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Publication numberUS3253655 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1966
Filing dateNov 14, 1963
Priority dateNov 14, 1963
Publication numberUS 3253655 A, US 3253655A, US-A-3253655, US3253655 A, US3253655A
InventorsBrown Cicero C
Original AssigneeBrown Oil Tools
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liner setting and crossover cementing tool for wells
US 3253655 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. C. BROWN May 31, 1966 LINER SETTING AND CROSSOVER CEMENTING TOOL FOR WELLS Filed NOV. 14, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet l May 31, 1966 c. c. BROWN 3,253,655

LINER SETTING AND CROSSOVER CEMENTING TOOL FOR WELLS Filed Nov. 14, 1963 4 Smeets-Shed'l 2 C. C. BROWN May 31, 1966 LINER SETTING AND CROSSOVER CEMENTING TOOL FOR WELLS Filed NOV. 14, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

A/P/VEY C. C. BROWN C/ce/o C Brow/7 lili LINER SETTING AND CROSSOVER CEMENTING TOOL FOR WELLS l'. li

May 31, 1966 Filed Nov. 14, 1965 United States Patent O 3,253,655 LINER SETTING AND CROSSVER CEMENTING TOL FOR WELLS Cicero C. Brown, Brown Oil Tools inc., R0. Box 19236, Houston, Tex. Filed Nov. 14, i963, Ser. No. 323,790 8 Claims. (Cl. 166-120) This invention is directed to well tools and more particularly to a liner setting and crossover cementing tool.

For safe completion of a well, such as an oil or gas well, it is generally necessary to cement strings of well casing, commonly called liners through various sections of the well bore, including the producing horizons, to effectively seal-oif the annular space between the liners and the wall of the well bore. Ordinarily, the upper end of the the liner will be anchored inside the lower end of a larger diameter, previously installed casing. In such operations, it is essential that the cement, when set, forms a perfect pressure-tight seal betwen the liner and rthe well bore wall. However, it is not uncommon that the cement will not flow uniformly about the exterior of the liner, leaving voids through which pressure fluids can rise t `the surface uncontrolled. Such defective cementing jobs may result from one or more of several condition arises from the conventional method of cementing the liner wherein the cement is pumped down the inside of the liner (in a measured quantity of suicient volume), out of the bottom of the liner, and back up around its exterior through the annular space between the liner and the well bore wall. When the cement is being thus pumped into the important area between the liner and well bore wall, the upward movement of the cement is opposed by gravity which tends to slow its movement and causes the cement to seek paths of least resistance. As a result, the cement will sometimes form channels which spiral upwardly around the liner, leaving voids in the body of the cement. This type of channeling usually occurs along the upper levels of the liner, the cement being usually well distributed about lthe liner adjacent the lower end thereof.

Another common condition resulting in defective cementing is the presence along the bore hole of a low pressure earth zone or thief sand. When such a low pressure zone is encountered in the drilling of a well, the zone Will often take the drilling mud due to the greater hydrostatic head of the drilling mud. IOrdinarily, the weight of the drilling mud is made greater than the average normal pressure gradient of the earth and this difference may be further increased if higher pressure zones are encountered in order to prevent blowouts. The resulting relatively high hydrostatic head of the drilling mud will cause the latter to be forced into such low-pressure zones. In order to prevent this occurrence, starch, cellulosic and other suitable materials are added to the mud to plug the low-pressure zones and form a cake on the wall of the well bore intersecting the earth formations.

However, before a liner can be cemented in the well bore, the wall cake must be scratched oft in order that the cement may adhere directly to the wall of the well bore. Since the weight of the cementing lluids must be as high as that of the drilling muds in order to prevent blowouts, the low-pressure zone now exposed will take the cement and when circulation is stopped to allow the cement to set, part of the cement will drain into the low-pressure zone, leaving a channeled and generally defective cement seal between the liner and the bore wall.

