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Publication numberUS3252287 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1966
Filing dateDec 10, 1962
Priority dateDec 10, 1962
Publication numberUS 3252287 A, US 3252287A, US-A-3252287, US3252287 A, US3252287A
InventorsBunko Suzuki
Original AssigneeBunko Suzuki
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
T-shaped concrete block
US 3252287 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 4, 1966 BUNKO SUZUKI 3,252,287

T-SHAPED CONCRETE BLOCK Filed Dec. 10, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet l I N VE N TOR. Bun r0 JWz/K/ y 1956 1 BUNKO SUZUKI 3,252,287

T-SHAPED CONCRETE BLOCK Filed D60. 10, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet z INVENTOR. 5 0mm Jazuk y 1966 BUNKO SUZUKI 3,252,287

T-SHAPED CONCRETE BLOCK Filed Dec. 10, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR- bumm S'uzuz United States Patent "ice 3,252,287 T-SHAPED CONCRETE BLOCK Bunko Suzuki, 459 Banchi, Yukigaya-cho, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan Filed Dec. 10, 1962, Ser. No. 243,425 Claims. (Cl. 615) This invention relates to a T-shaped concrete block having a great variety of use for public works, e.g. for building a breakwater and barrier structures for debris on the shores,-harbours and rivers and for a barrier for irregular surfaces, groundsill, foundation, river-bed and shore protection, and in one of its aspects the invention relates more particularly to concrete blocks of the above character wherein the T-shaped block has at its central portion a recess which is adapted to couple two blocks to form a hexapodal block. In another aspect, the invention relates to a concrete block of the above character wherein each leglike part of the T-shaped block is provided with an ellipselike opening which is adapted to connect two or more blocks in several forms with a suitable coupling rod or the like coupling member. Further objects and advantages of the invention will be in part obvious and in part specifically referred to in the description hereinafter contained which, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, discloses modifications which are merely illustrative of the principle of the invention in its broader aspects. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side view of one form of the T-shaped concrete block embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a transverse section taken on the line IIII of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the operation of coupling two blocks in the form of a hexapodal block;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the finished coupling of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side view showing another type for connection of the blocks;

FIG. 6 is a plan view showing a still another type of connection;

FIG. 7 shows another adaptation of the blocks;

FIG. 8 shows a manner for joining the hexapodal blocks;

FIG. 9 is a side view of a modified form of the T- shaped block;

FIG. 10 is a transverse section taken on the line X-X of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 11 shows a modified form for coupling two blocks to form a hexapodal block.

As indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2 the T-shaped concrete block of the invention consists of a base part, the cross of the T, (referred in general at 1) which comprises two leg parts 2 and 3 and a third leg part 4 which extends at right angles to the center of the base part 1. The base part 1 has a recess 5 at the side opposite to the extension of the third or central leg 4. The depth of the recess 5 is optional, but it is preferred to have half a length of the width w of the base part 1, as will be further described hereinafter. The length of each leg is also optional, but it is preferred to have the same length, in order to provide multiuse block.

The base part 1 is provided at both of its leg parts 2 and 3 with ellipselike openings 6 and 6', respectively. A similar opening 6" is provided on the third leg 4. Further, the base part 1 is provided at both of its side surfaces with V-shaped grooves 7, 7, which groove extends from the center of base portion of the third leg 4 to the corners of bottom of the recess 5. And also, the same contour of grooves 8, 8 are provided at both the wall surfaces 9, 9 of the recess 5. The groove 8 extends from the central brim of the recess 5 to the corners of bottom thereof, as

shown in FIG. 2.

3,252,287 Patented May 24, 1966 The T-shaped concrete block is thus constructed and provided according to the invention, which is applicable to form easily a hexapodal concrete block as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, especially illustrated in FIG. 3. The first T-shaped block B is stood on its third leg 4 To this first block B ,-a second T-shaped block B is inlaid turning horizontally in such manner that the grooves 7 7 of the second block B face to the grooves 8 8 of the first block B respectively. That is to say, a hexapodal block may be formed by positioning a pair of similar blocks in opposing and transverse positions with the recess of each block receiving the reduced portion (produced by the recess) of the base of the other. When these two blocks are fitted within each other with their recesses 5 and 5 the angle portions 10, 10 of the V-shaped grooves 7, 7 are left opened at the side surfaces of the blocks. Then, the lower openings, i.e. the angle portions 10 10 of the grooves 7 7 of the first block B are closed with a suitable stopper 11, 11, respectively. Thus, liquid concrete, mortar or the like adhesive material may be poured into the upper openings 10 10 of the grooves 7 7 The liquid concrete passes through the groove channel of 7 and 8 then it flows into the groove channels 7 and 8 After setting of the concrete or mortar, the hexapodal block is ready for use. When the coupling of two similar blocks B and B is complete, the leg-like parts 2, 2, 3 and 3 are positioned in the same plane since the depth of each recess 5 is half the width of said legs.

FIG. 5 illustrates the manner in which two or more blocks are connected in parallel with coupling rods 15, 15. It should be noted that each block has ellipselike openings 6 and 6', respectively. So that when the blocks are connected by the coupling rods 15, 15, the rods do not completely fix the position ofthe blocks 'with respect to each other. That is to say, the blocks can adjust to sit well on the ground surface even if it is rough and if the ground has subsided. This connection has an advantage for use on an irregular or curved surface. The third opening 6" of each block serves to control or restrict the water flow.

