Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3253944 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 31, 1966
Filing dateJan 13, 1964
Priority dateJan 13, 1964
Publication numberUS 3253944 A, US 3253944A, US-A-3253944, US3253944 A, US3253944A
InventorsWurster Dale E
Original AssigneeWisconsin Alumni Res Found
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Particle coating process
US 3253944 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 31, 1966 D. E. WURSTER PARTICLE COATING PROCESS Filed Jan. 13, 1964 INVENTOR.

DALE E WURSTER A TTOR/VEY United States Patent 3,253,944 PARTICLE COATING PROCESS Dale E. Wurster, Madison, Wis., assignor to Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Madison, Wis, a corporation of Wisconsin Filed Jan. 13, 1964, Ser. No. 337,481 1 Claim. (Cl. 117-400) The present application is a continuati-on-in-part of copending application Serial No. 861,063, filed December 21, 1959.

The present invention relates to the coating art and more specifically to improvements in the air suspension coating process. This process and illustrative apparatus for carrying out the process are described in my prior Patents No. 2,648,609 and No. 3,089,824. As shown in these disclosures, the particles to be coated, e.g., tablets and the like, are suspended in a coating tower in a moving gas stream, e.g., an air stream, and the coating composition in atomized or like form is introduced into the gas stream prior to its contact with the suspended particles to be coated.

In practice it has been found that improved uniform coating can be obtained by the controlled cyclic flow in the coating tower of the particles being coated. It has also been found that a definite cyclic pattern can be established with aeration of the complete tower to provide a suspended bed of particles in which all particles are suspended in an upwardly flowing gas stream, by varying the velocity of the gas in different parts of the tower. A preferred way of carrying this out is by producing an upward movement of particles in the part or side of the tower in which the coating composition is introduced by maintaining the gas in this part of the tower, where the application of the coating to the particles takes place, at a velocity sufficient to lift the particles upwardly, surrounded'by a cushion of air, and substantially out of contact with each other until the coating is substantially dry. At this point the particles then pass to the top portion of the other part or side of the tower where the velocity of the gas is maintained insufficient to keep the particles from moving downwardly but adequate to maintain them in substantially weightless contact with each other as they move in a streamline fashion downwardly and return to the high velocity part of the tower.

This type of operation allows a large area of the particles to be coated in each pass through the coating section of the tower with a liquid coating of suflicient thickness to give a smooth surface. Agglomeration is also prevented by maintaining the particles out of contact with each other until the coating is dry. In addition, possible smearing or attrition of the coating is prevented by maintaining the particles in substantially weightless contact with each other during the return cycle.

In practice is has been found that if the coating is applied to only a small part of the tablet or like particle, e.g., a few droplets at one time, the tablets tend to develop rough surfaces and may even develop what is known in the art as ears. I have discovered that this can be avoided if the coating is applied during each pass or cycle to a large or substantial part of the tablet, e.g., one side of the tablet, at one time.

Fluidized beds in general are characterized by randomness of particle motion. It has been found that such random motion is undesirable particularly when coating tablets or larger particles. Therefore velocity differences which set cyclic flow patterns as herein described are fundamental to the rapid application and development of smooth elegant surfaces. If particles are caused to move in and out of the coating zone randomly, the coating can be applied only at a slow rate. Particle contact must be delayed until suflicient drying has occurred to' prevent sticking. With random action the drying time is indeterminate. Conversely when a cyclic flow pattern is established by controlled velocity differences as described below, without randomness of particle motion characteristic of fluidized beds, relatively long periods of time can exist between collisions or contacts between particles, and more drying can be accomplished.

By the procedures described the particles are given upward velocity just as they are returned to the coating zone. This velocity is sufficient to transport the particles to the top of the bed by which time the gas velocity has decreased and become uniform by diffusion, and the particles drop to the surface of the remaining portion of the bed. When velocity differences are maintained as described, the tablets are also supported by air to an extent that they are practically weightless during that portion of the cycle by which they are returned to the coating zone.

