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Publication numberUS3253810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1966
Filing dateNov 21, 1963
Priority dateNov 21, 1963
Publication numberUS 3253810 A, US 3253810A, US-A-3253810, US3253810 A, US3253810A
InventorsJames Penn Charles
Original AssigneeJames Penn Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable ejectable help-summoning device
US 3253810 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FIP8102 May 31, 1966 c. J. PENN PORTABLE EJECTABLE HELP-SUMMONING DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet. 1

Filed Nov. 21, 1963 INVENTOR.

May 31, 1966 J. PENN 3,253,810

PORTABLE EJECTABLE HELP-SUMMONING DEVICE Filed Nov. 21, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Hamil H60 120 IN VEN TOR:

United States Patent 3,253,810 PORTABLE EJECTABLE HELP-SUMMONING DEVICE Charles James Penn, 16411 Sunset Blvd, Pacific Palisades, Calif. Filed Nov. 21, 1963, Ser. No. 325,363 4 Claims. (Cl. 244-138) This invention relates to help-summoning devices and more specifically to means for summoning help to disaster survivors of an aircraft abandoned over either water or solid ground, or to these still in a sunken submarine, or from or in a disabled surface seacraft or a land vehicle, and is a portable ejectable help-summoning device with self-contained means for preservation and performance.

Heretofore occurred frequent failures to hear from and locate survivors of an aircraft, submarine, suface seacraft and/or land vehicle disasters which were often due to simultaneous disablement of the carrier-attached radio broadcasting equipment, if any.

Common portable devices in a portable radio transmitter field, normally suitable for broadcasting a verbal message, are not likely to survive emergency conditions such as ejection and fall from an aircraft, shock in landing, exposure to cold, heat, water and like, nor are they capable of cat-like landing in upward position required for the antenna, nor of raising from under the water to the surface, nor can they be depended upon, if afloat, to remain in the disaster proximity, nor to substitute as a life preserver for a drowning survivor.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a portable device comprising an electric battery or the like, a vocal message receiver-recorder-transmitter, a radio broadcasting equipment, and actuating components-all enclosed in a scalable heat-cold-water-proof housing with self-contained means for assuming and maintaining an upward position in relation to said-equipment-antenna, selfcontained means for projecting the latter upwardly from. the housing automatically at a pre-set time, self-contained means for thereafter actuating automatically the record transmission and thereof radio broadcasting via the projected antenna.

Another object of this invention is to provide in the hereabove described device a self-contained means for slowing the fall of the device when it is ejected from an aircraft.

Still another object of this invention is to provide in said device self-contained means for actuating automatically at a pre-set time the means for slowing the fall of the device.

Also an object of this invention is to provide in said device self-contained shock absorbing means for reducing impact in device landing.

It is also an object of this invention to provide in said device self-contained means for helping the device to raise from under the water to the surface and to keep it afloat.

Among the other objects of this invention is to provide in said device self-contained means for anchoring the device when afloat.

It is also an object of this invention to provide in said device self-contained means for actuating at pre-set time automatically the means for anchoring the device.

It is also an object of this invention to provide in said device self-contained manually pre-operated means for neutralizing one or more of some of the aforesaid various actuating means when engagement of means affected thereby is or are not needed.

It is likewise an object of this invention to make said device susceptible of being carried, lifted and, when afloat, of being held to, substituting as a life-preserver.

It is an important object of this invention to make its 3,253,3W Patented May 31, 1966 reduction to practice simple and durable in manufacture and use.

To illustrate by an example how the above and other objects of this invention can be practically achieved reference now is being made to the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective side view of a device comprising features of this invention and shows the device closed and some of its exposed components in folded positions.

FIGURE 2 is a perspective semi-top view of the device (shown in FIGURE 1) except it shows some of the exposed components unfolded for breaking its fall after the device is ejected from a distance above.

FIGURE 3 is a view of the same device (shown in FIGURE 2) landed on water from above and shows its self-contained anchor anchored to the bottom after release from the device, and shows a self-contained antenna projected from the device and transmitting a radio message, and, in the background, shows disabled aircraft fallen into water after the device has been ejected therefrom.

FIGURE 4 is a view of the device (shown in FIGURE 1) floating on the surface of the water after it was ejected from the indicated disabled and sunken submarine, and shows the anchor anchored to the bottom and the antenna transmitting a radio message.

FIGURE 5 is a view of the device (shown in FIGURE 2) landed on solid ground from above on its still secured thereto anchor, and shows thereby engaged shock absorbing springs secured above the anchor thereagainst.