FIG. 6 illustrates the manner in which many. blocks are laid down on the bottom of the sea, such as for use as a breakwater, river-bed structure, etc. These blocks are connected to one another with concrete piles 16, 16 so as to form layers of the woven T-shaped concrete blocks. The layers of the blocks are piled up from the bottom of the sea to a suitable height above the sea-level. Then the lower layer serves to be the foundation of the breakwater. That is to say, if the breakwater is built up with these blocks, no rubble mound is required. And also, it should be noted that this breakwater has many complex open spaces or interstices in its structure. Therefore, the wave energy is diminished when the water passes through the porous structure. Moreover, the wave energy does not act directly onthe structure, because the structure has many spaces. Conventional breakwaters are apt to be eroded by the wave energy which is directed toward the foot of the breakwater. This is due to the fact that the conventional breakwater consists of a concrete mass, so that the downwardly directed water flow digs out the foot of the structure. In FIG. 6, the arrows show diagrammatically how the water flow, or wave energy is deflected and diminished when it passes through the breakwater of the invention. The uppermost layer of the woven blocks may be paved for the use as a road.

FIG. 7 illustrates the manner in which many blocks are piled up along a precipice. In this adaptation, the third leg 4 of the T-shaped block encroaches on the precipice so as to hold the block itself steady thereat. The recess 5 of the lowermost block may serve as a waterway.

FIG. 8 illustrates a manner for joining two or more 3 hexapodal blocks. A chain 17 or a wire 18 is available to join the blocks with their openings 6, 6 and 6".

In FIGS. 9 and 10 I have shown a somewhat modified form of the invention where-in the elements 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 6", may be understood as being the same as previously described, in construction and mode of operation. It only differs from the first form shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 by the fact that the grooves 7 and 8 of this second form is lodged directly parallel to the base part 1. This second form of construction has some advantage that the manufacturing of such the straight grooves is effected more simple as compared with the former V-shaped groove.

In FIG. 11 I have shown a still another means for producing the joint between two blocks in the form of the hexapodal block. The first block B in this form has a bolt 21, the lower end of which is embedded and fixed to the bottom of the recess 5. The second block B is provided with a hole 22 through which the bolt 21 extends. The tip end portion of the bolt 21 has a screw thread and projects into a side wall of the opening 6". After fitting these two blocks with their recesses, the bolt 21 is fastened with a nut 23, then mortar 24 is applied thereto in order to give watertightness.

I claim:

1. T-shaped concrete blocks comprising a base portion of square cross section comprising the cross of the T and forming first and second legs, a third leg of square cross section forming the staif of the T, said base portion having a rectangular recess extending inwardly from the surface opposite said third leg and being substantially in alignment with said third leg, the breadth of said recess between the first and second legs being substantially equal to a side of the cross section square of said base, the first and second legs measured from the edges of said recess being substantially equal in length to the length of said third leg, the depth of said recess being equal approximately half of the side of said square legs, each of a plurality of said legs having an opening of elliptical cross section therein.

2. A pair of interfitted T-shaped concrete blocks each of said blocks comprising a base portion of square cross section comprising the cross of the T and forming first and second legs, a third leg of square cross section forming the staif of the T, said base portion having a rectangular recess extending inwardly from the surface opposite said third leg and being substantially in alignment with said third leg to provide a reduced portion in the base adjacent said third leg, the breadth of said recess between the first and second legs being substantially equal to a side of the cross sectional square of said base, the first and second legs measured from the edges of said recess being substantially equal in length to the length of said third leg, the depth ofsaid recess being equal to approximately half of said square legs, said pair of blocks being secured together with the third legs thereof extending in opposite directions and the bases being at to each other so that the recess of the first block overlaps said reduced portion of the second block to provide a hexapodal pair of blocks.

3. The pair of interfitted concrete blocks as defined in claim 2, comprising means on a plurality of contacting walls of said pair of blocks to secure the blocks together.

4. The pair of blocks as defined in claim 2, wherein each of a plurality of said legs of said hexapodal pair of blocks contains an opening of elliptical cross section.

5. The pair of blocks as defined in claim 3, wherein the side walls of said recesses and the said walls of the reduced region of said blocks contain matching grooves, a portion of the groove of the reduced region of said blocks extending into a portion of the third leg whereby said grooves may be filled with cementing material after the blocks are fitted together.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 457,371 8/1891 Ross 94-11 X 2,191,924 2/ 1940 Humphrey 614 2,474,786 6/ 1949 Humphrey 614 FOREIGN PATENTS 90,840 7/ 1961 Denmark. 901,389 6/1954 Germany. 30,432 2/1920 Norway.

CHARLES E. OC-ONNELL, Primary Examiner.

JACOB SHAPIRO, EARL J. WITMER, Examiners.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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US3368357 *Nov 3, 1965Feb 13, 1968Masayuki TakamoriStructure for breaking waves
US3516255 *Jul 23, 1968Jun 23, 1970Mitsui Real Estate Co LtdConcrete component or block for a protective covering structure
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Classifications
U.S. Classification405/29, 446/125, 404/41, 446/114, 52/611, 405/33, 273/160, D25/117
International ClassificationE02B3/12, E02D29/02
Cooperative ClassificationE02D29/02, E02B3/129
European ClassificationE02B3/12E, E02D29/02