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Publication numberUS3253354 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1966
Filing dateJul 13, 1964
Priority dateJul 13, 1964
Publication numberUS 3253354 A, US 3253354A, US-A-3253354, US3253354 A, US3253354A
InventorsGollner Stanley G, Zlatan Grsetic
Original AssigneeGollner Stanley G, Zlatan Grsetic
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scientific demonstration device
US 3253354 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 31, 1966 s. G. GOLLNER ETAL 3,253,354

SCIENTIFIC DEMONSTRATION DEVICE Original Filed March 1, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet l l INVENTOR. STANLEY G. GOLLNER 40 ZLATAN GRSE'HC BYFULWIDER, PATTON,

RIEBER, LEE & UTECHT ATTOR NEYS May 31, 1966 s. G. GOLLNER ETAL 3,253,354

SCIENTIFIC DEMONSTRA'I'ION DEVICE Original Filed March l, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR STANLEY G. GOLLNER ZLATAN GRSETIC BY FULWIDER` PATTON` RIEBER, LEE & UTECHT ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,253,354 SCIENTIFIC DEMONSTRATIGN DEVICE Stanley G. Gollner and Zlatan Grsetic, both of 13432 Yosemite Drive, Westminster, tCalif. Continuation of application Ser. No. 262,079, Mar. 1, 1963. This application July 13, 1964, Ser. No. 384,027 7 Claims. (Cl. 35-19) This is a continuation of our patent application Serial No. 262,079, liled March 1, 1963, and now abandoned.

This invention relates to scientific demonstration devices.

It is a major object of the .present invention to provide a new and novel device which affords a means for demonstrating various scientific phenomena.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of the aforedescribed nature utilizing a plurality of buoyant balls which are drawn downwardly through a tube immersed in water to be released at the lower end of the tu-be and thereafter rise towards the surface of the water, with the balls serving to effect movement of an endless belt that is wrapped around a pair of vertically aligned upper and lower pulleys whereby such belt will in turn effect rotation of these pulleys.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the aforedescribed nature that incorporates unique means for directing the balls from the lower portion of the tube in properly timed relationship into cups mounted on the endless belt.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the aforedescribed nature which is foolproof in operation and sturdy of construction.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a device of the aforedescribed nature which maybe constructed at comparatively low cost.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will lbecome apparent from the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the appended drawings wherein:

FIGURE l is a side view taken partly in vertical section showing a preferred form of scientific demonstration device embodying the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a front view of said device taken along line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a vertical sectional view in enlarged scale taken along line 3-3 -of FIGURE l; and

FIGUR-E 4 is a ver-tical sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIGURE 1.

Referring to the drawings, the preferred form of scientiiic demonstration device embodying the present invention is shown with its major parts disposed within a tank T that contains a body of water 10. Arranged within the tank are a plurality of like buoyant balls 12. These balls are adapted to move downwardly through a tube generally designated 14, as indicated by the directional arrow in FIGURE l. The balls 12 have an outer diameter slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the tube 14 whereby such balls have a close yet friction-free sliding contact with the tube walls.

Also disposed within the tank T are a pair of upper and lower pulleys 16 and 18, respectively. The pulleys 16 FIGURE 1 by means of a tension spring 75 interposed and 18 are respectively carried by horizontal Shafts 20 and Patented May 31, 1966 Downward circulation of water through the tube 14 from the upper portion of the lower portion thereof is effected by means of a conventional centrifugal pump 32 that is arranged at the lower left-hand side of the tank T, as indicated in FIGURE 1. A suction pipe 34 connects the intake of the pump 32 with the lower portion of the tube 14 by means of a plurality of apertures 36 formed in the lower portion of the tube 14. The discharge from the centrifugal pump 32 is connected with the lower portion of the tank T by means of a pipe 3S that empties into the lower portion of the tank T. The pump 32 may be driven by means of a conventional electric motor 40 through a belt 42.

The lower portion of the tube 14 is provided with an exit stack 42 that extends upwardly, with its upper end being open. A screen 44 is disposed in the lower portion of the tube to direct the balls 12 into the lower portion of the stack 42. The balls are directed from the upper end of the stack 42 into a plurality of sockets 46 formed in a transfer disc 48. The transfer disc 48 is rotatably disposed within a generally annular housing 50 that is fixed relative to the tank T. The transfer disc 48 is keyed to a horizontal shaft 49 supported by bearings 50 that are fixed relative to the tank T, as indicated in FIGURE 2. The shaft 49 is also keyed to a drive pulley 52. The drive pulley 52 receives an endless belt 54 which extends around the lower pulley 18. Preferably, the connection between the drive pulley 52 and the endless belt 54 permits slippage therebetween.