FIGURE 6 is a view of the device (shown in FIGURE 1) placed over the roof of a land vehicle, and shows the antenna projected from the device and transmitting a radio message,

FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional side view of device shown in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional view taken at 8-8 of FIGURE 7.

FIGURE 9 is a plan view of components indicated in FIGURE 7 and of electric circuits affecting said components.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional side cross-section showing mechanical means for unfolding a fall-breaking component.

FIGURE 1 1 is a sectional view of a front side of the device antenna and shows mechanical means for unfolding antenna side flops when the antenna is projected from the device.

FIGURE 12 is a top view taken at 12-12 of FIG- URE 7.

In reference to the drawings:

Housing 13 is cone-shaped and of durable material and has its inner walls lined with cold-and-heat insulator 14 and has an open neck 15 with open slots 15A, 15B, 15C and 15D (FIGURE 8) facing the opening. Housing 16 1s cylindrically shaped and has a closed upper section 16A of larger diameter than the opening of neck 15; open section 16B; and round bottom 16C adapted for passing through said opening of neck 15; columns 16D, 16E, 16F and 16G connecting bottom 16C with lower walls of closed section 16A; and square funnel 16H; protuberances 16i, 16 16k and 16! extend sidewise outwardly from columns 16D, 16E, 16F and 16G respectively and are respectively smaller than slots 15A, 15B, 15C and 15D respectively. Likewise protuberances 16m16p (FIGURE 7) extend from bottom 16C and respectively opposite the protuberances 16i-16k respectively and at a distance therefrom slightly larger than the wall thickness of housing 13. Circumferentially the locations of said protuberances are respectively co-ordinated with locations of said slots so that they can be inserted simultaneously through the latter. If only the protuberances 16m-16p are so inserted and then housing 16 is turned then apparently protuberances 16i-16k will hold housing 16 against the edges of neck 15 from further descent through the opening of neck 15 (as shown in FIGURE 7). If all of said protuberances are inserted through slots ISA-15D then section 16B of housing 16 will descend into housing 13. The latter has floor 13A at a distance from its top substantially equal to the height of section 16B. Floor 13A has opening 13G and slots corresponding respectively with slots 15A-15D of the opening of neck 15, thus the protuberances 16m-16p may be inserted through the corresponding slots in floor 13A and thereafter housing 16 turned which will lock it in closed position shown in FIGURE 1. To make said locking airtight a rubber washer 17 (FIGURE 7) is mounted around section 16B under sidewise extending bottom walls of section 16A of housing 16. The top wall of section 16A has circular protuberance 18 with a two-stage-opening through the middle section thereof, i.e. the top-stage 18Acone shaped, and the thereunder-stage 18Bsquare shaped and corresponding to funnel 16H and having an off-set in its middle-way occupied by rubber washer 19. Under the floor 13A the housing 13 is further divided into downwardly successive chambers 13B, 13C, 13E and 13F. Chamber 13C is hermetically sealed from others and is either a vacuum or filled with a gas lighter than air, for instance, helium, for reducing weight of the device and helping the upper section thereof to float above water, Chamber 13F is filled with ballast for keeping device in upward position in flight, water or on the ground. Chamber 13B houses electric batteries 20 and radio transmitting equipment 21. Chamber 13E houses a substantially large rotary spool 22 for anchor cord 23 one end of which is tied to anchor shaft 24A of anchor 24 through funnel 25 connecting chamber 13E with the outside. Spool 22 is ordinarily kept from rotating by pin 28 kept in spool seat 22A by inwardly resilient spring 28A (FIGURE 9) which keeps anchor 24 in position shown in FIGURE 7 against shock absorbing springs 26, 26A and like secured to the bottom of housing 13. Handle 27, for carrying and lifting the device or for holding to it in water, is secured over and with top wall of housing 16 and, when disengaged, is brought and kept flat thereagainst by means of springs 27A and 27B (FIG- URE 12). Wings 29, 30, 31 and 32 are hinged circularly with, to and around upper section of housing 13 on the outside thereof under its circularly and outwardly protruding collar 13H (FIGURE adapted for restricting the extent of upward unfolding of said wings, substantially as indicated in FIGURE 10. Outwardly resilient springs, like spring 33, are secured between each of said wings and housing 13 to cause said wings to unfold when not held against the outer side wall of housing 13. Ordinarily said wings are held folded as shown in FIG- URES 1 and 7 by hooks, like hook 34 (FIGURE 7), pivoted within housing 13 and protruding outwardly therefrom through soft rubber washers, like washer 35, sealed in openings therefor in side wall of housing 13 for allowing upward and downward motion for each hook while sealing housing 13. Slot-like openings, like opening 31A (FIGURES 1 and 7) are provided in each wing opposite each of said hooks when the wings are folded, each of said hooks is inserted through a respective slotlike opening in the wing, is pressed down thereagainst and holds the latter folded with co-operation of a respective spring, like spring 33Z. Each of said hooks may be lifted against resiliency of said spring (like 33Z) from within housing 13 by an electromagnet, like 36 and 36A in FIGURE 7. In due time, as described below, said electro-magnets (36, 36A, 36B and 36C in FIGURE 9) are actuated for lifting said respective hooks whereby the wings 29-32 become released and unfold by means of their respective springs, like spring 33 (FIGURE 10).