To oset the difficulties such as those noted above in cementing liners, I have heretofore disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 307,659, filed Septem- 3,253,655 Patented May 31, 1966 ice ber 9, 1963, an improved method and apparatus by means of which cementing is effected by what has been termed down-flow cementing, in which the cementlng fluids are circulated from the inner cementing or operating string through a crossover head into the annular space between the liner and the well bore to flow downwardly through the annular space from a point adjacent the upper end of the liner and thence upwardly through the bore of the liner, from which it is by-passed around the down-flowing stream of cement-to the exterior of the liner above the crossover head. An expansible packer, or other seal, is provided between the liner and the Well bore wall between the points of entrance and exit of the cement. In addition, the previously described method employs means to seal-off the interior of the liner and in conjunction with the packer between the liner and the well bore, serves to relieve the body of cement from the pressures of overlying columns of fluid, both in the annulus and in the interior of the liner.

IThe aforementioned application discloses both the method and one embodiment of liner setting and cementing tool suitable for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

The present invention is directed to an improved apparatus embodiment for accomplishing the same primary result, namely, down-How or crossover cementing and sealing-olir the body of cement from the pressure of superimposed iluid columns Accordingly, it is a primary object of this invention to provide an improved cementing apapratus for obviating the diflculties such as previously enumerated, which are encountered in cementing liners in well bores.

An important object is to provide an apparatus for effecting down-flow cementing and sealing-off of the annular space between the liner and the well bore and of the bore of the liner above the cement.

An additional object is the provision of an apparatus including a retrievable liner-setting and cementing tool having a crossover head incorporated therein, by means of which cementing iluids are directed to the annular space between the liner and the well bore wall at a point adjacent the upper end of the liner and the return iiow of cementing iuids moving upwardly through the liner is by-passed around the down-flowing stream to the annular space above the liner.

Still another object is the provision of a liner cementing apparatus which includes closure elements for closing off the bore of the liner against pressure in both directions.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a liner setting and cementing tool of the character described which includes a liner hanger and packer assemblage for anchoring the liner to the surrounding casing and for sealing olf the annular space between the liner and the surrounding well casing at a point adjacent the upperend of the liner.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus of the general character described in which the running-in mandrel and crossover head may be retrieved for reuse.

Other and more specic objects and advantages of this invention will become more readily apparent from the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing which illustrates a useful embodiment in accordance with this invention.

In the drawing:

FIGS. 1A and 1B, together, constitute a longitudinal sectional view of the tool in accordance with this invention, the parts being shown in the positions occupied when the device is being run into a well bore;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 2 2 0f FG. l;

' sure cylinder.

FIGS 3A and 3B, together, constitute a longitudinal quarter-sectional View of the tool, showing the parts in the positions occupied upon completion of introduction of cement.

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal quarter-sectional view of the upper' end portion of the tool, showing the mandrel released from the liner; and

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 are fragmentary, longitudinal quartersectional views showing the positions of the parts at successive stages in the `operation of the tool.

Referring to the drawing, the tool is shown inserted in a casing C already in place in a well bore, and to which smaller diameter pipe string, commonly called a liner is tobe connected and cemented in place in the well bore through which the liner extends. The tool includes a tubular liner extension or setting sleeve, designated generally by the letter S, and consisting of an upper section 10 threadedly connected to a lower section 11. The latter is provided at an intermediate point thereof with radial ports 12 and upper section 10 is provided at an intermediate point thereof with a plurality of radially extending ports 13. The lower end of lower section 11 of the setting sleeve is provided with a threaded pin 14 received in one end of an adapter sub 15, the lower end of which has a threaded pin 16 for connecting the setting sleeve to a liner L. A liner hanger and seal assembly, designated generally by the letter H, is mounted on the exterior of lower section 11 of the'setting sleeve. The assembly includes a tubular slip cage 17 slidably disposed about the exterior of section 11, generally opposite ports 12. The lower end of cage 17 is initially releasably jsecured by means of shear pins 18 to section 11 below ports 12. The upper end of cage 17 is provided internally to rest on an external shoulder 20 provided on the exterior of section 11 just above ports 12 to limit downward movement of the slip cage relative to the setting sleeve. Seal packing 21-21, such -as conventional O-rings, are mounted above and below ports 12 between the slip cage and the exterior of section 11. One of the seals 21 is mounted in the reduced diameter portion of cage 17, thereby creating an area dilference and dening a pres- A series of conventional wedge pipegripping slips 22 mounted on the resilient arms 23 are supported by the latter from the upper end of slip cage 17. The slips are disposed about a downwardly and inwardly tapering slip expander cone 24 slidably mounted on the exterior of sleeve section 11 above the slips and initially secured to the sleeve section by means of the shear pins 25. As noted, cage 17 and seal packings 21-21 define `a pressure cylinder, which, in its initial position serves as a sleeve valve or cover for ports 12, and is adapted to be moved to the port-opening position by a combination of pressure uid transmitted into the interior of the cage between the seal packings from ports 12 which moves slips 22 to the pipe-gripping position and then by a subsequent downward movement of the tubing string. An annular expansible packing element 26, constructed of rubber-like material, .is disposed about the exterior of sleeve section 11 with its lower end in abutting engagement with slip cone 24 and having its upper end secured to an end compression ring 27 disposed about the exterior of sleeve section 11. The threaded connection between lower setting sleeve section 11 and upper `sleeve section 10 defines a downwardly facing shoulder 28 formed by the lower end of upper sleeve section 10 and, as will appear subsequently, shoulder 28 will abut end ring 27 to apply axial compression to seal packer 26 in sealing o the annular space A between the exterior of lower section sleeve 11 and the wall `of casing C.

