation of the valve unit from its first or open position to its second or closed position. I

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown in FIG- URE 1 a dry chemical fire extinguishing system or apparatus in accordance with the present invention including a pressurized gas cylinder 10 which may contain nitrogen or some other inert gas under relatively high pressure. The nitrogen is designed to flow into a dry powder tank 11 and the fluidized dry chemical powder contained therein in a conventional manner. Interconnecting the nitrogen cylinder 10 and the powder tank 11 is a gas inlet line 12. The gas inlet line 12 includes in series therewith a shut-oil valve 13 coupled to the nitrogen tank and a reducing valve 14 intermediate the nitrogen cylinder 10 and powder tank 11. Such valves are conventional in form and form no part of the present invention.

In accordance with a feature of the present invention, the gas inlet line 12 connects with a by-pass valve structure 15 which is preferably threaded to the upper part of the dry chemical tank 11. The by-pass valve 15 (which I will be described in some detail as the specification proceeds) has coupled thereto and depending downwardly therefrom, a gas inlet tube 16 and a powder pick-up or discharge tube 17. The by-pass valve 15 connects on its other side with a powder outlet line 18 terminating in a nozzle valve unit 19. Also, the nozzle valve member 19 forms no part of the present invention.

The detailed structure of the by-pass valve 15, coupled gas inlet tube 16, and pick-up powder tube 17, may now be considered in detail by reference to FIGURES 2 through 6 in the drawings.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, wherein the by-pass valve structure 15 is shown in its first or open position, it will be seen that the by-pass valve comprises a manifold 20 having a threaded neck 21 designed to be mechanically coupled in the usual manner to an opening or collar Patented May 17, 1966 i from an open to a closed position by a 180 degree rotation as will become clearer as the specification proceeds.

The shaft 23 integrally includes an axial extension in the form of an arcuate sleeve valve portion 24 and also a sleeve valve 25, both of which are shown in their open position in FIGURES 2 and 3. The valves 24 and 25 as shown, and heretofore mentioned, are formed as part of the rotatable shaft 23.

As shown in the view of FIGURE 6, the shaft 23 is designed to be rotated by the handle 26 between stop pins 27 and 28 protruding slightly from the end of the manifold 20. The handle 26 may be retained in the opening 29, as indicated in FIGURE 2.

In view of the relatively high pressure of the expellant gas or nitrogen, it is desirable to provide some type of sealing means with respect to the valve structures employed. Annular seals 30 and 31 are illustratively shown for this purpose and may co-function with rings 32 and 33. In addition, an O ring 34 may be provided for sealing of the rotatable shaft 23 with respect to the outer part of the manifold 20, for example, as indicated in FIGURE 2. Furthermore, as is shown in FIGURE 3, additional seals 35 and 36 may be provided to co-function with 0 rings 37 and 33.

For purpose of connecting with the gas inlet line 12, there will also be seen from the view of FIGURE 3, that a gas inlet boss 39 is provided to which the inlet gas line may be sealably coupled and through which pressurized gas may flow.

As shown in FIGURE 2, there is provided in the shaft 23 an angled passage 40 which is inoperative in the first or open position of the valve as seen in FIGURES 2 and 3. The passage 40 has an outer end 40a which communicates with the atmosphere by a plug 41 at the upper part of the manifold 20 that may be used for manufacturing purposes.

The manifold 20 has extending downwardly therethrough a gas inlet passage 42 which communicates at one end through a right angular passage 43 in the shaft 23 with the gas inlet boss 39 and in turn the gas inlet line 12.

At its other end, the gas inlet passage 42 communicates with the gas tube 16 which may be welded or otherwise rigidly coupled and sealed with relationship to the valve body or manifold 20 to communicate with the passage 42. The gas tube 16 has an upper gas outlet opening 44. The gas tube 16 extends down towards the bottom of the dry chemical tank 11 (as schematically indicated in FIGURE 1). Near its lower end, the gas tube 16 is provided with a check valve of a sleeve type construction embodying a diaphragm-like member 45 held in place by a clamp 46. The sleeve member 45 extends over a lower gas outlet opening 47 near the bottom of the gas tube 16 which is closed off at 48.