Wings 29-32 are bridged with each other by V-shaped pieces (37, 37A, 37B, 37CFIGURE 2) of soft strong material, like nylon, secured respectively between opposite side edges of said wings thereto and folded thereunder when the wings are held folded (substantially as indicated in FIGURE 7), and unfolded together with said wings to form therewith a continuous parachute-like roof substantially as indicated in FIGURE 2. The length of an inverted-T-shaped metal square rod 38 has its front side teethed (as indicated in FIGURES 7, 9 and 11) for worm-gear engagement, has a cone-shaped plug 38A secured to its top and adapted to fit-in and seal opening 18A (FIGURE 7), has an elf-set 38B (FIGURE 11) at the base of its thinner section, has two flat rods (38C and 38D) pivoted in said off-set 38B and each having its respective pivoted end-section cut at an angle to restrict extent of their respective unfolding against the thinner section of rod 38, substantially as indicated in FIGURE 11, has outwardly resilient springs 38B and 38F secured between its thinner section and rods 38C and 38D respectively and adapted to force unfolding of the latter two. Rod 38 via its thicker end is inserted into and through housing 16 via opening 18A-18B and funnel 16H until it is held by plug 38A when seated in opening 18A, as shown in FIGURE 7. In so inserting rod 38 the rods 38C and 38D will be pressed (folded) against thinner section of rod 38, as shown. Worm-gear 39 (FIGURES 7 and 9) is turnably secured against teethed side of rod 38 within section 16A of housing 16 and is driven by electric motor 60 for projecting rod 38 (and rods 38C and 38D) from housing 16 substantially as indicated in FIGURES 3-6.

Section 16B of housing 16 (FIGURE 7) houses electrically operated wire-recorder (message-receiver-recorder-transmitter) 40 (FIGURES 7 and 9), two-way switch 41, plug 42 for removable message-delivering-forrecording microphone, antenna brush 65, and four electrically operated timing devices identified in FIGURE 7 under one number 43, and in FIGURE 9 further identified individually as timing devices 43A, 43B, 43C and 43D respectively; device 43A governing actuation of electro-magnets 36, 36A, 36B and 36C for lifting hooks 34, 34A, 34B and 34C for unhooking wings 29-32; device 43B governing actuation of motor 60 for projecting rod 38 from housing 16; device 43C governing actuation of electromagnet 64 for pulling pin 28 from anchor reel 22 whereby the latter will be free to rotate for unwinding of cord 23 therefrom pulled by weight of anchor 24 until or unless latter rests on solid ground; device 43D governing actuation of transmitting by recorder 40 and of radio transmitting equipment 21 for radio-broadcasting of the pre-recorded message via brush 65 conductively pressing against projected TOCI 38 adapted as radio antenna. Devices 43A, 43B and/or 43C, either, any, two or all, may be manually tire-disconnected from battery 20 via respective shut-off switches 43E, 43F and 43G depending upon where and/or wherefrom the entire device is expected to be used, i.e. [from aircraft, over water or ground, submarine and/ or ground vehicle. For instance, if it is to be used from a ground vehicle, the timing devices 43A and 43C are apparently not needed; if from submarine timing device 43A is not needed; if from aircraft over solid ground timing device 43C is not needed, in the latter case anchor 24 need not be ejected from the device but would act as a landing platform of the shock absorbing springs 26, 26A and like when device lands on the ground.