A tubular mandrel or setting tool, designated generally by the letter M, is insertable into the bore of the setting sleeve and comprises an upper connector section 30 and a coaxial elongate lower section 31 which is rotatably inserted into the lower end of connector section 30 and Y wardly facing shoulder 33 spaced below the lower end of in the setting sleeve.

coupling 32 and a bearing collar 34 is mounted about section 30 between shoulder 33 and the lower end of coupling 32. Antifriction bearings, such as roller bearings 35, are mounted between bearing collar 34 and the lower end of the coupling 32. Bearing collar 34 has a 'diameter such as to enable it to extend over the upper end of upper setting sleeve section 10 and to rest thereon. By means of the arrangement, including bearing collar 34 rotatably supported on mandrel section 3l), it will be seen that rotations of tubing T will rotate upper section 30 of mandrel M relative to lower section 31 and the setting sleeve. A connector nut 36 having external coarse'threads 37, is splined at 36a to the exterior of mandrel section 30. Threads 37 are adapted to engage threads'38 formed on the interior of setting sleeve section 10 at a point above upper ports 13. Threads 38 run out into a smooth cylindrical surface 39 which ex` tends to the upper end of setting sleeve section 10. The spline connection between nut 36 and mandrel section 30 will constrain the nut to rise as the mandrel is rotated relative to the setting sleeve and will thereby be operable to release the mandrel from the setting sleeve when nut 36 has cleared threads `38, as will appear in FIG. 4. Secured to the lower end of mandrel section 31 is a crossover head, designated generally by the letter X, which includes a tubular body 40 coaxial with the mander section and threadedly secured thereto at 41. The lower end of body 40 is threadedly connected at 42into the internally threaded upper end of a tubular body extension 53 coaxial with body 40 and mandrel section 31. Intermediate its ends, body 40 is provided with laterally extending branch nipples 43 dening lateral passages 44 which are disposed in registration with lower ports 12 A tubular shell 45 concentrically surrounds crossover body. 40 and is secured to the ends of branch nipples 43 closely adjacent the inner wall of setting sleeve section 11. Shell 45 has openings 46 registering with passage 44 and ports 12, so as to form therewith continuous passages providing'communication between the interior of the mandrel, via body 40, and the annular space A between the setting sleeve and casing C when ports 12 are open. Shell 45 is securely welded to' -the ends of branch nipples 43 to thereby form a unitary structure with the crossover head. Seal packing 47-47 is mounted between the exterior of shell 45 and the inner wall of setting sleeve section 11 at points above and below openings 46. A snap ring gr-oove 48 is provided in the bore wall of setting sleeve section 11 at a point just above the upper end of shell 45, for purposes to appear subsequently. An elongate sleeve valve 50 is initially secured to the lower end of shell 45 by means of shear pins in close sliding engagement with the bore wall of lower setting sleeve section 11, and initially will be positioned below ports 12. As will appear subsequently, sleeve valve 50 is adapted to be shifted to a position opposite ports 12 to close communication between the interior of the setting sleeve and annular space A. A snap ring 79 is mounted in the exterior -of sleeve valve 50 near its upper end to be received in snap ring groove 48 to lock the sleeve valve in the port-closing position as will appear hereinafter. Longitudinally spaced seal packings 51-51 are mounted in the exterior of sleeve valve 50 to be positioned above and below ports 12 when the sleeve valve has been shifted to the closed position.v

tional `fonm well known in the cementing art.