During the period of vertical upward travel the tablets or other particles are also substantially separated from each other by films of the air or gas used for supporting the bed. In this manner a specific time is provided for drying or removal of the coating solvent under ideal conditions, i.e., no contact of particles and maximum gas velocity, and fast coating rates result. Maximum coating rates are important, for only under those conditions can a substantial part of the tablet surface be coated per pass or cycle and thus provide a smooth rather than rough or sandy surface. 7

For a more complete understanding of the practical application of the principles of my invention reference is made to the appended drawings which show an apparatus suitable for carrying out the process of the invention. In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary vertical cross-section of the lower portion of the apparatus;

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view taken at line 22 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 3 is an alternative arrangement of the grid shown in FIGURE 2.

Referring more particularly to FIGURE 1, the apparatus basically includes a vertically disposed tower 10, an air supply system and a coating material feed system. Tower 10 is a vertically elongated hollow shell, con structed or rigid, hard material such as steel or aluminum, or a transparent synthetic resin (e.g., Lucite), or similar material or combinations of these. At its lower end tower 10 includes a frustoconical lower end or throat section 12, reducing somewhat the diameter of the opening into tower 10 at its lower end.

Depending from throat section 12, tower 10 is provided with an elongated nozzle section 14 which com municates at its upper end with the opening into section 12. The lower end of nozzle section 14 terminates in a generally curved cylindrical conduit section 16 into which the air supply system is connected. A grid 18 in the form of a pair of screens 20 and 22 is mounted in the upper end of nozzle section 14 extending completely across the interior of such section. The screens may be mounted on a frame portion 24 which is connected across the lower end of section 12. As shown in the drawing, the air stream entering the bottom of tower 10 is substantially coextensive with the cross-sectional area of the suspended bed of particles in the tower. This is essential for proper aeration of the complete tower and specifically of the downwardly moving bed, which moves downwardly countercurrent to the upwardly flowing, low velocity air stream, as well as for proper aeration of the upwardly moving bed, which moves upwardly concurrent with the upwardly flowing, high velocity air stream.

Alternatively, as shown in FIGURE 3, the grid 18 may be fabricated without the diametric support 24 by allowing the coarse mesh screen 20 to cover the entire opening from section 14 to the frustoconical section 12, and fastening fine mesh screen'22 to the coarse mesh screen Fine mesh screen 22' does not cover the entire opening but is partly cut away. Screen 22' may be a semicircle covering one side of screen 20' to give the same effect as the embodiment of FIGURE 2, or a smaller or different shape segment may be cut out.

The upper portion of tower (not shown) may be further provided with a disengaging means of known design to facilitate disengagement of entrained fines, and also with an exhaust connection and a stack or fine or solvent recovery'system. See Patent No. 3,089,824, supra. The air supply system is conventional in nature and includes suitable provision for controlling humidity of and for heating air which is blown into the lower end .of section 16 through an air conduit 26 which is connected directly to section 16.

The coating feed material system which is more completely described in Patent No. 3,089,824, basically is arranged to introduce the coating materials, which are dissolved or dispersed or dissolved and dispersed in a volatile fluid, under suitable pressure through an inlet connection 28 of an atomizer 30 extending into the lower end of nozzle section 14. The material feed system further includes a second air inlet connection 32 leading into atomizer 30 for admitting compressed air to assist in atomizing the coating materials. It will be noted that compressed air inlet 32 and coating material inlet 28 enter section 14 to one side of that section (left side in the drawings) and the fluids are directed at an angle toward each other at the outlet end to form atomizer 30.

The grid 18 which is located at the lower end of throat section 12 consists as described of two preferably semicircular screens and 22 which are adjacent on a com- 'mon support 24. Screen 20 has a relatively coarse mesh, e.g., 10 mesh, and is positioned directly above nozzle on the left in the drawings. Screen 22 has a relatively fine mesh, preferably consisting of several layered sections of fine mesh, e.g., 200 mesh, screen material and is positioned to the right in the drawings. Fine mesh screen 22 offers considerably more resistance to air flow, so that the greater part of the air introduced into supply conduit 26 will be diverted to the coarse mesh side (left in the drawings) and pass into the tower 10 with a greater velocity on the left or coating side of the tower than on the right side of the tower.