Timing devices 43A, 43B, 43C and 43D have clockwise motors 43H, 43I, 43] and 43K respectively (FIG- URE 9), all, for instance, of equal speed. Said motors have extended axles 44, 45, 46 and 47 respectively. Perpendicularly to said axles are secured thereto conductive inwardly springy handles 48, 49, 50 and 51 respectively. Each handle has an indicated inwise protuberance pointed against circular ring-like face (52, 53, 54

and 55 respectively). Face 52 comprises conductive plate 52A and conductive plate 52B insulated from each other and both on the same level. Circular length of plate 52B depends upon length of time required to effectively unhook wings 29-32. A throw-switch 56 is secured opposite plate 52A for engagement by extension of handle 48 after latter leaves plate 528. Face 53 has similar arrangement of plates 53A and 53B and switch 57, except here the circular length of plate 53B depends on length of time required to project antenna 38 from housing 16. Face 54 comprises conductive plate 54A and sunk conductive plate 54B insulated from each other. Face 55 comprises similar, as in face 54, plates 55A and 553. Electric current is supplied from battery via shown electric circuits A and B leading from its opposite terminals respectively. Cincuit B connects with one terminal of motor 431 via shut-off switch 43F, one terminal of motor 43K, one terminal of motor 43] via shut-off switch 436, one terminal of motor 43H via shut-off switch 43E, one terminal of electro-magnet 64, one terminal of motor 60, one terminal of electromagnets 36A, 36B, C and 36 respectively, terminal B of wire-recorder 40 and one terminal of radio-transmitter set 21. Circuit A connects with handle terminal of the two-way switch 41. 0f the latter one contact-terminal 41A connects with one A terminal of recorder 40 for actuating, when engaged, the latter to receive and record vocal message via plug 42 adapted for removable microphone (indicated in FIGURE 7), the other contact-terminal 41B (of switch 41) is connected with conductive axles 44-47 via brushes (indicated in FIGURE 9) on the timing devices 43A, 43B, 43C and 43D, and with stationary contact-terminals of the throw-switches 56 and 57 respectively.

In timing device 43A terminal A of its motor 43H is connected with the throw-handle-terminal of switch 56, in timing device 43B terminal A of its motor 431 is connected with the throw-handle-terminal of switch 57, in timing device 43C terminal A of its motor 43] is connected with plate 54A, in timing device 43D terminal A of its motor 43K is connected with plate A. In timing device 43A plate 52B is connected with A terminals of electro-magnets 36, 36A, 36B and 36C respectively, in timing device 43B plate 53B is connected with terminal A of motor 60, in timing device 430 plate 54B is connected with terminal A of electro-magnet 64, in timing device 43D plate 55B is connected with second terminal A of recorder 40 for actuating, when engaged, the latter to transmit pre-recorded message, and with terminal A of radio transmitting set 21 for actuating, when engaged, the latter to receive transmission of the pre-recorded message from recorder 40 and to radio retransmit the message via antenna 38 with which set 21 is connected via brush which is connected with the antenna 38 by brushing thereagainst and 'with transmitting terminal of set 21 by circuit as indicated in FIG- URE 9.

In timing devices 43A, 43B, 43C, 43D handles 48-51 may be manually pre-set over any circular point of their respective faces 52-55 respectively. In FIGURE 9 their relative to each other positions indicate that, when actuated, first the handle 48 will reach engage and disengage plate 52B, then it will throw open switch 56 thus deactuating itself; after a while handle 49 will reach, engage and disengage plate 53B then throw open switch 57 thus likewise de-actuating itself; then after a while handle 50 will reach and engage 54B and will remain over the latter (plate 54B) as by reaching it handle 50 de-actuates itself; finally after a while handle 51 Will reach and likewise continuously engage plate 55B. Resultant thereof and at predetermined intervals first the wings 29-32 will be unhooked long enough for their release and unfolding, then, after elaipse of pre-estimated time needed for descent the worm-gear 39 will move antenna 38 upwardly long enough for the antenna to become fully projected, then reel 22 will become continuously released from pin 28 for unpredeterminable degree of unwinding of anchor cord 23, and finally after elapse of a maximum anticipated time needed for the device to descend, for instance, from an aircraft to the ocean and to settle thereupon and get itself anchored, the radio broadcasting of pre-recorded message will be actuated, and, of course, may be repeated continuously by adding common repeater mechanism in the recorder In a case of a disabled aircraft over the ocean the pilot opens the control section of such device, for instance, by pulling housing 16 upward from housing 13 to position shown in FIGURE 7, secures it in such position as has been described, sets handles 48-51 according to prevailing conditions such as fall distance and like, closes switches 43E, 43F, 436 (FIGURE 9), plugs removable microphone into plug 42, turns from normally neutral position the handle of switch 41 to contact terminal 41A thereof, gives verbal message to recorder 40 on what has happened, location, identification, call for help etc., pulls out microphone from plug 42, turns handle of switch 41 to contact terminal 41B thereof, closes and locks the device (as has been described), lifts device by handle 27 and throws it out from the aircraft and follows the device on his own parachute. If the aircraft happens to be over solid ground the pilot leaves switch 43G open (since the anchoring is not required). If device is to be ejected from a sunken submarine or disabled ship, the operator leaves switch 43E open (since unfolding of the wings is not required). If device is to be used from a disabled ground vehicle, the operator leaves switches 43E and 436 open (since neither the unfolding of the wings nor anchoring are required).