The upper portion of the transfer disc casing 50 is provided with a guide 56 that is directed upwardly towards the left-hand lower portion of the lower pulley 18. The guide 56 is so arranged as to direct balls 12 from the transfer disc sockets 46 to the individual cups 30.

The midportion of the transfer disc 48 extends through the casing 50 and is provided with a plurality of laterally extending timing pins 68. The lower pulley 18 is also provided with a plurality of timing pins 62 which are veritically aligned with the pins 6i). The timing pins 60 and (S2 are evenly circumferentially spaced relative to the transfer disc 48 and the lower pulley 18.

The timing pins 60 and 62 are successively engaged by the upper and lower legs 64 and 66, respectively, of a generally V-spaced timer member, generally designated 68; The midportion of the timer member 68 is supported by a horizontal pivot pin 70 that is carried by the upper end of a vertical support arm 72, with the latter having its lower end affixed to the base 74 of the tank T, as indicated particularly in FIGURE 2. The timer member 68 is constantly biased towards its solid outline position of between the upper end of the post 72 and the upper leg 66.

Referring particularly to FIGURES 3 and 4, the cup elements 30 are each defined by a pair of curved FIG- URES 30a and 30h that are preferably arranged to maintain the balls 12 positioned on the centerline of the belt 28. The belt 28 is formed with apertures 70 having a width greater than the diameter of the balls 12 lbelow each of the cup elements 30. With this arrangement, the buoyancy of the balls 12 will not tend to cant the belt 2S out of a lineally extending disposition. As will also be apparent from FIGURES 3 and 4, the rims 72 and 74, respectively, of the upper and lower pulleys 16 and 18 are generally semicircular in configuration, with the opposite ends of the rims being rigidly secured to a pair of belt-guiding flanges 76. Referring particularly to FIGURE 4, the left-hand side of the lower pulley 18 is provided with a circumferentially grooved ring 78 that receives the belt 54.

`In the operation of the aforedescribed device, the centrifugal pump 32 is actuated so as to draw water downwardly from the upper portion of the tube 14 to the lower portion thereof, with the discharge from the pump entering the lower portion of the tank T through the pipe 38. Such downward circulation of water through the tube 14 will serve to draw the balls 12 downwardly through such tube. The balls will pass from the lower portion of the tube upwardly through the stack 42 because of the buoyancy of such balls. As the uppermost ball in the stack 42 reaches the upper end of the stack it will pass into one of the sockets 46 formed in the transfer disc 48.

The transfer disc 48 is constantly urged in a clockwise direction under the influence of the belt 54 in a manner to be described hereinafte-r. Accordingly each ball from the upper end of the stack 42 will be carried in a clockwise direction by the transfer disc into the lower end of the guide 56. When a ball-containing socket 46 is aligned with the lowe-r end of the guide 56 the ball 12 will rise upwardly within the guide because of the buoyancy of the ball. As the ball leaves the upper end of the guide 56 it will enter one of the downwardly-facing cup elements 30. The buoyancy of the ball will then serve to cause it to rise towards the surface of the body of water 10. Such upward movement of the balls -12 will se-rve to effect upward lineal movement of the left-hand side of the belt 28, as indicated by the directional arrow in FIGURE 1. vAs any individual ball 12 approaches the top dead-center of the upper pulley 16 it will be released from its cup element 30 by means of a bifurcated release element 80 secured to the upper end of the tube 14, as indicated in FIGURE 1. Preferably, the upper portion of the tube 14 is provided with a downwardly flared entrance 82 to receive the balls 12. As the balls enter the upper portion f the tube 14 they will again be drawn downwardly therethrough under the influence of the circulation created by the centrifugal pump 32. The continued circulation of the balls 12 through the tube 14 and thence upwardly to the surface of the body of water by means of the transfer disc 48 and beltmounted cups 30 will serve to effect continuous rotation of the upper and lower pulleys 16 and 18. The transfer disc 48 tends to rotate continually in a clockwise direction under the influence of the belt 54. As noted hereinbefore, however, slippage is permitted to take place between the belt 54 and the drive pulley 52 of the transfer disc 48. This permits the transfer disc 48 to be held momentarily stationary relative to its casing 50 so as to receive balls 12 from the upper end of the stack 42.