In operation a charge of particles to be coated, such as tablets is admitted to tower 10. This charge is retained on porous grid 18 having areas of differing porosity. Gas, e.g., warm air, is introduced into the tower 10 through inlet connection 26. The velocity of air entering tower 10 through inlet connection 26 is adjusted such that the charge of tablets to be coated is suspended in throat section 12. It has been noted that by reason of the employment of a coarse screen 20 on one side of the inlet to section 12 and a fine screen 22 on the other side a greater quantity of air is permitted to enter section 12 on one side (left as illustrated) than on the other. As a consequence the bed is unequally supported by the air stream passing upwardly through nozzle section 14. The effect of this is to produce a general 'moving flow of tablets T upwardly on the left side of the bed and downwardly on the right side. Moreover, as tablets T commence to flow upwardly immediately above screen 20 in the relatively higher velocity air stream they are carried apart substantially out of contact with one another and move at a relatively rapid rate, for example, approximately 2' per second in the case of tablets having a diameter of approximately /8. As tablet-s Treach the upper part of tower 16, they substantially stop moving upwardly because of the reduced velocity of the air stream caused by the resistance of the tablets and diffusion of the stream. Tablets T then spill over into the still lower velocity air stream on the right side of bed B, where they are permitted to fall gently and in substantially weightless contact, supported by the upwardly flowing air stream issuing through fine mesh screen 22, until they reach a point in section 12 (or above grid 18) where the air stream has velocity sufficient to support them. At this point the particles move to the left from directly over screen 22 to directly over screen 20 by the continuing flow of tablets descending from above. Thus tablets are introduced again into the higher velocity air stream issuing through screen 20 and are again carried up to repeat the cycle.

It will be apparent from the previous description that by reason of the relatively higher rate of tablet movement in the high velocity air stream side of tower 10 the bed is substantially less dense in that side than where it moves downwardly in the lower velocity air stream. Aspointed out above, the maintenance of a number of tablets substantially out of contact with each other is a desideratum in order to coat-the tablets in accordance with the process of this invention. Atomizer 30 is positioned to introduce all of the coating material into the air stream which has the relatively higher velocity so as to provide for the coating of only the tablets moving upwardly and after they have achieved substantially their maximum upward velocity in the high velocity air stream. Once the bed of tablets has been established with tablets T flowing upwardly through one portion of the bed and downwardly through a second portion of the bed B, the coating materials are introduced through inlet connection 28 and atomized in nozzle 30 by compressed air introduced through inlet connection 32 which impinges against the coating materials. The atomized coating materials as noted above are carried by the relatively higher velocity air stream passing through screen 20 directly into contact with the well separated tablets T in the upwardly rising portion of the bed.

By reason of the spacing of tablets T in this portion of the bed as they rise upwardly in the higher velocity air stream, the coating materials generally tend to coat at least a half of each tablet T contacted by the coating materials thereby avoiding the possibility of the growth of rough surfaces on the tablets. As the tablets T which have been partially coated by the coating materials rise upwardly in the bed, the coating material on them is dried by the warm gas or air stream supporting them such that by the time'the partially coated tablets T reach the upper part of tower 10 and spill over into the downwardly flowing portion of the bed B supported by the lower velocity air stream issuing through screen 22, the coating materials on such tablets have substantially dried, and the contact between tablets.which occurs in the downwardly flowing, more dense portion of bed B does not. cause the tablets to agglomerate. As the cyclic movement of each tablet in the bed continues the tablet presents itself above or in front of nozzle 30 many times and in many different positions, permitting a coating to be built uniformly about the tablet. When the desired thickness of coating has been built up on the bed as a whole, which occurs at a fairly uniform rate for all the tablets in the bed, the admission of coating materials into nozzle section 14 is terminated. The supporting air stream is then stopped and the bed collapses on grid 18 and the coated tablets are removed from the apparatus in accordance with standard procedures in the art.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various means can be employed to vary or control the velocity of the gas stream used to suspend the particles to be coated to obtain a cyclic flow pattern of the type described above. The grids described above, for example, can be replaced or be used in combination with conventional dampers or like movable plates for regulating the flow of gas. In the present invention this can be readily accomplished by positioning a standard damper in conduit section 16 to direct the higher velocity gas stream toward atomizer 30. Instead of retarding the flow of one part of a single gas stream, the gas supply system can also be made up of a multiple of gas streams of varying velocities to obtain the desired controlled cyclic flow of the particles through the coating zone. A preferred embodiment, however, includes the use of porous grids or screens as illustrated which can include the modification in which the portion of the screen directly above nozzle 30 is cut completely away and the nozzle positioned so that it is at or slightly above the level of the screen.