While the reduction to practice of the objects of this invention has been hereabove exemplified by the referred to illustration and description it is understood, of course, that various and wide modifications in structure, design, components, arrangements and like within the herein disclosed and taught principles of this invention may be resorted to without jeopardizing this patent protection, and that the latter is limited only by the scope of the accompanying claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A device for carrying in a drop from high altitude to and against land and water, for ascending from under water to surface, for anchoring there and for stabilizing at and after impact with uneven hard ground various contents such as an electrically operated voice recorder and transmitter, radio transmitting equipment, timing devices, electric battery and like and other associated components,

a cone-shaped durable housing comprising a plurality of vertically successive chambers; a first thereof over the relative wider bottom of the housing and with stationary secured there relatively heavy ballast means for keeping said bottom downward; the second chamber over the first and with therein rotatably secured a reel of anchor rope and releasable means for locking the reel against rotating; a relatively narrow passage leading from the second chamber through the first and the bottom; the third and permanently sealed chamber over the second and filled with contra-ballast means for lightening the housing and contents in the fall, touch-down and ascent; the fourth chamber adjacent to the third and adapted for carrying the various contents and having an opening to the outside; releasable closing means for sealing the fourth chamber; outwardly resilient shock-absorbing means secured to and loosely protruding downwardly from the bottom of the housing; a durable and substantially heavy platform sidewise conforming to the cone-shape of the housing when placed and aligned thereunder against and under the shock-absorbing means; releasable means conjunctive with the reel locking means for keeping the platform in such place and alignment and comprising an elongated protuberance from the upper face of the platform and loosely inserted into the passage and secured with the rope of said locked reel; said platform, when so kept, adapted as vertically stabilizing means for the housing dropped over uneven land, and, when the reel is unlocked, as, released on the rope, anchor means for the housing in water.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein the housing has on the outside a plurality of wing-like hard plates respectively hinged to and around the upper side section of the housing for rigid securement therewith and for folding downwardly against the side wall of the housing and for unfolding upwardly therefrom, said plates of shape and length substantially conforming to the shape and length of the housing when in the folded position; outwardly resilient means for unfolding the plates upwardly; means for limiting the unfolding of the plates to a substantially horizontal position; releasable means for holding the plates in folded position; durable substantially soft material secured with and under the plates for fully connecting the latter bridge-like with each other in substantially umbrella-like manner when the plates are unfolded, and for collapsing thereunder when the plates are kept in folded position.

3. A device for carrying substantially fragile contents in a drop from high altitude to and against land and water, for ascending from under water to surface, for anchoring there and for stabilizing vertically at and after impact on uneven hard ground,

a cone-shaped durable housing comprising therewithin a substantially heavy ballast means close to the bottom to keep the latter downwards; a rotatably secured reel of anchor rope; releasable means for locking the reel against rotating; a downward passage leading to the outside from the reel; above the reel a permanently sealed contra-ballast means for cooperating with thereunder ballast means in keeping the bottom downwards, and for lightening the housing and the contents in the fall, touch-down and ascent, and for increasing the housing buoyancy in water; a compartment having an upwardly directed opening to the outside for storing the substantially fragile contents; releasable closing means for sealing the open compartment; outside of the housing an outwardly resilient shock-absorbing means secured to and loosely protruding downwardly from the bottom; a substantially heavy platform with a flat bottom face and concaved top face forming a radially substantially sharp grabbing edge in meeting with side walls of the platform, said side walls conforming with the cone-shape of the housing when the platform is placed and aligned therewith thereunder against and under the shock-absorbing means; releasable means conjunctive with the reel locking means for keeping the platform in such place and alignment and including an elongated protuberance stationary with and upwardly projecting from the top face of the platform and loosely inserted into the passage and secured with the rope of locked reel; said platform, when so kept, adapted as vertically stabilizing means for the housing dropped over uneven land, and, when the reel is unlocked, as, released on the rope, anchoring means for the housing in water; an umbrella-like means for retarding the falling speed of the housing and comprising durable soft and pliable sheet material extending under and secured to a folding radial frame of rigid plates respectively hinged to and around the outside upper circumference of the housing for folding downwardly against the housing sides and over then collapsed thereunder the plates-bridging sections of the soft material and then conforming to the cone-shape and length of the housing, and for unfolding upwardly in umbrella-like manner; means for restricting the degree of the unfolding; outwardly resilient means for causing the unfolding; releasable means for holding the umbrella-like means in the folded position.