A tubular plug extension member 55 is slidably disposed in the bore of body extension 53 and when fully inserted therein, as seen in FIG. 1B, abuts the lower end of body 4U. For the purposes of this description, crossover body 40, body extension 53 and plug extension member 55 are all treated as portions of` mandrel M. The exterior of the upper portion of plug extension 55 is reduced slightly in diameter to define near the upper end thereof the downwardly facing shoulder 56. An abutment ring 57 is seated in the inner wall of the lower end of body extension 53 to define the upwardly facing shoulder 58 adapted, during the course of operation of the device for purposes appearing herinafter, to abut shoulder 56. A seal ring 59 is mounted in the exterior of the upper end of plug extension 5S to seal with the bore wall of body extension 53. The lower end of body extension 53 is threadedly received in the upper end of a collar 60 which surrounds an enlarged diameter portion 61 of the plug extension member. Portion 61 is provided with lateral upper circulation ports 62 communicating with the bore of the plug extension and are sealed-off by upper and lower seal rings 63-63 disposed between the collar 60 and the exterior of the plug extension above and below ports 62. Collar 60 thus forms a sleeve valve controlling circulation ports 62. Shear pins 64 initially secure collar 60 to plug extension 55 at a point below ports 62 in the closed position over ports 62. A downwardly facing shoulder 55a is provided on the exterior of extension S5 below ports 62 for purposes to appear hereinafter. Plug extension 55 extends downwardly below collar 60 through the interior of the setting sleeve into the upper end of liner L, passing through a closure ring 65 threadedly mounted in the bore of sub 15. Closure ring 65 has an axial opening 66 to slidably receive plug extension 5S and a seal packing 67 is mounted in opening 66 to seal about the exterior of plug extension 55. A snap ring groove 68 is provided in the wall of bore 66 below seal packing 67. Lower circulation ports 69 are provided through the wall of plug extension 55, near the lower end thereof, and a tubular cap 70 is initially secured in the lower end of plug extension 55 by means of shear pins 71. The lower end of cap 70 is closed by a wall 72 and the cap is provided with a resilient snap ring 73 in its exterior a short distance above wall 72 and is adapted to be received in snap ring groove 68 during operation of the tool as will appear hereinafter. Potts 74 are provided through the side wall of cap 70 at a point above snap ring 73. The upper portion of plug extension 55 is provided with upper and lower longitudinally spaced plug seats 75 and 76, respectively, for receiving closure plugs during the course of cernenting, as will be described hereinafter, upper plug seat 75 being made larger in diameter than lower plug seat 76 to allow passage of a smaller diameter plug through upper seat 75.

Gperation of the device is as follows: The tool, with the parts in the positions illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 1B and secured to the liner L, will be run through casing C to the point at which it is desired to set the liner and cement it in place. It will be noted that with the parts in the positions illustrated in FIGS. lA and 1B, fluid being displaced in the well will be free to ow Iupwardly through annular space A, as well as through the liner L, and :lower circulation ports 69 to the interior of the operating string and thence to the surface. Ports 12 will be closed by slip cage 17 and upper circulation ports 62 will be closed by collar dll.