I claim:

The process of coating particles with coating material in a vertically disposed coating tower, whichcomprises forming an air suspended bed of particles in which all particles are suspended in an upwardly flowing air stream entering the bottom of said tower, said air stream entering the bottom of said tower being substantially coextensive with the cross-sectional area of said suspended bed in said tower, imparting controlled cyclic movement to 'the particles with a portion of the suspended bed flowing upwardly and the other portion of the suspended bed flowing downwardly without randomness of particle motion characteristic of fluidized beds, by directing the upwardly flowing air stream into the bottom of said tower in a high velocity upwardly flowing air stream in one part of said tower in which the particles are suspended and move upwardly concurrent to the upwardly flowing high velocity air stream substantially out of contact with each other in the portion of the suspended bed subjected to said high velocity air stream and pass to the top of the downwardly flowing portion of said bed, and a low velocity upwardly flowing air stream in the other portion of said tower in which the particles move downwardly and settle through the upwardly flowing low velocity air stream in substantially weightless contact with each other and in substantially undisturbed relation in the portion of the suspended bed subjected to said low velocity air stream and pass to the bottom of the'upwardly flowing portion of said bed, and directing all of said coating material into the high velocity air stream to provide for the coating of only the particles moving upwardly in said high velocity air stream.

References (Iited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD D. NEVIUS, Primary Examiner.

JOSEPH B. SPENCER, Examiner.

United states-"Patent [191' Wurster [54] PARTICLE COATING PROCESS Dale E. Wurster, Madison, Wis.

Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Madison, Wis.

[75] Inventor: [73] Assignee:

Reexamination Request No. 90/000,004, Jul. 1, 1981 [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 861,063, Dec. 21,

1959, abandoned.

[51] Int. Cl. B05D 3/00; BOSD 1/72 [52] US. 427/213; 118/62; 118/303; 34/57A [56] References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 2,768,095 10/1956 Tadema 117/100 3,089,824 5/1963 Wurster... 3,196,827 7/ 1965 Wurster... 3,241,520 3/1966 Wurster...

FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS 596,861 5/1961 Belgium. 656,429 l/ 1963 Canada. 676,215 12/1963 Canada.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Hinkes, Tom, Seed Particle Coating, in Marshall, ed.. F luidized Bed Mixing, Granulating and Drying Technology, Section E [East Brunswick, New