4. A device for carrying down a load in upward position in a drop from high altitude with retarded falling speed,

a substantially cone-shaped housing comprising predominant weight in the lower section thereof; a plurality of rigid alike plates matching the housing shape and length when placed sidewise thereagainst therearound substantially adjacent to each other, said plates being radially hinged by their narrowest sides to and around the housing outer top circumference for folding downwardly against the housing sides and for unfolding upwardly therefrom; means for re-' stricting the unfolding of the plates to a substantially horizontal position; outwardly resilient means for unfolding the plates; releasable means for holding the plates in folded position; pliant sheet material means secured to and under the plates and extended therebetween for fully bridging the plates with each other umbrella-like when said plates are unfolded, and for collapsing under the plates when the latter are held in folded position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,310,017 2/1943 Canon et a1. 325-116 2,470,783 5/ 1949 Mead.

2,500,809 3/1950 Fennessy et a1. 325l14 2,519,553 8/1950 Faulkner 3251l4 2,825,803 3/1958 Newbrough 3251 14 X 2,907,875 10/1959 Seyfang 325-1l6 X 2,928,935 3/1960 Murray 325-116 X FERGUS S. MIDDLETON, Primary Examiner.

DAVID G. REDINBAUGH, Examiner.

J. W. CALDWELL, A. E. CORRIGAN,

Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2310017 *May 5, 1941Feb 2, 1943Gard Well Co IncEmergency transmitter
US2470783 *May 15, 1945May 24, 1949Mead Vincent APlane marker buoy
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US2519553 *Sep 24, 1948Aug 22, 1950Wallis Faulkner ArundellRadio apparatus for aircraft
US2825803 *Jun 3, 1955Mar 4, 1958Newbrough Louis HCrash position signalling indicator
US2907875 *Sep 26, 1957Oct 6, 1959Seyfang Frank GEmergency radio transmitter
US2928935 *Oct 9, 1958Mar 15, 1960Murray Thomas KDistress signaling device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3327967 *Mar 31, 1965Jun 27, 1967Paul R SchrantzSatellite blade retaining device
US3465251 *Apr 6, 1966Sep 2, 1969Us ArmyImpact damper and antenna release mechanisms for airborne radio recovery beacon
US3496906 *Feb 2, 1968Feb 24, 1970Us NavyDay/night bidirectional marine marker
US3500209 *Nov 24, 1965Mar 10, 1970Fletcher Gordon WilliamStabilized radio rescue beacon
US3798629 *Feb 11, 1972Mar 19, 1974Degraves JAlarm system for divers
US3876942 *Sep 21, 1973Apr 8, 1975Aero Electronics Dev Co IncEmergency airplane locating transmitter
US3933109 *Nov 29, 1973Jan 20, 1976Etat FrancaisBuoy releasable from a submarine
US3943445 *Apr 8, 1974Mar 9, 1976Dawson Edward FApparatus for signalling position of downed aircraft
US4232391 *Jan 19, 1978Nov 4, 1980Zanutti Hugo AVessel location system
US4673363 *Nov 8, 1985Jun 16, 1987Sippican Ocean Systems, Inc.Marine measurement device
US4932910 *Nov 21, 1988Jun 12, 1990Hayday Birgitt BEmergency location marker system
US6706966Jul 6, 2001Mar 16, 2004L-3 Communications CorporationHardened voyage data recorder
US8687375 *Aug 7, 2009Apr 1, 2014Rafael Q. UyAutomated distress locator transmission system
US20120113575 *Aug 7, 2009May 10, 2012Uy Rafael QAutomated distress locator transmission system
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/138.00A, 455/96, 441/26, 455/98, 441/28, 441/11
International ClassificationB64D45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64D2045/0065, B64D45/00
European ClassificationB64D45/00