Circulation of cementin g fluids will now be begun, being usually preceded by mud or other fluid which is separated 4from the body of cement by a first closure plug P1, shown .in broken lines in FIG. 1B, of a generally conven- As the pre-cementing fluids flow downwardly ahead of the body of cement, they will ow through the interior of the mandrel and its plug extension thence out through lower d circulation ports 69 into the interior of the liner, and thence out of the bottom of the liner up through annular space A back to the surface. When plug P1, which immediately precedes the cement, seats on lower seat 76, pressure may be applied to the body of cement by pumps at the surface. This pressure acting on plug P1 will break shearwpins 64, forcing plug extension 55 downwardly relative to body extension 53 until shoulder 55a engages closure ring 65 (FIG. 3B). This will rnc-ve upper circulation port 62 below seals 63, thereby communicating the interior of the mandrel extension with the annular space between the setting sleeve and the mandrel above closure ring 65. This position is shown in FIG. 3B. With the bore of the mandrel thus closed by plug P1, the hydraulic pressure exerted by the cement by virtue of the pumps at the surface, will act through passages 44, openings 46, and ports 12 on shoulderA 19 in the slip cage. As the 'pressure-active area, represented by shoulder 19, is greater than any other section of the slip cage, the resulting unbalance in pressure will act upwardly on shoulder 19 wit-h sufficient force to break shear pins 1S (FIG. 3B) and move slip cage 17 with its supported slips 22 upwardly over expander cone 24 until slips 22 grippingly engage the wall of casing C (FIG. 3A). When this occurs, the operating string can be lowered and since the cone is held by the set slips, the downward movement will apply pressure sufficient to break shear pins 25, allowing the string to move downwardly until shoulder 28 engages end ring 27 on the seal packer, axially compressing and expanding the latter to form a fluid-tight seal between setting sleeve 11 and casing C, thereby sealing off annular space A adjacent the upper end of the liner while opening ports 12. With ports 12 thus opened, the cement will now be forced through passage-s 44, openings 46, and ports 12 into annular space A and will be then caused to flow downwardly from about the upper end of the liner to its lower end, and thence upwardly through the bore of the liner. Near t-he upper end of the liner, the cement-ing fluids preceding and being displaced by the cement will flow through lower circulation ports 69 into the bore of plug extension 55 and thence out through upper circulation ports 62 into the annular space ibetween the Amandrel and the setting sleeve. This flow will continue :upwardly through the annular space between sleeve valve 50 and the exterior of body extension 53 and will bypass around the down-flowing streams flowing through passages 44 from the interior of crossover body 49, and will then flow upwardly through the annular space between the mandrel and the setting sleeve and out through ports 13 into the annular space above the set seal 26. The positions of the parts during the cementing operation are shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B. The body of the cement will be followed by a second plug P2, slightly larger in diameter than plug P1, and which is adapted to seat on upper seat 75. Plug P2 is also of a generally conventional form having a length suficient to span passages 44 and seal off the :bore of the lcrossover body above passages 44, as appears in FIG. 3B. Seating of this plug and sealing off crossover ,passages 44 will be indicated to the operator at the surface by the rise in pressure of the cement circulating pumps and will thus indicate that the placing of the cement has been completed.

The operating string will -next be rotated to the right to release connector nut 36 (FIG. 4) and thereby allow the mandrel, with its attached elements, to be drawn upwardly. The latter include crossover head 4l), shell 45, body extension 53, and sleeve valve 5l). These parts will move upwardly until shoulder ring 57 carried by the lower end of body extension 53 strikes shoulder 56 (FIG. 5). At this point, sleeve valve 50 will have been shifted to the position closing ports 12 and cutting off communication between the interior of the mandrel and annular space A. Snap ring 79 will latch into groove 48, loc-king the sleeve-Valve in the closed position. At this stage, with extension sleeve 55 resting on ring 65, and with the ports 12 closed, the u1pward movement of the operating string relative to plug extension 55 has moved ports 44 above the upper end of plug P2 and also the upper seal 47 on shell 45 has moved adjacent a oounterbore in setting sleeve 11 so that icinculation Imay be begun in either direction between the interior of the operating string and annulus A to wash any excess cement above the plugs P1 and P2. 'Lf fluid is circulated down through the operating string, it will ow out through passages 44 and openings 46 `into the annular space between the mandrel and the setting sleeve, land thence to the surface through annulus A and through ports 13 into casing C. Iif desired, reverse circulation ica-n be elfected by pumping down through casing C, thence through ports 13 and into the annular space between the setting sleeve an'd the mandrel, and thence back through openings 46 and passages 44 into the lbore of the mandrel above plug P2, whence the fluid may return to the surface.