[45] Certificate Issued Apr. 13, 1981 Jersey: The Institute rot Applied Pharmaceutical Sci ences (1980)] Primary Examiner-Shrive P. Beck EXEMPLARY CLAIM The process of coating particles with coating mate rial in a vertically disposed coating tower, whicl comprises forming an air suspended bed of particles i1 which all particles are suspended in an upwardl flowing air stream entering the bottom of said tower said air stream entering the bottom of said towe being substantially coextensive with the cross-section al area of said suspended bed in said tower, impartin; controlled cyclic movement to the particles with portion of the suspended bed flowing upwardly am the other portion of the suspended bed flowing down wardly without randomness of particle motion char acteristic of fluidized beds, by directing the upwardl; flowing air streaminto the bottom of said tower in high velocity upwardly flowing air stream in one par of said tower in which the particles are suspended ant move upwardly concurrent to the upwardly flowin; high velocity air stream substantially out of contac with each other in the portion of the suspended be subjected to said high velocity air stream and pass tt the top of the downwardly flowing portion of sait bed, and a low velocity upwardly flowing air stream in the other portion of said tower in which the parti cles move downwardly and settle through the up wardly flowing low velocity air stream in substantial ly weightless contact with each other and in substan tially undisturbed relation in the portion of the sus pended bed subjected to said low velocity air strear and pass to the bottom of the upwardly flowing poi tion of said bed, and directing all of said coatin material into the high velocity air stream to provid for the coating of only the particles moving upwardl in said high velocity air stream.