With this type of construction, the nitrogen contained in tank 10, upon opening of the valve 13, will flow through the gas inlet line 12 through the reducing valve 14, and into the by-pass valve 15 through the threaded boss 39, the right angular passage 43, the gas inlet passage 42, and then down through the gas tube 16 to pass out through the upper gas outlet opening 44 and the lower gas outlet opening 47. In passing out through the opening 47, of course, the gas will force expansion of the diaphragm valve 45 which permits only outward flow.

In the open position or first position of the by-pass valve 15 as shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, the expellant nitrogen gas will then force powder within the dry chemical tank 11 into the pick-up or discharge tube 17 which is secured within the manifold 20 and pass through the member 22 communicating with the powder discharge line 18 and into the nozzle valve 19, from which it is expelled to extinguish the fire.

After the fire is extinguished, however, it is desirable to clear the line 18 and at the same time release the pressure in the upper portion of the dry chemical tank 11. Towards this end, the handle 26 is rotated 180 degrees from its position, for example, as shown in FIGURE 6, to

the dotted line position 26'. As the rotation of the handle 26 occurs, the coupled shaft 23 will also rotate and reposition the valve members 24 and 25 formed as an integral part thereof.

In FIGURES 4 and 5, the by-pass valve 15 is shown in its closed position after rotation of the handle 26 to the position 26'. In the closed position, the angled passage 40 has been rotated such that the inner end 40b thereof communicates directly with the gas inlet passage 42. Of

course, at the same time, the right-angled passage 43 has been rotated to a position such that it no longer forms a connection between the gas inlet boss 39 and the gas inlet passage 42. With the angled passage 40 communicating with the gas inlet passage 42 it will be evident that pressurized gas within the upper portion of the powder or dry chemical tank 11 may flow freely into the opening 44 to pass upwardly through the gas tube 16, passage 42, and thereafter outwardly through the angled passage 40 to be exhausted through the opening 40a. Thus, any residual gas pressure within the tank 11 will be exhausted into the atmosphere. It should be noted, in this regard, that the check valve construction 45 prevents any gas or gaspowder mixture from flowing into the lower opening 47 which may be imbedded in the powder contained within the dry chemical tank 11.

It will also be noted that the arcuate sleeve valve 24 is now disposed over the passage 17a communicating with the powder pick-up or discharge tube 17. In consequence, no powder may be discharged through the tube 17 into the line 18.

Also, it will be seen that a right angular bore 49 and manifold 20 connect with a hose clearing passage 50 through a portion 51 of the bore 49. The other portion of the bore 49 is designed for communication with the inlet gas boss 39 and has been brought into proper communication therewith, such that gas may pass through the gas inlet line 12, through the boss 39, the bore 49 and outlet portion 51 thereof into the passage 50 to by-pass the powder tank 11 and clear the powder discharge line 18 as well as the nozzle valve 19.

Thus, as an important feature of the present invention, the movement of the by-pass valve 15 to the closed position performs three functions in that it relieves pressure in the dry chemical tank 11, clears out the powder discharge hose 18, and closes off the powder outlet or pick-up tube 17.

It is believed that the improved valve construction in combination with the components of this particular dry chemical fire extinguisher system results in an apparatus considerably improved over what has been employed in the past in this particular art.

It will be appreciated that certain minor variations and changes may be made in the details of the construction without departing from the basic spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a fire extinguishing apparatus of the type embodying a gas inlet line interconnecting a gas cylinder and powder tank, and including a powder discharge line: valve means interposed in said gas inlet line and rotatable from a first position to a second position, said valve means being coupled to an upper portion of said powder tank; a gas inlet tube communicating between said valve means and the interior of said powder tank; a powder discharge tube communicating between the interior of said powder tank and said valve means; first passage means in said valve means connecting said gas inlet tube to said gas inlet line in said first position of said valve means, and second passage means in said valve means connecting said powder discharge tube to said powder discharge line in said first position; third passage means in said valve means connecting said gas inlet tube to atmosphere upon rotative movement of said valve means to said second position, said valve means in said second position being designed to close off said powder discharge tube; and fourth passage means in said valve means interconnecting said gas inlet line to said powder outlet line so as to bypass said powder tank.