When washing has been completed, additional upward pull may -be taken on the operating string suliicient to `break shear pins 80, thereby releasing the crossover head and shell 45 from its connection to sleeve valve 50 (FIG. 6). This will leave ports 12 closed-off at their inner 'ends by sleeve valve 50 but wi-ll allow plug extension 55 to be drawn upwardly until the upper end of Icap 70 is drawn into bore 66 of closure ring 65 and snap ring 73 is received in snap ring groove 68 of the closure ring. Ports 74 will be moved above seal ipacking 67 and cap 70 will thus effectively close 'off the bore of the setting sleeve. When snap ring 7 4 has been seated in groove 68 a shoulder on the lower end of cap 70 will abut the lower end of ring 65 and continued upward Ipull on the operating string will break shear pins 71, releasing plug extension 55 from cap 70 and thereby releasing the entire operating string and crossover elements for withdrawal from the well.

The closure of the bore of the setting sleeve by means of cap 70 and of ports 12 by sleeve valve 50 (FIG. 7), will close oit the body of cement from application of any hydrostatic heads of iluid present in the interior of the liner and the operating pipe string above the cement, while the seal formed by packer 26 between the setting sleeve and casing C will effectively seal off annulus A above the body of cement, thereby relieving the cement from all hydrostatic heads which otherwise would tend to exert undue pressure on the body of cement and force it into low pressure zones before it could harden and set up. After the cement has thoroughly hardened, if itis desired to drill the hole deeper, sleeve valve 50, closure ring 65, and cap 70 which are made of drillable material, may be drilled out.

It will be understood that various changes and modiications may be made in the details of the illustrative embodiments within the scope of the appended claims lbut without departing from the spirit of this invention.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A liner setting and cementing tool for wells, cornprising, a tubular setting sleeve connectible to a liner insertable in a well, a tubular mandrel connectible to an operating pipe string and insertable in said setting sleeve, connector means securing the mandrel to the setting sleeve operable by rotation of the mandrel relative to the setting sleeve to release the mandrel, a liner hanger slidably mounted on the exterior of the setting sleeve and actuata ble by fluid pressure transmitted from the operating pipe string to anchor the setting sleeve to the surrounding wall of a well casing, annular packer means mounted about the setting sleeve and cooperating with the hanger to seal oi the annular space between the setting sleeve and the well casing in response to downward movement of the setting sleeve relative to the hanger, port means through the wall of the setting sleeve below the packer means, a crossover head vmounted on the mandrel having radial passages initially positioned to communicate the bore of the mandrel with said port means, and having longitudinal passages by-passing said radial passages providing communication between the portions of the bore of the setting sleeve above and below the crossover head, first plug means insertable through the bore of the mandrel and constructed to plug said bore at a point below said radial passages whereby to direct pressure fluid through said passages and said port means to actuate said hanger, sleeve valve means secured to the crossover head below said radial passages shiftable by upward movement of the mandrel relative to the setting sleeve to close-off said port means, a closure member mounted in the setting sleeve below said port means and having an axial opening therein tol receive the lower end of the mandrel in slidable sealing engagement, and a cap member closing the lower end of the mandrel.

2. A liner setting and cementing tool according to claim 1, wherein said liner hanger includes a tubular -cage member carrying means defining a pressure cylinder slidably surrounding said setting sleeve and initially covering said port means.

3. A liner setting and cementing tool according to claim 1 have circulation ports through the wall of said setting sleeve at points above the packer means.

4. A liner setting and cementing tool according to claim 1, having second plug means receivable in the bore of the mandrel above the first plug means to close oi communication between the mandrel and said'radial passages.