REEXAMINATION CERTIFICATE ISSUED UNDER 35 U.S.C. 307

NO AMENDMENTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO THE PATENT The patcmability of the claim is confirmed. 5 t 4: m =0: =1:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2059983 *Jun 27, 1932Nov 3, 1936Gen Plastics IncMethod of coating abrasive particles
US2644769 *Dec 31, 1948Jul 7, 1953Phillips Petroleum CoCoating of ammonium nitrate fertilizer
US2648609 *Jan 21, 1949Aug 11, 1953Wisconsin Alumni Res FoundMethod of applying coatings to edible tablets or the like
US2768095 *May 28, 1953Oct 23, 1956Shell DevProcess of coating finely divided solid material
US2799241 *Feb 6, 1953Jul 16, 1957Wisconsin Alumni Res FoundMeans for applying coatings to tablets or the like
US2865868 *Apr 4, 1952Dec 23, 1958Gulf Research Development CoProcess for preparing impregnated composite catalysts
US2986475 *Nov 5, 1958May 30, 1961Smith Kline French LabApparatus and method for coating discrete solids
US3003752 *May 20, 1958Oct 10, 1961Fuller CoMethod and apparatus for conditioning pulverulent or granular material
US3112220 *Feb 26, 1960Nov 26, 1963Abbott LabMethod and apparatus for coating particles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3354863 *Oct 28, 1963Nov 28, 1967Dow Chemical CoApparatus for coating particulate materials
US3379554 *Apr 21, 1964Apr 23, 1968Merck & Co IncSpray coating of pharmaceutical cores with a carboxylvinyl polymer and polyethylene glycol
US3386182 *Sep 13, 1966Jun 4, 1968Bayer AgMethod of and apparatus for the mixing, drying or moistening by pneumatic means of material in powder form
US3394468 *Jun 10, 1966Jul 30, 1968Glatt WernerContainer for the reception of a pulverulent or granular feed for treatment in a hot air dryer
US3431138 *Jul 14, 1967Mar 4, 1969American Cyanamid CoMethod for coating pharmaceutical forms with methyl cellulose
US3486240 *Oct 22, 1965Dec 30, 1969Blaw Knox CoRoasting method and apparatus
US3880116 *Feb 14, 1974Apr 29, 1975Arnar Stone LabParticle coating apparatus
US3972220 *May 7, 1975Aug 3, 1976The Dow Chemical CompanyMethod for testing the resilience of solid particles
US3992558 *May 10, 1974Nov 16, 1976Raychem CorporationProcess of coating particles of less than 20 microns with a polymer coating
US4217127 *Feb 28, 1979Aug 12, 1980Ube Industries, Ltd.Process for producing urea granules
US4445919 *Mar 14, 1983May 1, 1984Thermo Electron CorporationIn situ rapid wash apparatus and method
US4503030 *Jun 6, 1983Mar 5, 1985Alza CorporationDevice for delivering drug to certain pH environments
US4576108 *Oct 3, 1984Mar 18, 1986Frito-Lay, Inc.Apparatus for applying viscous seasoning evenly to tumbling food articles
US4658754 *Oct 5, 1984Apr 21, 1987Maschinenfabrik Heid AktiengesellschaftEquipment for the uniform dosage, dispersion and application of protective coatings with liquid formula, particularly seed-dressing means
US4759956 *May 22, 1987Jul 26, 1988Lever Brothers CompanyProcess for encapsulating particles using polymer latex
US4960244 *May 8, 1989Oct 2, 1990Schering CorporationAtomizing nozzle assembly
US5115578 *Mar 5, 1991May 26, 1992Vector CorporationDischarge mechanism for a large fluid bed/dryer granulator
US5160742 *Dec 31, 1991Nov 3, 1992Abbott LaboratoriesSystem for delivering an active substance for sustained release
US5207933 *Aug 28, 1991May 4, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyLiquid fabric softener with insoluble particles stably suspended by soil release polymer
US5211896 *Jun 7, 1991May 18, 1993General Motors CorporationComposite iron material
US5211985 *Oct 9, 1991May 18, 1993Ici Canada, Inc.Multi-stage process for continuous coating of fertilizer particles
US5232612 *Aug 28, 1991Aug 3, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanySolid, particulate fabric softener with protected, dryer-activated, cyclodextrin/perfume complex
US5232613 *Aug 28, 1991Aug 3, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for preparing protected particles of water sensitive material
US5234611 *Aug 28, 1991Aug 10, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyFabric softener, preferably liquid, with protected, dryer-activated, cyclodextrin/perfume complex
US5236615 *Aug 28, 1991Aug 17, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanySolid, particulate detergent composition with protected, dryer-activated, water sensitive material
US5258132 *Mar 31, 1992Nov 2, 1993Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Wax-encapsulated particles
US5350659 *Mar 31, 1993Sep 27, 1994Xerox CorporationPreparation of conductive toners using fluidized bed processing equipment
US5399186 *Nov 16, 1992Mar 21, 1995Ici Canada, Inc.Apparatus and process for coating particles
US5545414 *Mar 22, 1995Aug 13, 1996Abbott LaboratoriesCholesterol lowering food product
US5587207 *Aug 24, 1995Dec 24, 1996Gorokhovsky; Vladimir I.Arc assisted CVD coating and sintering method