2. -In a fire extinguishing apparatus of the type embodying a gas inlet line interconnecting a gas cylinder and powder tank, and including a powder discharge line: valve means interposed in said line and rotatable from a first position to a second position, said valve means being coupled to the upper portion of said powder tank; a gas inlet tube communicating between said valve means and the interior of said powder tank, said gas inlet tube embodying an upper opening freely communicating with the interior of said tank and a lower opening; check valve means coupled to said lower opening so as to permit gas to only move outwardly therethrough; a powder discharge tube communicating between the interior of said powder tank and said valve means; first passage means in said valve means connecting said gas inlet tube to said inlet gas line in said first position of said valve means, and second passage means in said valve means connecting said powder discharge tube to said powder discharge line in said second position; third passage means connecting said gas inlet tube to atmosphere in said second position of said valve means, and fourth passage means in said valve means connecting said gas inlet line directly to said powder discharge line in said second position of said valve means, said valve means in said closed position being designed to close off the upper end of' said powder discharge tube.

3. The subject matter, according to claim 2, in which handle means are coupled to said valve means for rotating said valve means from said first position to said second position and stop members provided on said valve means for defining the limits of movement of said handle means to an arc of 180 degrees.

4. In a fire extinguishing apparatus of the type embodying a gas inlet line interconnecting a gas cylinder and powder tank, and including a powder discharge line: valve means interposed in said gas inlet line and rotatable from a first position to a second position, said valve means being coupled to an upper portion of said powder tank and including an integral first valve portion and second valve portion; a gas inlet tube communicating between said valve means and the interior of said powder tank; a powder discharge tube communicating between the interior of said powder tank and said valve means; first passage means in said valve means connecting said gas inlet tube to said gas inlet line in said first position of said valve means, and second passage means in said valve means connecting said powder discharge tube to said powder discharge line in said first position; third passage means in said valve means connecting said gas inlet tube to atmosphere upon rotative movement of said valve means to said second position, said first valve portion acting to'close off said gas inlet tube in said second position, and said second valve portion acting to close 011 said powder discharge tube in said second position; and, fourth passage means in said valve means interconnecting said gas inlet line to said powder outlet line in said second position so as to by-pass said powder tank.

5. The subject matter, according to claim 4, in whic said gas inlet tube is provided with a lower opening; and check valve means coupled to said gas inlet tube about said lower opening to permit only outward flow of gas therethrough, whereby no reverse flow of powder may occur through said lower opening upon rotative movement of said valve means to said second position wherein said gas inlet tube communicates with atmosphere.

6. In a'fire extinguishing apparatus of the type embodying a gas inlet line interconnecting a gas cylinder and powder tank, and including a powder discharge line: valve means interposed in said gas inlet line and movable from a first position to a second position, said valve means being coupled to an upper portion of said powder tank; a gas inlet tube communicating between said valve means and the interior of said powder tank; a powder discharge tube communicating between the interior of said powder tank and said valve means; a rotatable shaft embodied in said valve means, said rotatable shaft including first passage means communicating between said gas inlet line and said gas inlet tube and arranged to accommodate the entire flow of gas from the cylinder in said first position of said valve means, and second passage means in said shaft communicating between atmosphere and said gas inlet tube in said second position of said valve means; said valve means further including a first valve portion designed to close off said gas inlet line from said gas inlet tube in said second position of said valve means and a second valve portion designed to close off said powder discharge tube from said powder outlet line in said second position of said valve means.

7. The subject matter, according to claim 6, in which said gas inlet tube is provided with an upper opening nor- .mally above said powder lever and a lower opening normally embedded in the powder; and, check valve means coupled to said gas inlet tube about said lower opening so as to permit outward flow only of gas through said lower opening and thereby prevent movement of powder through said lower opening to atmosphere in said second position of said valve means.