The tnansfer disc 48 is temporarily held against rotation by means of the timer member 68. Thus, the lower leg 64 of the timer member is provided with a short hook 64a that successively engages the timing pins 60 of the transfer disc in the manner indicated in FIGURE 1 to stop rotation of the transfer disc long enough to permit the uppermost ball in the stack 42 to enter a transfer disc socket 46 disposed immediately thereabove. In this regard, it will be noted that the sockets 46 are radially aligned with the timer pins 60. As the lower pulley 18 continues to rotate in a clockwise direction, the upper leg 66 of the timer member 68 will be cammed downwardly by a timing pin 64 on the lower pulley 18 towards the dotted line position indicated in FIGURE l so as to gradually depress the hook 64a until it clears the timing pin 60 with which it is initially engaged. The transfer disc 48 is then free to rotate through 90 degrees in a clockwise direction under the influence of the belt 54. By this time the timer member 68 will have been returned by spring 75 to its original solid outline position of FIGURE 1 whereby the hook 64a will engage the timer pin 60 that was initially disposed to the right of the first-engaged timer pin on the transfer disc. In this manner the transfer disc 48 will again be held momentarily stationary to receive the next ball 12 from the upper end of the stack 42.

The aforedescribed device is useful in demonstrating scientific phenomena that effect movement of the balls 12 through the water 10. So long as the centrifugal pump 32 is actuated the upper and lower pulleys 16 and 18 will continue to rotate. Referring to FIGURE 2, if desired, a power take-off pulley may be keyed to the shaft 22 that supports the lower pulley 18. Similarly, a driving pulley could be keyed to the upper shaft 20 if desired.

Various modifications and changes may be made with respect to the foregoing description without departing from the spirit of the present invention or the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. A scientific demonstration device for use with a body of water, comprising:

a plurality of buoyant balls;

a tube extending from the upper portion of said body of water to the lower portion thereof, with said balls having an outer diameter slightly -smaller than the inner diameter of said tube;

a pair of vertically aligned upper and lower pulleys mounted for rotation in said body of water;

an endless belt supported by said pulleys;

a plurality of cups spaced about the length of said belt to receive said balls from the lower end of said tube and release said balls into the upper end of said tube;

power-operated means for lowering the water pressure in the lower portion of said tube whereby said balls will be drawn downwardly through said tube from the upper portion thereof; and

means interposed between the lower portion of said tube and the lower portion of said belt and operatively connected to one of said pulleys to direct balls from the lower portion of said tube into -said cups in timed relationship whereby said balls effect rotation of said pulleys as said balls oat towards the surface of said body of water.

2. A scientific demonstration device, comprising:

a body of water;

a plurality of buoyant balls;

a tube extending from the upper portion of said body of water to the lower portion thereof, with said balls having an outer diameter slightly smaller than the inner diameter of said tube;

a pair of vertically aligned upper and lower pulleys mounted for rotation in said body of water;

an endless belt supported by said pulleys;

a plurality of cups spaced about the length of said belt to receive said balls from the lower end of said tube and release said balls into the upper end of said tube;

a power-operated pump having an intake connected with the lower portion of said tube and the discharge of said pump emptying into said body of water whereby said balls will be drawn downwardly through said tube from the upper portion thereof; and

means interposed between the lower portion of said tube and the lower portion of said belt and operatively connected to one of said pulleys to direct balls from the lower portion of said tube into said cups in timed relationship whereby said balls effect rotation of said pulleys as said balls float towards the surface of said body of water.

3. A scientific demonstration device, comprising:

a body of water;

a plurality of buoyant balls;

a tube extending from the upper portion of said body of water to the lower portion thereof, with said balls having an outer diameter slightly smaller than the inner diameter of said tube;

a pair of vertically aligned upper and lower pulleys mounted for rotation in said body of water;

an endless belt supported by said pulleys;

a plurality of cups spaced about the length of said belt to receive said balls from the lower end of said tube and release said balls into the upper end of said tube;

power-operated means for lowering the water pressure in the lower portion of said tube whereby said balls will be drawn downwardly through said tube from the upper portion thereof; and

transfer means interposed between the lower portion of said tube and the lower portion of said belt to direct balls from the lower portion of said tube into said cups in timed relationship whereby said balls effect rotation of said pulleys as said balls float towards the surface of said body of water, said transfer means including a transfer disc that receives said balls from the lower portion of said tube and moves them upwardly into a guide aligned with said cups and a timer member disposed between one of said pulleys and said transfer disc to coordinate the rotation of said wheels and said disc.