US5591373 *Feb 15, 1996Jan 7, 1997General Motors CorporationComposite iron material
US5628945 *Aug 3, 1992May 13, 1997Riman; Richard E.Multicomponent powder mixing process and compositions produced thereby
US6209479Dec 30, 1998Apr 3, 2001Aeromatic-Fielder AgApparatus for coating tablets
US6280683Oct 22, 1999Aug 28, 2001Hoeganaes CorporationMetallurgical compositions containing binding agent/lubricant and process for preparing same
US6296842Aug 10, 2000Oct 2, 2001Alkermes Controlled Therapeutics, Inc.Process for the preparation of polymer-based sustained release compositions
US6368658Apr 17, 2000Apr 9, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Coating medical devices using air suspension
US6376011Apr 7, 2000Apr 23, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Process for preparing superabsorbent-containing composites
US6379498Feb 28, 2000Apr 30, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for adding an adsorbable chemical additive to pulp during the pulp processing and products made by said method
US6387495Apr 7, 2000May 14, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Superabsorbent-containing composites
US6409883Apr 12, 2000Jun 25, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Methods of making fiber bundles and fibrous structures
US6410087 *Nov 1, 1999Jun 25, 2002Medical Carbon Research Institute, LlcDeposition of pyrocarbon
US6479065Mar 7, 2001Nov 12, 2002Alkermes Controlled Therapeutics, Inc.Process for the preparation of polymer-based sustained release compositions
US6582560Mar 7, 2001Jun 24, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for using water insoluble chemical additives with pulp and products made by said method
US6602315Jul 20, 2001Aug 5, 2003Hoeganaes CorporationMetallurgical compositions containing binding agent/lubricant and process for preparing same
US6685775Feb 19, 2002Feb 3, 2004Vector CorporationWurster air diverter
US6730349Mar 1, 2002May 4, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Mechanical and acoustical suspension coating of medical implants
US6740406Dec 15, 2000May 25, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Coated activated carbon
US6767553Dec 18, 2001Jul 27, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Natural fibers treated with acidic odor control/binder systems
US6852904Dec 18, 2001Feb 8, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Cellulose fibers treated with acidic odor control agents
US6984290Mar 14, 2003Jan 10, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for applying water insoluble chemical additives with to pulp fiber
US7407551Nov 4, 2003Aug 5, 2008Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Mechanical and acoustical suspension coating of medical implants
US7429407Sep 16, 2003Sep 30, 2008Aeromatic Fielder AgProcess for coating small bodies, including tablets
US7749356Mar 7, 2001Jul 6, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for using water insoluble chemical additives with pulp and products made by said method
US7993490Jun 9, 2010Aug 9, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for applying chemical additives to pulp during the pulp processing and products made by said method
US8039048Nov 2, 2009Oct 18, 2011Certainteed CorporationAlgae resistant roofing granules with controlled algaecide leaching rates, algae resistant shingles and process for producing same
US8541028Aug 3, 2005Sep 24, 2013Evonik CorporationMethods for manufacturing delivery devices and devices thereof
US8668954Sep 8, 2010Mar 11, 2014Certainteed CorporationAlgae resistant roofing granules with controlled algaecide leaching rates, algae resistant shingles and process for producing same
US8728528Dec 18, 2008May 20, 2014Evonik CorporationProcess for preparing microparticles having a low residual solvent volume
US8889213Jan 26, 2010Nov 18, 2014Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.Processes for coating a carrier with microparticles
US9060543 *Feb 9, 2012Jun 23, 2015Spice Application Systems, Ltd.Comestible coating delivery method and apparatus
US9540822Nov 19, 2010Jan 10, 2017Certainteed CorporationComposite nanoparticles for roofing granules, roofing shingles containing such granules, and process for producing same
US20020071872 *Aug 8, 2001Jun 13, 2002Mcnally Gerard P.Laxative composition
US20030159786 *Mar 14, 2003Aug 28, 2003Runge Troy MichaelMethod for using water insoluble chemical additives with pulp and products made by said method
US20030165614 *Mar 1, 2002Sep 4, 2003Henrik HansenCoating a medical implant using a pan coater
US20040045687 *Sep 11, 2002Mar 11, 2004Shannon Thomas GerardMethod for using water insoluble chemical additives with pulp and products made by said method
US20040071892 *Jul 28, 2003Apr 15, 2004Aeromatic-Fielder AgProcess for coating bodies, including tablets
US20040089230 *Nov 4, 2003May 13, 2004Schwarz Marlene C.Mechanical and acoustical suspension coating of medical implants