8. The subject matter, according to claim 7, and a handle coupled to said shaft for rotational movement thereof; and limit means connected to said valve means limiting said rotational movement of said handle to an are r of degrees defining at either end thereof said first position and said second position of said valve means.

9. In combination with a pressurized receptacle having an inlet line and an outlet line connected thereto, a rotary plug type valve movable by rotation from a first position to a second position, said valve having a first passage in its first position communicating with said inlet line; an axial extension of said rotary plug; a vent passage in said plug; said axial extension of said plug being designed to close olf said outlet line upon rotative movement to said second position and said vent passage being designed for alignment with said inlet line upon movement to said second position.

10. The combination, according to claim 9, and a blowout passage in said plug designed to connect said inlet line to said outlet line upon movement of said rotary plug to said second position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,049,301 12/1912 Heyman 2-22-397 1,455,069 5/ 19-23 B-luemel 137-212 X 1,640,111 8/1927 Clauson 137625.3-2 2,018,543 10/ 1935 -\Buirk 2 212-4397 X 2,032,095 2/1936 OLeary 222-4007 X 2,208,383 7/1940 Metrick et al. 222-4197 2,378,426 6/ 1945 Meyers 222-397 X 2,580,419 1/1952 Griggs 169-31 2,717,804- 9/1955 White 239-353 X M. HENSON WOOD, JR., Primary Examiner.

EVERETT W. KIR-BY, Examiner.

D. L. MOS'ELEY, V. C. WILKS, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3349788 *Nov 23, 1964Oct 31, 1967Henco Mfg Co IncFluid mixer with valving
US3405601 *Mar 23, 1966Oct 15, 1968Autoquip CorpSingle rotary valve for hydraulic fluid and air
US3407879 *Jun 17, 1966Oct 29, 1968Harrel W. O'rearFire extinguishing system
US3441087 *Nov 15, 1966Apr 29, 1969Poitras Edward JFire extinguisher apparatus
US3459220 *Feb 15, 1966Aug 5, 1969Allied ChemSingle port liquid vapor valve
US3794221 *Dec 6, 1971Feb 26, 1974Inter Polymer Res CorpCartridge for storing, mixing and dispensing a plurality of ingredients
US3844449 *Nov 27, 1970Oct 29, 1974Us ArmyMultiple purpose disperser
US4064944 *Apr 9, 1976Dec 27, 1977Mcclure William FApparatus for fire extinguishing system for floating-roof tanks
US4069873 *Apr 6, 1976Jan 24, 1978Mcclure William FApparatus for fire extinguishing system for floating-roof tanks
US4078614 *Mar 29, 1976Mar 14, 1978Hay George PFire extinguisher
US4298026 *Dec 17, 1979Nov 3, 1981Instrumentation Laboratory Inc.Spool valve
US4534377 *Oct 18, 1983Aug 13, 1985Technique et Esthetique pour l'Industrie et la DistributionDevice for decanting a liquid from a recipient
US4971109 *Sep 27, 1989Nov 20, 1990Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve and arrangement for fire suppression water sprinkler system
US4993453 *Mar 8, 1989Feb 19, 1991Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve and arrangement for fire suppression water sprinkler system
US4995423 *Mar 8, 1989Feb 26, 1991Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve and arrangement for fire suppression water sprinkler system
US5036883 *Oct 3, 1989Aug 6, 1991Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve and arrangement for fire suppression water sprinkler system
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US5269344 *Mar 8, 1990Dec 14, 1993Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Supply valve and arrangement for fire suppression water sprinkler system
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US5588462 *Apr 17, 1995Dec 31, 1996Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve and sensor arrangement
US6186169Aug 19, 1999Feb 13, 2001Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve and arrangement for fire suppression system
US6206034Aug 19, 1999Mar 27, 2001Agf Manufacturing, Inc.Valve with integral flow switch
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Classifications
U.S. Classification169/9, 137/212, 137/625.47, 239/353, 169/77, 239/348, 222/397, 137/625.32, 239/344
International ClassificationF16K11/085, F16K11/02, A62C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C13/006, F16K11/0856
European ClassificationA62C13/00D, F16K11/085R