5. A liner setting and cementing tool for Wells, comprising, a tubular setting sleeve connectible to a liner for a well bore, a fluid pressure-actuable liner hanger slidably mounted on the exterior of the setting sleeve for anchoring the same to the wall of a well casing in response to relative longitudinal movement between the hanger and the setting sleeve, a packer member mounted about the setting sleeve above the hanger expansible by downward longitudinal movement of the setting sleeve relative to the liner hanger to seal off the annular space between the setting sleeve and the casing, longitudinally spaced upper and lower port means through the wall of the setting sleeve respectively above and below said packer member, a tubular mandrel removably insertable in the bore of the setting sleeve and connectible at its upper end to an operating pipe string, screw means connecting the mandrel kto the setting sleeve releasable by rotation of the mandrel relative to the setting sleeve, a crossover head mounted on the mandrel having lateral passages extending between the mandrel and the setting sleeve initially positioned to register with said lower port means, sleeve valve means initially secured to the crossover head below said lateral passages shiftable by upward movement of the mandrel relative to the setting sleeve to close oit said lower port means, means releasably connecting the sleeve valve means to the crossover head, said crossover head being releasable from said sleeve valve means after the latter has attained said port-closing position by continuation of said upward movement of the mandrel, said mandrel having a downward extensionv below the crossover head, lower and upper plug seats in the mandrel extension below said lateral passages adapted to successively receive plugs for closing the bore of the mandrel below and above said lateral passages, a closure member member mounted in the bore of the setting sleeve below said lower port means and having an axial opening to receive said extension and cooperating therewith to close off the bore of the setting sleeve, and a cap member closing the lower end of the mandrel extension.

6. A liner setting and cementing tool according to claim 5 wherein said liner hanger includes a tubular cage mempressure transmitted thereto through said lower port means.

7. A liner setting and cementing tool according to claim 5 wherein said mandrel extension is telescopically disposed in the lower end of the mandrel and is initially secured thereto in a retracted relation by connection means releasable in response to Huid pressure from the interior of the mandrel.

8. A liner setting and cementing tool according to claim 5 wherein said cap member is receivable in said opening in response to upward movement of said mandrel extension relative to said closure member, said closure member and said cap member having cooperating means for locking said cap member to said closure member, and said cap member having a releasable connection to said mandrel extension operable to release said extension from 10 the cap member following locking engagement of the cap member with the closure member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,328,840 9/1943 OLeary 166-208 3,033,290 5/1962 Brown 166-124 X 3,072,204 1/1963 Brown 166-120 X 3,083,769 4/1963 Brown 166-120 CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

D. H. BROWN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2328840 *Jun 3, 1940Sep 7, 1943O'leary Charles MLiner hanger
US3033290 *Oct 1, 1959May 8, 1962Brown Cicero CScrew-set non-retrievable packer
US3072204 *Jul 15, 1959Jan 8, 1963Brown Oil ToolsGravel packing apparatus for wells
US3083769 *Nov 3, 1955Apr 2, 1963Brown Cicero CWell packers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3364996 *Feb 4, 1966Jan 23, 1968Brown Oil ToolsApparatus for cementing well liners
US3489221 *Jun 17, 1968Jan 13, 1970Gray Tool CoWell completion apparatus and method
US3608634 *Mar 19, 1970Sep 28, 1971Brown Oil ToolsHydraulic set liner hanger
US4180132 *Jun 29, 1978Dec 25, 1979Otis Engineering CorporationService seal unit for well packer
US4372388 *Nov 24, 1980Feb 8, 1983Halliburton CompanySubsurface control valve
US4648445 *Dec 13, 1985Mar 10, 1987Halliburton CompanyFor retrieving and releasing a downhole tool
US4651829 *Dec 13, 1985Mar 24, 1987Halliburton CompanySubsurface control valve
US4848459 *Apr 12, 1988Jul 18, 1989Dresser Industries, Inc.Apparatus for installing a liner within a well bore
US4898243 *Jan 25, 1988Feb 6, 1990Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Liner and drill pipe assembly
US4942924 *Feb 13, 1989Jul 24, 1990Duncan Stewart MLiner setting assembly and method
WO2011057416A1 *Nov 12, 2010May 19, 2011Packers Plus Energy Services Inc.Stage tool for wellbore cementing
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/120, 166/124, 166/212, 166/208, 166/290
International ClassificationE21B33/14, E21B33/13
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/14
European ClassificationE21B33/14
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 5, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: HUGHES TOOL COMPANY A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:BROWN OIL TOOLS, INC. A TX CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003967/0348
Effective date: 19811214