US20040131791 *Sep 16, 2003Jul 8, 2004Kim Torben-WalterProcess for coating small bodies, including tablets
US20050103210 *Feb 25, 2003May 19, 2005Peter KingProduct coating method and apparatus
US20050142965 *Dec 29, 2003Jun 30, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Surface charge manipulation for improved fluid intake rates of absorbent composites
US20050271709 *Aug 14, 2003Dec 8, 2005Dazliel Sean MCoated soy product and method for coating
US20060029637 *Aug 3, 2005Feb 9, 2006Tice Thomas RMethods for manufacturing delivery devices and devices thereof
US20060051819 *Jun 17, 2005Mar 9, 2006The Texas A&M University SystemDetection, evaluation and treatment for advanced prostate cancer
US20060068019 *Aug 14, 2003Mar 30, 2006Dalziel Sean MCoated polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing particles and coated liquid pharmaceutical-containing particles
US20060204613 *Feb 15, 2006Sep 14, 2006Castro Armando JChewing gum containing flavor delivery systems
US20060251807 *Apr 21, 2006Nov 9, 2006Hong Keith CRoofing Granules With Improved Surface Coating Coverage And Functionalities And Method For Producing Same
US20060286200 *Apr 11, 2006Dec 21, 2006Castro Armando JConfections containing flavor delivery systems
US20060292271 *Jun 27, 2005Dec 28, 2006Peter KingSpray coating method and apparatus
US20070148342 *Dec 13, 2006Jun 28, 2007Kalkanoglu Husnu MControlled time-release algae resistant roofing system
US20090061068 *Jun 13, 2006Mar 5, 2009Clive Edward MarshmanIron Fortified Food Product and Additive
US20090196907 *Jan 28, 2009Aug 6, 2009Bunick Frank JEdible film-strips for immediate release of active ingredients
US20090196908 *Jan 28, 2009Aug 6, 2009Der-Yang LeeEdible film-strips with modified release active ingredients
US20100047524 *Nov 2, 2009Feb 25, 2010Hong Keith CAlgae resistant roofing granules with controlled algaecide leaching rates, algae resistant shingles and process for producing same
US20100136143 *Apr 3, 2008Jun 3, 2010Shmuel BukshpanNew compositions and methods for cell killing
US20100189878 *Jan 26, 2010Jul 29, 2010Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.Processes for coating a carrier with microparticles
US20100243187 *Jun 9, 2010Sep 30, 2010Troy Michael RungeMethod for Applying Chemical Additives to Pulp During the Pulp Processing and Products Made by Said Method
US20110034993 *Aug 13, 2010Feb 10, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Coated medical implants
US20110159240 *Nov 19, 2010Jun 30, 2011Ming Liang ShiaoComposite nanoparticles for roofing granules, roofing shingles containing such granules, and process for producing same
US20110217515 *Sep 8, 2010Sep 8, 2011Hong Keith CAlgae resistant roofing granules with controlled algaecide leaching rates, algae resistant shingles and process for producing same
US20120207888 *Feb 9, 2012Aug 16, 2012Spice Application Systems LimitedComestible Coating Delivery Method and Apparatus
EP0206417A2Jun 18, 1986Dec 30, 1986THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYDry bleach stable enzyme composition
EP0292314A2 *May 20, 1988Nov 23, 1988Unilever PlcProcess for encapsulating particles using polymer latex
EP0292314A3 *May 20, 1988Mar 22, 1989Unilever PlcProcess for encapsulating particles using polymer latex
EP0711847A1Nov 10, 1995May 15, 1996Arcomac Plasma Processing Lab. 1063371 Ontario Inc.Arc assisted CVD method and apparatus
EP1649937A1 *Apr 18, 2000Apr 26, 2006Boston Scientific LimitedCoating medical device using air suspension
EP1674078A2Jan 23, 2001Jun 28, 2006Warner-Lambert Company LLCFast dissolving orally consumable filsm containing an ion exchange resin as a taste masking agent
EP1698401A2Mar 7, 2002Sep 6, 2006Boston Scientific LimitedProtective cage for coating of medical devices
EP2266709A2Apr 18, 2000Dec 29, 2010Boston Scientific LimitedCoated medical devices
WO2000062830A2 *Apr 18, 2000Oct 26, 2000Boston Scientific LimitedCoating medical devices using air suspension
WO2000062830A3 *Apr 18, 2000Dec 28, 2000Scimed Life Systems IncCoating medical devices using air suspension
WO2003074196A2 *Feb 10, 2003Sep 12, 2003Boston Scientific LimitedMechanical and acoustical suspension coating of medical implants
WO2003074196A3 *Feb 10, 2003Feb 12, 2004Scimed Life Systems IncMechanical and acoustical suspension coating of medical implants
WO2010085780A1Jan 26, 2010Jul 29, 2010Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.Processes for coating a carrier with microparticles
WO2012136816A2Apr 5, 2012Oct 11, 2012BRKICIC, CvjetkoPharmaceutical composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/213, 118/303, 34/582, 118/62
International ClassificationB01J8/24
Cooperative ClassificationB01J8/245
European ClassificationB01J8/24B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 13, 1982B1Reexamination certificate first reexamination