4. A device as set forth in claim 3 wherein said transfer disc is driven by said lower pulley by a belt that permits slippage between said belt and said transfer disc.

5. A scientific demonstration device, comprising:

a body of water;

a plurality of buoyant balls;

a tube extending from the upper portion of said body of water to the lower portion thereof, with said balls having an outer diameter slightly smaller than the inner diameter of said tube;

a pair of vertically aligned upper and lower pulleys mounted for 4rotation in said body of water;

an endless belt supported by said pulleys;

a plurality of cups spaced about the length of said belt to receive said balls from the lower end of said tube and release said balls into the upper end of said tube;

a power-operated pump having an intake connected with the lower portion of said tube and the discharge of said pump emptying into said body of water whereby said balls will be drawn downwardly through said tube from the upper portion thereof; and

transfer means interposed between the lower portion of said tube and the lower portion of said belt to direct balls from the lower portion of said tube into said cups in timed relationship whereby said balls effect rotation of said pulleys as said balls float towards the surface of 'said body of water, said transfer disc is driven by said lower pulley by a belt that permits slippage between said belt and said transfer disc.

7. A power-producing device for use with a body of water, comprising:

a plurality of buoyant balls;

a tube extending from the upper portion of said body of water to the lower portion thereof, with said balls having an outer diameter slightly smaller than the inner diameter of said tube;

a pair of vertically aligned upper and lower pulleys mounted for rotation in said body of water;

an endless belt supported by said pulleys;

a plurality of cups spaced about the length of said belt to receive said balls from the lower end of said tube and release said balls into the upper end'of said tube;

power-operated means for lowering the water pressure in the lower portion of said tube whereby said balls will be drawn downwardly through said tube from the upper portion thereof;

means interposed between the lower portion of said tube and the lower portion of said belt and operatively connected to one of said pulleys to direct balls from the lower portion of said tube into said cups in timed relationship whereby said balls effect rotation of said pulleys as said balls float towards the surface of said body of water;

and power take-off means driven by one of said pulleys.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,181,657 5/1916 Fox 46-41 1,408,412 2/ 1922 Sliworsky et al. 46-42 1,550,619 8/1925 Kingsley 46-41 3,106,394 10/1963 Gelbart 273-140 X FOREIGN PATENTS 58,145 8/ 1891 Germany. 263,836 9/1913 Germany.

EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner.

JEROME SCHNALL, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1181657 *Mar 24, 1916May 2, 1916John H FoxToy.
US1408412 *Mar 31, 1921Feb 28, 1922Adam SliworskyToy power machine
US1550619 *May 25, 1923Aug 18, 1925Kingsley Harold TMechanical toy water mill
US3106394 *May 26, 1961Oct 8, 1963Gelbart DavidFishing game
*DE58145C Title not available
*DE263836C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4301613 *Jul 21, 1980Nov 24, 1981Kooistra Sr William JMarble actuated toy
US4586280 *Feb 25, 1985May 6, 1986Brian DaneNovelty advertising cap
US4923429 *Aug 7, 1989May 8, 1990Lewco Corp.Bubble-propelled amusement device
US4990118 *Apr 28, 1989Feb 5, 1991Sente Creations Co., Ltd.Toy utilizing bubbles in liquid
US5017171 *Aug 3, 1990May 21, 1991Sente Creations Co., Ltd.Toy utilizing bubbles in liquid
US5049080 *Jul 19, 1990Sep 17, 1991Kriebel And Holsapple, Inc.Waterwheel demonstrating apparatus
US5167560 *Jan 8, 1992Dec 1, 1992Bernie LubinieckiToy fire fighting display
US5988441 *Oct 11, 1996Nov 23, 1999The Coca-Cola CompanyFluid merchandiser for beverage dispenser
US8147249 *May 20, 2010Apr 3, 2012Neda AlaneziDisplay mechanism illustrating fluid dynamics
US20110287399 *May 20, 2010Nov 24, 2011Neda AlaneziDisplay Mechanism Illustrating Fluid Dynamics
US20120074703 *Sep 23, 2010Mar 29, 2012Chen-Chang LinCirculating electric generator
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/300, 446/166, 446/267, 446/153, 446/176
International ClassificationG09B23/00, G09B23/12
Cooperative ClassificationG09B23/12
European ClassificationG09B23/12